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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I picked up my 14' MT09 with 14k on the clock. The previous owner was a mong, used the bike for burn-outs and silliness, was more into his drag racing cars and bodywork business. His wiring routine for example with the dwarf signals was appalling even by my standards of rather haphazard mechanical dexterity.

Have needed to spend nothing on the bike...now at 22k on the clock. And had noticed a sensation of vibrations changing in the peg and body near the chain, maybe also heard this, I like to believe I sensed this...as a combination of the sound and feel. So I spent some time a while back tightening the chain as it was still only 2-3 notches from the rear end of the markers. Immediately I felt this grinding, changing of vibrations worsen, so changed it back.

Made a stab at chain adjustment yesterday and spent 90 minutes adjusting then realising I need to do so to ensure the right slack is at the tightest point. Its okay, but still feel that sensation of the chain ups and downs. So watched Dave Moss video then did his checks for a mangled chain. At the lowest the slack is 25mm, the highest is 40mm. Its mainly 40mm. I can easily - in the majority of the chain - move the chain off the runner, also move it with my hand to barely a mm away from the rear tyre wall and to pull at the thing 90 degrees on the rear sprocket, its got easily a few mm of movement.

So...despite the notches, which to me suggest it could stretch a lot more, are these signs all definitely telling me, time to change?
 

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That's nacho cheese!
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If his was a life of burnouts and tom foolery, the chain will be stretched in places and will go tight...loose.....tight.......loose when you spin the wheel while the bike is on the rear stand.
I say put up a couple of photos of the chain and rear sprocket so we can get a look at the teeth as well. One other thing, grab hold of the counter shaft sprocket and see if their is any movement in the counter shaft itself when you try to move the sprocket around. Also check the rear hub bearings for play when you get a chance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If his was a life of burnouts and tom foolery, the chain will be stretched in places and will go tight...loose.....tight.......loose when you spin the wheel while the bike is on the rear stand.
I say put up a couple of photos of the chain and rear sprocket so we can get a look at the teeth as well. One other thing, grab hold of the counter shaft sprocket and see if their is any movement in the counter shaft itself when you try to move the sprocket around. Also check the rear hub bearings for play when you get a chance.
Likely no need to peek at the countersprocket.

The chain swings within 2-3mm of the tyre wall now.
Lifts very easily, more than an inch off the runner.
Likely can be pulled 3mm off the rear sprocket at 90 degree angle.

No major deal, I have been looking for a treat for the bike since I bought it, other than the ECU Flash I had done...new set of chain and sprockets seems a good use of half my tax rebate!
 

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McTavish
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Likely no need to peek at the countersprocket.

The chain swings within 2-3mm of the tyre wall now.
Lifts very easily, more than an inch off the runner.
Likely can be pulled 3mm off the rear sprocket at 90 degree angle.

No major deal, I have been looking for a treat for the bike since I bought it, other than the ECU Flash I had done...new set of chain and sprockets seems a good use of half my tax rebate!
If you are intending to say no need to check the countershaft shaft/sprocket fit because you've decided the chain is shot and will replace the chain and sprocketS, then fine and dandy.

Past that, I take it that you have multiple tight spots and sections of chain with different sectional lengths.
That on its own is automatic bin time.

As for D Moss, his presentation is flawed in one significant respect.
The checks should be done on a very clean chain that's warm, because that is when all the clearances are at their greatest.
True, tight spots can be visibly diminished, but the 3 o'clock tug will yield magnified results.
Personally, I rely heavily on 3 o'clock test results and the tight spots to get a feel for not just wear, but zone damage that is beyond wear.

By the way, it's nice to see you posting again!

Regards,

McTavish Mcromo
 
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