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Ride with grace.
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My turn signal switch is failing to fully engage when the temperature dips below freezing, and I have a feeling I just need to lube it somehow. I don't want to douse the contacts though - any ideas? Maybe something graphite? I'll take it apart if I need to, but if there's a quick fix, it would be appreciated. Aside from not riding in the cold...

Devin
 

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Careful with brake cleaner, though. It eats stuff!
Like paint. and some types of plastic.

brake cleaner is unfortunately a risky idea. it will also dissolve the grease that's supposed to be on the mechanism in there. if yours is sticky, it just needs lubing!

I used some chain wax as the spray can has the fitting to reach way into the mechanism much like the wd-40 can. only difference is the chain wax will stick better and should last longer. Did the trick nicely!
 

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Like paint. and some types of plastic.

brake cleaner is unfortunately a risky idea. it will also dissolve the grease that's supposed to be on the mechanism in there. if yours is sticky, it just needs lubing!

I used some chain wax as the spray can has the fitting to reach way into the mechanism much like the wd-40 can. only difference is the chain wax will stick better and should last longer. Did the trick nicely!
On another bike, I got some brake cleaner on the gauges and it ruined them. I could barely polish out the damage.
 

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Ride with grace.
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
WD40 worked, so far, but when I put the new bars on, I'll probably do some retro maintenance. Amazing what cold will do. I had a late model Ford Probe many years ago in Chicago (like 20) and when it was 18 below zero, the door hinges squeaked regardless of their age. I'll take 25 degrees and a little effort over flippin' cold any day.
 

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I'd use some sort of dielectric grease. It does not conduct electricity so you dont have to worry about it shorting anything out.

you just have to find one that lubes well in your temperature.
 

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Stick with WD40 because although its application is wet, once it still lubricates. The lubricant is dry. The wet portion helps with penetration and coating
 

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Glad I found this thread. Thanks for the help!
 

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2006 919, 2020 Zero SR/F
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Mine was super sticky when I bought it. Disassembled the switch, cleaned out the old grease which had basically turned into a waxy glue, and re-lubed with dielectric grease. Working perfectly now.

Only took 15-20 min, no reason to half-ass it.
 
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