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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
So I contacted my local Kawasaki dealer and I found out the oil filter can go in any way..
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
So when I drain the oil for 5 minuets, dose the bike have to be level or can it remain on the kick stand?
 

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I lean the bike side to side to get the last little bits hiding in pockets of the motor

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

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McTavish
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So when I drain the oil for 5 minuets, dose the bike have to be level or can it remain on the kick stand?
In whatever position places the drain port at the lowest elevation relative to the sump.
Just eyeball it.
If it's on a bottom flat, then bike upright is what you want.
If it's on a angled side, then leaned enough such that the bottom of the drain port is a low point.
 

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Old, Bold rider
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Hellos going to service the ninja 250r and was just wondering if I need to run the bike for abit to warm up the oil before I change it?
As a general rule the oil should be if not up to temperature, at least run for a couple of minutes to hold any contaminates long enough to keep them in suspension. The oil will drain much more quickly and completely, and it is much more effective in removing particulates. And yes, it should be drained on the side stand: most drain plugs are arranged for this.

Rob
 

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As a general rule the oil should be if not up to temperature, at least run for a couple of minutes to hold any contaminates long enough to keep them in suspension. The oil will drain much more quickly and completely, and it is much more effective in removing particulates. And yes, it should be drained on the side stand: most drain plugs are arranged for this.

Rob
Yeah, my take on this is that that's exactly what happened the last time the engine was run [assuming it was put away hot], and all the oil containing the contaminates is now sitting in the sump, waiting to drop into a container below. I wonder at the sense of running the engine, pumping the oil and contaminates all around it and then waiting, again, for the oil to drain back to the sump.

Of course, warm oil will drain more quickly, and will leave less of a coating inside the sump - agreed. But what volumes are we talking about - 20ml?

Anyway, that's just me. I used to do 'em hot, and now I do 'em cold, coz last time I ran it, I know the oil was hot AF.
 

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Old, Bold rider
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Yeah, my take on this is that that's exactly what happened the last time the engine was run [assuming it was put away hot], and all the oil containing the contaminates is now sitting in the sump, waiting to drop into a container below. I wonder at the sense of running the engine, pumping the oil and contaminates all around it and then waiting, again, for the oil to drain back to the sump.
Anyway, that's just me. I used to do 'em hot, and now I do 'em cold, coz last time I ran it, I know the oil was hot AF.
Around sixty years ago my father explained to me why the oil must be drained hot. If the engine has just been run to operating temperature any particulates are held in suspension rather than running down to the sump and collecting there. Draining hot oil immediately after shutting down carries solids with it, and any that has dropped to the bottom of the sump is scoured out by the turbulence of the hot oil as it drains. If drained cold the boundary layer of oil remains at the bottom of the sump and the passage of the rest of the oil out of the sump will leave a large percentage of solids collected there. There is a very good reason why all car manufacturers strongly recommend draining oil when hot.

As to the hot AF oil getting on your hands ... early on in over thirty years as a car line tech at the dealership level I found a way to keep it from happening: when removing the drain plug rotate it until you feel the last thread clear the sump, then slowly tilt it toward whatever you don't want the oil to get on (that's YOU) while keeping it touching the drain hole at the top. The oil will drain straight down initially and your hand is not in the path. Continue to tilt the plug until it is clear of the draining oil. It works quite well, and after more than 40,000 oil changes (conservative estimate) I don't have to think about doing it.

Rob
 
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