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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After receiving a quote of $330 from a local shop for a mounted, balanced, Michelin Road 5, I looked into what it would take to do it at home. I also had the front tire showing wear bars so it was needed too.

Amazon (Mass Depot) had a deal of $314 for both front and rear Power 5s. Ordered the set, arrived early, with date codes of 4720 (47th week, 2020) for the rear and 1721 (17th week, 2021) for the front.

Also from Amazon, I purchased:
Balancer $40 (Gazechimp Portable Pocket Wheel Balancing Tire Kit, Heavy Duty
Motorcycle/Bike/MX Wheel Balancer)

158512

Spoon Kit $24 (NEIKO 20601A 14.5 inch Steel Tire Spoon Lever Iron Tool Kit | Professional Tire Changing Tool for Motorcycle, Dirt Bike, Lawn Mower | 3 pcs Tire Spoons | 3 Rim Protector | Valve Tool | 6 Valve Cores)
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Stems $9 (BLACKHORSE-RACING 25 Pack TR412 Rubber Tire Snap-in Short Valve Stem ATV Lawn Mower Garden Tractor Plug Stem for Tubeless 0.453” 11.5mm Rim Holes on Standard Vehicle Tires)


Weights $8 (CKAuto 1/4oz, 0.25oz, Black, Lead Free, Adhesive Stick on Wheel Weights, EasyPeel Type. Cars, Trucks, SUVs, Motorcycles, RC Cars. Low Profile, 12oz/Box, U.S. OEM Quality, (48pcs))

Big Ass C-Clamp $19 (Tractor Supply)

I was most concerned about damaging or scratching the wheels so I proceeded very carefully.

Started at the rear and first played with the old tire/wheel on the balancer. I convinced myself the balancer was accurate to much less than 1/4 oz. by adding and removing weights.

I need to come up with a better way to break the bead. While the big ass C-clamp, and blocks of wood, eventually got the job done with zero damage to anything, I need to find (or make) something that requires less profanity to operate effectively.


Taking my time and working at a leisurely pace, I got them both done in a little over 4 hours.

Total cost tires $ 314
Total cost equipment $ 100 (all reusable)
Total $414

So, for $414, I have new front and rear tires, and the equipment to do more, versus paying the dealer $330 for a single rear.

Took it out for a run today and was pleased to find there were no vibrations. Will take a while to get used to new tires as the older ones (Michelin 3 on the front, 4 on the back) were flat-spotted a bit in the middle. This is the first time since the bike was new I had new front and rear tires at the same time, lol...

Have to say I'm rather pleased with myself....

Rob
2002 919
50k + miles and counting
 

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Motion pro bead breaker is the answer. I use the small aluminum ones with a little lube. Easy once you get the technique down. Portable as well.

Sent from my moto g power using Tapatalk
 

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Back when I was young with y'alls energy, I'd put the base of a bumper jack on the tire and jack the truck up on it to break the bead.
whew... Broke a sweat just remembering the effort
My buddy uses his side stand to break the bead- get the tire under it and rock the bike over on it. Some of that old side-of-the-road shit
 

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Tryna seat the bead with a hand pump or low-volume air source?
 

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I've grown smarter in my old age. Instead of trying to break beads at home (the really hard part of tire changing) I pull the wheels and take them to the motorcycle shop closest to my house and ask them to dismount the tires. They seem very happy to do that for a modest fee. Then back at home, I can mount the new tires which, if you use a tire mounting lube, you can almost do with your bare hands. I can balance them if necessary but I find that with Michelin brand tires I very seldom have to add any balance weights so I don't even bother to check.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
That's brilliant! I can work up something like that. Thanks!

(It reminds me of a video I saw of a guy that had built a strut spring compressor. Similar mechanism as above but he mounted it to the wall and had a little seat so he sat on the handle, using his body weight to compress the spring, and leaving both hands free to work on the strut collar. Brilliant!)
 

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Well done! I just changed by 10th set of tires on my 919. Always satisfying. I use a bead breaker very similar to rufftup. Works great.
 

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I've grown smarter in my old age. Instead of trying to break beads at home (the really hard part of tire changing) I pull the wheels and take them to the motorcycle shop closest to my house and ask them to dismount the tires. They seem very happy to do that for a modest fee. Then back at home, I can mount the new tires which, if you use a tire mounting lube, you can almost do with your bare hands. I can balance them if necessary but I find that with Michelin brand tires I very seldom have to add any balance weights so I don't even bother to check.
That's smarter? :unsure:

The easy part is getting them off of the rim. Then take the rim and tire in to get mounted. Tires Plus would charge me $10. You guys are something with your big tire irons, hammers, scratched rims, and bloody knuckles.
 

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That's smarter? :unsure:

The easy part is getting them off of the rim. Then take the rim and tire in to get mounted. Tires Plus would charge me $10. You guys are something with your big tire irons, hammers, scratched rims, and bloody knuckles.
Yeah, who wants to risk getting their manicure all mussed up, am I right? :eek:
 
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