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+1 on the tub saw . Youll waste less material - One lesson i learned, wear a mask while mixing groute, once you breath that stuff, youll be coughing it for weeks !
 

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Very impressive work ragdoll! It's hard to believe that your first floor turned out so perfect! Can you share any pics of your later exotic pro floors?

Here's a couple more stack questions for the pro.
)If the goal is easy to clean, how do you make the grout smooth and not recessed?

)On a wood subfloor, is it a must to add a bonderboard for strength?
 

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AJ, alot of great advice already. If you throw up some pics, we may be able to better direct you. Laying tile is quite easy. When I tile ... I first take into account the size and shape of the area. This will give you an idea of where to start to tile and where to hide or "even" out the cuts.

Even though you're on a slab, you need to take into account the transition to the next room or hall. I'll anal to having everything even and level. I can't stand transition steps or strips. I like to edge the tile at a transition point with a brass strip or even a marble/granite threshold. Very inexpensive and looks good.

Also, I'm not a big fan of 1/4 round, I would recommend removing the molding to get a "cleaner" look and finish.

Based on your small areas and the slab. I would recommend buy a tube of pre-mixed mastic. I have no issues with epoxy based mastic on the floor and none wet" verticals. But, I prefer to mix my own thinset for shower and tub surrounds.

When buying tile. Always refer to the "Class" rating. It goes from 1-5 with 5 being better. Be careful with Home Depot. They tend to carry lower class tile, where Lowe's carries a higher class.

Also, as already mentioned ... the only time you'd do a 1/16" grout line is with a granite or marble using the same color grout to get the "solid" piece look. Also, that would be unsanded grout and I would recommend an epoxy grout if you go that direction.

Depending on the level of tile you buy will help dictate your choice of tools. You have two relatively small areas ... I would definitely recommend that you rent a "wet saw" for a day at $40. It will make your life easier.

Remember the larger the tile the large the notch trowel.

Here's my recommend list:
- Tile :laugh:
- Definitely knee pads ... worth the $15. Trust me on this one. Don't be cheap.
- Notched trowel appropriate for tile size
- Float
- Thinset or per-mix mastic
- Grout
- A few "cheapo" pails that you can just toss after making the thinset and/or grout.
- Get several wooden mixing sticks from the paint department. With the small area you're doing ... just hand mix a few small batches at a time.
- 4-6 sponges ... makes the job go fast when using multiple sponges
- 4 larger pails (5 gal) for grout sponge rinse water

Again, throw up some pics, layout of room and dimensions with the tile you plan on using and there would be several people here to direct you on the layout and starting point.
 

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Ok......now I have a question, even though I've done plenty of tiling throughout the years I am in need of an answer to a dilema that I have. I tiled our downstairs hallways, bathroom and laundry room about 10 years ago over an exsisting concrete floor and I want to rip it out and lay bamboo flooring. What is the easiest way to remove all the residual mortar that will be there when I bust the crap out.

FYI, this job is going to suck...
 

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You've received some fantastic advice so far. The only thing you might want to consider is removing the kickboard or quarter round around in the room before hand. Because tiles vary slightly (as previously mentioned) you will be able to ensure that your first vieweable grout lines is straight and "hide" the inconsistencies edge under the trim. Be sure to have multiple buckets for clean water washes. It will save you time if you or a partner can quickly swap out with progressively cleaner water. Also, you might want to add a rubber mallet and 4 ft level to your tool list. And remember, when working with the mastic/ grout etc you have more time then you think you do. It’s a pretty forgivable process, so breathe.
 

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Ok......now I have a question, even though I've done plenty of tiling throughout the years I am in need of an answer to a dilema that I have. I tiled our downstairs hallways, bathroom and laundry room about 10 years ago over an exsisting concrete floor and I want to rip it out and lay bamboo flooring. What is the easiest way to remove all the residual mortar that will be there when I bust the crap out.

I like the Bamboo flooring looks really cool, I was thinking of installing it in my family room.. Good luck on the tile removal..
 

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Ok......now I have a question, even though I've done plenty of tiling throughout the years I am in need of an answer to a dilema that I have. I tiled our downstairs hallways, bathroom and laundry room about 10 years ago over an exsisting concrete floor and I want to rip it out and lay bamboo flooring. What is the easiest way to remove all the residual mortar that will be there when I bust the crap out.

FYI, this job is going to suck...
Are you going with natural bamboo or "Pergo" bamboo? In our basement I went with the actual Pergo bamboo laminate flooring with "quiet" backing for basement floors. I have zero moistures issues, so it was easier. And, I went with natural bamboo "burnt carmel" color in my oldests room. Absolutely beautiful. Picked it up fairly cheap at Costco. Back certain you go with a pneumatic nailer ... you will not be getting nails in this stuff with a "regular" nailer!

If you haven't done so ... verify moisture issues in the concrete floor.
 

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Ok......now I have a question, even though I've done plenty of tiling throughout the years I am in need of an answer to a dilema that I have. I tiled our downstairs hallways, bathroom and laundry room about 10 years ago over an exsisting concrete floor and I want to rip it out and lay bamboo flooring. What is the easiest way to remove all the residual mortar that will be there when I bust the crap out.

FYI, this job is going to suck...
Was it your first tile job? :laugh: Chipping that out requires pneumatic chisel.

You must not have splashing kids? Otherwise putting pergo next to a tub could be a warping disaster. Pergo is sure a lot easier to install than tile and as you point out if you get tired of it easy to replace and clean. hmmm.
 

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Are you going with natural bamboo or "Pergo" bamboo? In our basement I went with the actual Pergo bamboo laminate flooring with "quiet" backing for basement floors. I have zero moistures issues, so it was easier. And, I went with natural bamboo "burnt carmel" color in my oldests room. Absolutely beautiful. Picked it up fairly cheap at Costco. Back certain you go with a pneumatic nailer ... you will not be getting nails in this stuff with a "regular" nailer!

If you haven't done so ... verify moisture issues in the concrete floor.

I already have quite a bit of real carbonized bamboo flooring in my house whch I put in so no issues with the how-to there. I more than likely will stick with the real stuff in order to make the transistion seemless.
 

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Dynamite is the first thing that comes to mind. Just be sure to get the kiddies and Birdie Johnson out first. :innocent:

That's what I was afraid of.....:gaah:

Was it your first tile job? :laugh: Chipping that out requires pneumatic chisel.

You must not have splashing kids? Otherwise putting pergo next to a tub could be a warping disaster. Pergo is sure a lot easier to install than tile and as you point out if you get tired of it easy to replace and clean. hmmm.
Actually that was my second tile job ever. And I figured a pneumatic hammer might be in order....was just hoping for a different, less intrusive solution.

And why is everyone assuming that I am putting Pergo in a bathroom? That would be absolutely moronic. And no I don't have "splashing kids" I have room soaking drip water throughout the entire house kids!



Sorry for the highjack AJ, your question just got me to thinking.
 

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Fixed for ya.

Seriously, awesome tile work, Rags! Do you still do a lot of those jobs in Cha-town?
I still live in central Wisconsin. :) I WISH I was there already. I do a job here or there, yeah.

Rags,
I need to put flooring in my basement. It's cement now. How would you suggest I proceed to avoid water / moisture issues? I'm open to all forms of flooring. I guess I'm asking what your experience with basements is.
Thx.
Well... do you have moisture issues now? i.e. does your floor get wet randomly, after a rain storm, or on hot days(condensation)? If yes:

You probably won't want to put wood down(although there are ways around the issue if you really want it).

Carpet could be done but you'll want to have a threshhold between it and the concrete. A few different options for that.

Tile could be done but if the water issue isn't severe. You'd want to be sure to use a quality thin-set.



+1 on the tub saw . Youll waste less material - One lesson i learned, wear a mask while mixing groute, once you breath that stuff, youll be coughing it for weeks !
And dying of cancer for years. Careful with thinset powder and cement board particulates. Both will knock a year or 5 off your lifespan.

Very impressive work ragdoll! It's hard to believe that your first floor turned out so perfect! Can you share any pics of your later exotic pro floors?

Here's a couple more stack questions for the pro.
)If the goal is easy to clean, how do you make the grout smooth and not recessed?

)On a wood subfloor, is it a must to add a bonderboard for strength?
I don't really have many pictures online for differnet jobs.

Smooth grout lines? Hmmm.... Yeah you could just run the float over the top of the tile while the grout is still soft to make it even... but on a wider grout line, never did that before, never heard of that before either, ha. Using very narrow grout lines will address most of your concern. If you use a natural stone(granite/marble) you can go ahead with 1/16" grout lines(if you know what you're doing). I did my kitchen countertop with 12" granite tiles with 1/16" wide grout. I left it smooth so the whole surface is like one.

AJ,
Based on your small areas and the slab. I would recommend buy a tube of pre-mixed mastic.

Also, that would be unsanded grout and I would recommend an epoxy grout if you go that direction.
.
AJ, let me know if you use mastic mortar so I can come over to your house and beat you with a 2x4. That stuff is a joke. There are plenty of success stories with it but there are equal numbers of horror stories. It's strength is less than thin set, it's cure times are astronomical compared to thinset, and also ect ect ect. Ha. Go to a tile forum and ask about mastic. Bag-o-thinset is cheaper and better(pretty rare thing in this world) and very easy to use. Get a couple buckets and work with smaller amounts(READ the directions on the bag)

I only use epoxy grout. I did TWO jobs with standard portland-type grout because I couldn't convince the homeowners otherwise.

That said, your standard bag-o-grout is much easier to work with than the epoxy stuff. You REALLY need to be awake to use epoxy grout. The cleanup steps and timing is very critical to keep your floor from looking like arse. Also Epoxy grout is like 500x more expensive. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Sorry for the highjack AJ, your question just got me to thinking.
Ha! No problem it got me to thinking if i make a big mess of it all I'll get to use DynoMITE to get rid of the ugly floor.... :bliss:






JUST dont tell the insurance co. :)


and WOW didnt expect all the info... thanks!
 

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Very impressive work ragdoll! It's hard to believe that your first floor turned out so perfect! Can you share any pics of your later exotic pro floors?

Here's a couple more stack questions for the pro.
)If the goal is easy to clean, how do you make the grout smooth and not recessed?

)On a wood subfloor, is it a must to add a bonderboard for strength?
Missed a question before dood. On a wood subfloor you will need to add a 1/4" cement board down. And before you do that, you need to slap a thin layer of GRAY thinset down(gray thinset is unmodified and can dry quickly with out any exposure to air) and then the backer board. I don't know any pro tiler that doesn't use Hardi-Backer brand cement board. And as usual, the silica dust from Hardibacker can cause cancer. Mask yourself.

Oh, and thinset under a cement board is not there to bond, but to provide stability and eliminate deflection and movement caused by any variance in plane.

Ok......now I have a question, even though I've done plenty of tiling throughout the years I am in need of an answer to a dilema that I have. I tiled our downstairs hallways, bathroom and laundry room about 10 years ago over an exsisting concrete floor and I want to rip it out and lay bamboo flooring. What is the easiest way to remove all the residual mortar that will be there when I bust the crap out.

FYI, this job is going to suck...

Try breaking it up with a sledge hammer. An angle grinder with a diamond cup will knock the remainder down. You don't want any thinset sticking up beyond about 1/16".

That job is going to suck.
 
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