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Most of what I said in this thread is best practice type advice but like most things there are 40 different ways to get it done.... just, mine is the best, that's all. :D:D:D


And tiling is way easier than most peopel think. Just be patient.
 

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Just noticed the Bamboo thing - If anyones looking for Bamboo flooring, Ive got a buddy whos importing the stuff - Just tell him Ned sent you and youll get a better price !

http://stores.ebay.com/East-West-Floors

Depending on how our taxes work out, I may be replacing the crappy carpet in our living room / study with some of this stuff, glad to hear everyone likes it thus far.
 

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C'est la vie
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Ooo, I think I like that solid Bamboo stuff and it's stinkin' cheap. Does anybody know much that stuff will expand and contract though? The listing there just says try to keep the humidity constant. I'm starting to look into wood flooring for my house (ranch on a slab) but I've got some pretty crazy humidity swings. I almost can't get my humidity above 40% going through 2 gallons of water a day in my humidifier. And in the summer it'll see 80%+ easy on a rainy day.

Ok, Tile Flooring Threadjack over.
For now...


Edit: Actually, reading over it again I think that just won't be a viable option for me. Never mind. Please continue as you were.
 

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A friend of mine does sand-on-site wood floor installs. One smooth surface without any of that annoying micro-beveled edges. He did one of my neighbors main level in natural solid bamboo. After sanding it down smooth it looked like one big sheet of bamboo. Very awesome.
 

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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
wow that bamboo.... hmm.. gots some carpet to get rid of too and that's looking like a good option too!! Got some tile from don't scream at me to bad ragdoll "cheap at Lowes" it was on sale i'll post some pics of them before i bust them out of the box to see what you think but they were 78 cents per 12x12 tile and as long as i dont muck up the job too bad I think its got to be better than the vinyl thats there now!
 

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The Guy passing you...
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I installed roughly 700 sqft. of pre-finished Stilecraft bamboo in my new home. (3 months ago)

Its looks great, went down super easy, (nailed down on sub floor) and cleans up well.

Bad thing is it scratches really easy. We have a 70 lbs black lab that hates it and you can see his claw marks from trying to get traction on it and playing around. It wont be too bad once we get a lot of worn areas that give it a nice "used" looked.
 

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I installed roughly 700 sqft. of pre-finished Stilecraft bamboo in my new home. (3 months ago)

Its looks great, went down super easy, (nailed down on sub floor) and cleans up well.

Bad thing is it scratches really easy. We have a 70 lbs black lab that hates it and you can see his claw marks from trying to get traction on it and playing around. It wont be too bad once we get a lot of worn areas that give it a nice "used" looked.
Yep. Bamboo is a pretty soft floor product compared to a lot of hardwood floors. Especially a prefinished one.
 

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INFIDEL
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If you can score and snap your tiles then you are using crap tile.

Any tile worth laying will have such a hard glaze that it won't score/snap.

Also can't score/snap natural stone which is what I usually lay now.

I've done about 20-25 tile jobs now. I'd say that for a small project like yours you can get away with one of the cheap wet saws from Homie Depot for $90 or so. And then when you're done you can toss it on Craigs List for $70 and recoup.

Or get a 3.5hp 10" overhead wet saw like me and go to town. :)

For rounded cuts or quick tiny cuts get a cheaper angle grinder($30 at Lowes) and then pick up a cheap 4 1/2" diamond blade for it. I've used the same diamond blade for years now. It'll be a dry cut so the dust will be great, so you do those outside if you can. A great tool to have for cutting a hole out for the toilet drain. Remember the cut doesn't have to be super pretty since it'll be covered by the toilet.

Use spacers, they come in a bag of 100 or like 3 cents and are cheap insurance that it's done correctly. I still use them for some jobs.

Try to be anal about the water/thinset ratio. You can eye it up but to get optimum consistancy and workability you'll want to follow instructions.

Being a concrete floor you have to be sure there isn't a seal on of concrete that will inhibit the thinset from sticking. There is an acid wash that you're supposed to scrub on the floor before hand but I can't remember what the mixture is.

Tiling is simple if you double check everything before actually slapping them down. Even if you put them down and one or two are not straight or level, you have a day or so before they are really secured. So you can pull it up or break it out, scrap off the thinset on the ground, and do it again.

Always hide your cuts.

Give me $5

Seal the grout after it cures.

Lay the tiles sober-ish

Be patient too.

EDIT: The tool list above looks good. I would also add to that a Margin Trowel



They are useful for all kinds of stuff. Just buy it and use it you'll fine 100 uses for it. :)

Oh and if you're using 12x12 tiles and your floor is very level use a 3/8" x 3/8" square notch trowel for the whole job.

If you are only doing these two bathroom I would say buy very very cheap tools, they will work just fine for a few jobs.
Great info! The acid I think you are referring to is phosphoric acid. It's less dangerous than muriatic acid, but almost as effective at cleaning/etching the concrete.
 

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Il bambino e un cani
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Just about finished with these stairs, got the last of the flooring in today. Still have trim, paint, and the carpet runner to install. Oak treads, trim and flooring, painted popular risers. Built the oak and iron railings in my shop.
JohnnyB





 

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JohnnyB, I've wanted to replace my railings for the longest time with beautiful iron! I like what you did there ... very nice!

So, want to build some more? Just need to keep all potential openings less than 4" for code.
 

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Il bambino e un cani
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JohnnyB, I've wanted to replace my railings for the longest time with beautiful iron! I like what you did there ... very nice!

So, want to build some more? Just need to keep all potential openings less than 4" for code.

Yep, the width between the lower stiles is 5", although if I remember my code right the 4" rule only applies when the drop is greater than 32" or something like that....still this rail would not be code for new construction. The actual iron railing I built about 20 years ago. I just re-did everything in oak.

To be honest... I absolutely hate doing stair railings, I'll do straight railings till the cows come home....but just SO much room for error doing stairs. These days I avoid them unless I'm building the whole staircase too. You'll notice these were done on a steady run, instead of stiles of different lengths that go down and meet the stair treads.
I get stupid money for them too :)
JohnnyB
 

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There is good money in stair railings, carpenters that know how to do them are becoming few and far between, I love the guys I have seen popping up lately that call themselves carpenters yet they couldn`t begin to tell you how to lay out a rafter or stair stringers.
 

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Il bambino e un cani
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There is good money in stair railings, carpenters that know how to do them are becoming few and far between, I love the guys I have seen popping up lately that call themselves carpenters yet they couldn`t begin to tell you how to lay out a rafter or stair stringers.
Yep, I'd advise most people that want all wood stairs to buy a complete premade kit. The price to get stairs made by a real finish carpenter would be huge I imagine. I can build the stairs....but they end up about 90% right...that last 10% is very tough and takes years of experience.
JohnnyB
 

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What are you using for the floor? Natural stone or ceramic/porcelin? You will always always want a grout line. 1/16" is really as small as you can go. If you go that small you'll need to use unsanded grout or epoxy grout(all I ever use). The problem is, most tiles aren't perfect in their cuts. So one might be 1/16" bigger and the next 1/16" smaller. So if you have 1/16" or 1/8" grout lines you're going to end up with a pretty effed up looking floor trying to get everything to sit straight.

Ceramic: 3/8" grout lines are great for ceramic/porcelin. I think 1/4" is starting to look a little big. I did a floor at 1/4" and wasn't happy with it(the owner was though so whatever).

Natural cut stone: is more expensive usually and is more precise in it's cuts. So you can get away with 1/8" easy. I wouldn't do a 1/16" grout line at all until you are more experienced.

Also try to think of something to do different. Adding a little accent here or there is a nice touch.

Here's a pic of my 2nd floor bathroom.



The above picture is actually the first tile job I ever did. I figured I should practice on my house before messing up someone elses. :) I'm happy with the outcome for being my first time. I used one of those $88 Home Depot saws for the job.

---

The backsplash in my kitchen is Travertine. I took 18x18" tiles and cut them down to 6x3.75" tiles for a brick look. Used 1/16" grout lines. No problem there because I cut the tiles myself so I know they were all precise in their measurements. I used my newer high end tile saw to cut them too, I wouldn't recommend such a thing on one of the $88 HD specials. :)



Actually took this picture to show someone a loaf of bread I made from scratch but there's the out of focus wall. :) I wish the cutting board wasn't there or you could have see the granite countertop that I tiled.
not sure about the other tools, but definitely invest in knee pads... I thought i'd get by with folded up towels and I was WRONG! I'd talk with the guys at home depot, even if you aren't getting your materials from them... they usually have at least one guy with real experience in the department you're shopping in. GOOD LUCK!
 
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