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Out for a ride.
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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,

It has been several years since I sold my 919, and I'm coming around to wanting another naked. That said, there's not too much that really excites me these days as I'm looking for a fun bike to enjoy for a few hours on some back roads for a time.

The closest thing to a purchase is probably the R Nine T Pure - it has a nice visceral feel and classic looks (I like round head lamps). That said, it costs more, has many more electronics and systems to consider, and I'm not sure if for the price I'd love the ride as much as my old '02 919. As I recall, my Honda was dead simple, dead reliable, and a lot of fun.

One thing I love about both th 919 and the R Nine T are the looks - kind of throw back with those big round headlamps. I'm not into the origami designs.

I'm wondering if anyone else has seat time between the two - any thoughts or suggestions?
 

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Another one you may consider that seems to possibly fit your parameters is the Honda CB1100.

Honda reliability, simplistic design/technology but newer than the 919.
And can probably pick up a nice example in the $5k range.

https://www.collegebikeshop.com/--xInventoryDetail?id=7784902

It is air cooled, but power specs are close. Looks like HP may be a bit down to the 919, but a bit more or similar torque.
Looks like it does an adequate job in the handling department for semi-spirited riding, but probably not quite as sporty as the 919.

https://youtu.be/zPPUKp_CsFI
 

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And there’s always the Z900RS for the throwback look.

But it is probably going to be similar to the BMW in terms of price and technology.
Would just be a matter of preference.
 

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Out for a ride.
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Discussion Starter #4
Yeah, I owe it to myself to try a CB11100. It reads like a great bike and I've seen the 1:1s with the R9T, but it is more retro looking than I'm after. People seem to take them the cafe racer route.
 

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McTavish
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Yeah, I owe it to myself to try a CB11100. It reads like a great bike and I've seen the 1:1s with the R9T, but it is more retro looking than I'm after. People seem to take them the cafe racer route.
How do you feel about the Z900RS?
 

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I like my 919 but if I had replace it it woudl be something different--plenty of great bikes out there, so no need to repeat.

The CB1100 is absolutely electric, but heavy & I think a clunky shifter. Lopes down the road even with the 5 speed (after the first year they gave it a 6 speed anyway). The tank looks square from the riders perspective (13-14s) & for some reason that freaks me out. Park the 919 & CB1100 side by side & people will flat out push over the 919 & stand atop it to gaze at the CB1100 & ask you all sorts of questions or tell you stories about a bike they used to have like that. The air cooling is so odd in modern day you want to have it, plus no coolant to change.

The Z900RS is similar to the 919 in power but a little more snappy at the throttle in low revs (keep in mind I have a 17t on my 919 though). The sound is the best stock exhaust I have ever heard, & by modern standards LOUD. I woudl not dream of replacing the stock exhaust. Unfortunately for me the bike is TALLLLL. The tank looks bulbous from the riders view (919 looks best from riders view).

Never ridden a beemer but that is the way I would go. Why? See my first sentence--never tried one. Really like the entire R series & the 9T line. Shaft drive is my #1 checkpoint as I tire of chain maintenance.
 

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Out for a ride.
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Discussion Starter #8
I like my 919 but if I had replace it it woudl be something different--plenty of great bikes out there, so no need to repeat.

The CB1100 is absolutely electric, but heavy & I think a clunky shifter. Lopes down the road even with the 5 speed (after the first year they gave it a 6 speed anyway). The tank looks square from the riders perspective (13-14s) & for some reason that freaks me out. Park the 919 & CB1100 side by side & people will flat out push over the 919 & stand atop it to gaze at the CB1100 & ask you all sorts of questions or tell you stories about a bike they used to have like that. The air cooling is so odd in modern day you want to have it, plus no coolant to change.

The Z900RS is similar to the 919 in power but a little more snappy at the throttle in low revs (keep in mind I have a 17t on my 919 though). The sound is the best stock exhaust I have ever heard, & by modern standards LOUD. I woudl not dream of replacing the stock exhaust. Unfortunately for me the bike is TALLLLL. The tank looks bulbous from the riders view (919 looks best from riders view).

Never ridden a beemer but that is the way I would go. Why? See my first sentence--never tried one. Really like the entire R series & the 9T line. Shaft drive is my #1 checkpoint as I tire of chain maintenance.
Since the 919 I've been on a couple Triumphs, and most recently an America (cruiser), so I want to move back to a neutral position, or be over the pegs. The R Nine T seems very much like the 919 from memory - good torquey grunt, and the dry clutch has a bit of a gritty feel which is nice. Only down side is price, but you also get ABS, and can get OEM heated grips.
 

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McTavish
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Not a huge fan of the fairing honestly. I really like the exposed naked look.
Same for me, but it's only the Cafe version that has the fairing.
If I had the coin and the space, I'd be buying one, in the original brown/orange colour scheme.
 

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Yeah, I owe it to myself to try a CB11100. It reads like a great bike and I've seen the 1:1s with the R9T, but it is more retro looking than I'm after. People seem to take them the cafe racer route.
It’s a bike I would like to have as a second bike.
But I’m not really in a position for that.
I could work it out, but 4 kids in the house.
Maybe when they all grow up I’ll get multiple bikes.
Still have too much of a thirst for speed and really good twisty road handling.

My first bike was a 1979 Suzuki GS1000E and I really wish I still had it.
It reminds me a lot of it and I bet it has many of the same characteristics just modernized.
But I moved across the country when I got married and so I gave it to my dad. Only paid $300 for it and he helped me getting it running really well.
 

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In 2015 i tested a BMW R1200R and it was an updated 919. The good things were that it had ABS and all the electronics because it's 10+ years newer, and the seat and the handlebar, really, they were much more comfortable. The "bad" things were the vibrations from the boxer and the price.


"i don't ride that way, just posing"



I also tested a XSR900 and it was very similar in power, more agile, better brakes, but way more uncomfortable. Not a better bike for me (pillion is a must).


 

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Wanna free cat?
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I have an 03 919 that I'll make you a great deal on. Has a few dings, but it's a solid bike...Texas 75711
 

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IMO, you should price out a bike like the Z09 or whatever else meets all the specs, then compare that price to the 919.

So if you find that the bike you spec out is $6K, then you find a 919 for $3K, that'll give you $3K budget to bring it to the specs you want.

So if it's a suspension, valve adjustment, brakes, etc... can you get all that done on the 919?

I've see some very clean 919 that have several choice upgrades in the $3~4K range. If you add in maybe $1K worth of upgrades, then you'd have something very comparable to the Z09 or BWM, Monster or whatever.

Personally, I've seen 919 with the rear shock and other upgrades in the $3K range, so they're out there.

I think the agreed downsides of the 919 are the suspension, lights and fuel control. Get one with the rear shock already done and a PCIII, then upgrade the forks for the F4i, add a $100 headlight and you're in.
 

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If you have to spend $3000 on a motorcycle to "bring it up to spec", you've bought the wrong motorcycle; unless you just enjoy wasting money that you'll never get back, and wrenching on 13+ year old clunkers.

After I bought my first KTM, I saw the light about buying cheap Jap fixer-uppers.
 

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I'm not sure calling the 919 a cheap jap bike is right, but I would agree that spending 3k on a 3k doesn't sound smart. However, I'd argue a 3k 919 with 3k in mods is a better bike than anything you'll get for 6k unmodded.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

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I personally, at this point, would want any future bikes to be ready to ride, especially for an only/primary bike.
Unless it was a project for something for me to work on.

That being said when I bought my 919, it was my first bike in about 20 years (and second bike overall).
Like many motorcycle owners, I am not a mechanic (home or real/paid) but decently mechanically inclined, and can figure out some things if there are good instructions available.

In that respect the 919 I got was perfect for me at the time and for getting back into riding and learning some fundamentals of motorcycle maintenance.
I think I paid $2,500 for it and probably put another couple thousand into it.
Didn’t recoup it all, but was a worthwhile experience for me at the time.

Things I did within the first couple thousand miles:
Oil change, Spark plugs, K&N air filter, Chain and sprockets (15/43), Wheel bearings, Power Commander III and Custom map/accelerator pump settings, New tires, Tech Spec tank pads, GIVI brackets and top case.

Had I kept it longer, as I developed more riding skill/experience (and learned more about the importance of suspensions) probably would have eventually wanted to have some suspension work/upgrades done.
Which probably would have been another thousand or so, depending on what was done.

I know eventually, given enough time and miles, all bikes need maintenance (and usually find some upgrades/options/accessories that you end up wanting).
Just don’t think going forward I want to buy an older model that needs a bunch right from the get go.

My current bike had 3500 miles when I bought it and probably at least $3000 of highly desirable mods, done by an experienced owner who knew what they were doing.
Best way to buy a used bike IMO, if they are mods you would plan on doing or would want to do.
They put the money into it and you pay a fraction (if any) of the cost.
I got it for $500 less than the next closest priced one I could find at the time (expansive search), and it was bone stock.
Motivated seller who needed to sell it for big life changes (going into business for himself).

The used (but newer) bikes where the owner realizes it is too much bike or they don’t enjoy riding; after they mod it up nicely, put less than 1000 miles on it and have the first service done, can be great bargains if you have time to wait for the right deal and the cash ready to buy it.
 

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919 Rider
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I paided $3000 for my 919 and spent at least $3000 on upgrades and mods.
The bike is perfect for me now and I'd do it all over again.
I like the 919. It does everything I need it to do. Extremely reliable and simple.
At the moment if I had to replace my 919 it would probably be with another 919. I got $3000 worth of mods I can put on it! And a shed full of spare parts.
Next choice would be a Z900rs. In black of course.
 

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If you have to spend $3000 on a motorcycle to "bring it up to spec", you've bought the wrong motorcycle; unless you just enjoy wasting money that you'll never get back, and wrenching on 13+ year old clunkers.

After I bought my first KTM, I saw the light about buying cheap Jap fixer-uppers.
I take a very different view on this. Pretty much every car/truck/bike that I own, I bought as cheap as I could and it's turned out great.

Example: one of my trucks was very rusty and had engine problems. I did a full frame off resto and now have exactly the engine, trans, paint, etc that I want. I know the engine is new, I know the cam, carb, heads, crank, everything because I built it exactly the way I wanted it.

The same with my other truck and most of my cars. I say most of the cars because one is a project and a good example.

The project car is a 1966 Mustang with no engine, trans, etc... The engine being prepped is a 5.0 HO roller with an AOD trans. This is the engine I wanted, and it's the engine that I have. When finished, it'll be a candy apple red, 66 mustang with a 5.0 HO, AOD with suspension upgrades and stock look on the outside. This is what I want (except it's not a convertible).

Buying a car/bike/truck dirt cheap, leaves you with the money to build the engine, suspension, etc that YOU want.

With the 919, you spend from a few hundred to a few grand and you get the bike you want.

In the end, the 919 is just a machine, it's a pump inside of a frame with wheels. You can buy a 'perfect' bike for $10K or you can spend $4~6K on a 919 and have a bike that will compare well to the 'perfect' bike. You'll probably save on insurance, DMV and you can fine tune the bike the way you want.

For the price of a great bike ~$8K... you can have an awesome, ultra dependable 919 with full suspension upgrade (front and rear), lighting, fuel control, etc... and be a head of the game by a few grand.

I've been doing this to cars, bikes, trucks for decades and it's very rewarding.

The thread finishing up right now is a 919 being fully reworked and it looks like it's going to be an amazing bike.
https://www.wristtwisters.com/forums/f2/919-revival-80743.html

He's not the only one to have done this, but look at the work being done... look at the parts he's got. Pretty soon, he's going to have this finished and I'm sure it'll be amazing.

The only thing that can make his bike better is to park it in my driveway :D. (somehow I doubt he'll store it in my driveway).
 

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Tell me how much money you'll get back out of your awesome, $8000 919, when you sell it.

And if you like fiddle-farting around with old junk, that's cool. A 919 is a fine motorcycle, until you ride something better. I'd rather ride than wrench.

I paid $7500 for an 848 Streetfighter. I replaced $120 worth of timing belts (that it probably did NOT need), other than that, nothing beyond what any Jap bike would need. It didn't need any upgrades, nor mods. Higher end bikes come completed. I've only had it for a couple of years, which is no indicator of longevity, but the newer Ducs have a decent rep. A couple of months ago, I could have probably gotten almost all my money back out of it. But since the dems have successfully destroyed the economy, who knows.
 

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I don’t disagree with what you’re saying, but ultimately the decision is probably relative, based on a few factors.

If you have the time, tools, know how, and are approaching it as a labor of love then this is definitely a very fulfilling path.
Although generally, from an economic perspective usually can’t recoup all of the associated cost (and especially if you consider time value), and the total cost usually doesn’t align with market value (unless it is a highly desired vehicle).
But that usually isn’t the point in these projects as most of the time they are long term keepers.

Although newer vehicles likely have steeper depreciation costs over time also.

But if you want a vehicle that can be used from day one with no or minor initial maintenance needed, and the price/associated costs aligns more closely with market value, then something newer probably fits the bill a bit better.

Many people (probably most, myself included) approach vehicle ownership as a utilitarian device or fun toy, or combination of both.
And understand there are costs involved with ownership but try to minimize those costs as best they can within the parameters of how they want the vehicle to perform and what they desire to accomplish with it.
Toys obviously getting more discretionary funds thrown their way for “unnecessary” items.

I see the value in owning older vehicles. But don’t have the skills to rebuild one.
I daily drive an 03 4Runner with 180k miles, and will keep it until it stops running and can’t be repaired within reason.
Overall it is much cheaper than making continual car payments on new cars.
But it serves a utilitarian purpose.
That’s why it’s a Toyota.😉

I take a very different view on this. Pretty much every car/truck/bike that I own, I bought as cheap as I could and it's turned out great.

Example: one of my trucks was very rusty and had engine problems. I did a full frame off resto and now have exactly the engine, trans, paint, etc that I want. I know the engine is new, I know the cam, carb, heads, crank, everything because I built it exactly the way I wanted it.

The same with my other truck and most of my cars. I say most of the cars because one is a project and a good example.

The project car is a 1966 Mustang with no engine, trans, etc... The engine being prepped is a 5.0 HO roller with an AOD trans. This is the engine I wanted, and it's the engine that I have. When finished, it'll be a candy apple red, 66 mustang with a 5.0 HO, AOD with suspension upgrades and stock look on the outside. This is what I want (except it's not a convertible).

Buying a car/bike/truck dirt cheap, leaves you with the money to build the engine, suspension, etc that YOU want.

With the 919, you spend from a few hundred to a few grand and you get the bike you want.

In the end, the 919 is just a machine, it's a pump inside of a frame with wheels. You can buy a 'perfect' bike for $10K or you can spend $4~6K on a 919 and have a bike that will compare well to the 'perfect' bike. You'll probably save on insurance, DMV and you can fine tune the bike the way you want.

For the price of a great bike ~$8K... you can have an awesome, ultra dependable 919 with full suspension upgrade (front and rear), lighting, fuel control, etc... and be a head of the game by a few grand.

I've been doing this to cars, bikes, trucks for decades and it's very rewarding.

The thread finishing up right now is a 919 being fully reworked and it looks like it's going to be an amazing bike.
https://www.wristtwisters.com/forums/f2/919-revival-80743.html

He's not the only one to have done this, but look at the work being done... look at the parts he's got. Pretty soon, he's going to have this finished and I'm sure it'll be amazing.

The only thing that can make his bike better is to park it in my driveway
. (somehow I doubt he'll store it in my driveway).
 
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