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Honda Addict
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Even though not everyone here rides the same bike I'm sure that most of you have plenty of experience with chain maintenance. I tackled the nasty task of cleaning the goop and grit off my 919 chain this weekend and adjusted the slack. 2 different things I need suggestions on:

1. I'm still using the old method of sacrificing a worn out t-shirt, cutting it into a bunch of little rags and drenching them in kerosene then getting every nook, cranny, link, and tooth I can then going over everything with a dry rag. Also use an old toothbrush for in between the links. I think this is probably the least effecient and messiest way to do it but it works. Open to your suggestions on how to make this task easier and maybe more thorough.

2. Regarding the adjustment, getting the desired amount of slack isn't the problem. The aligment is the problem. I have noticed that going by the notches on the adjusters doesn't necessarily put the rear sprocket in alignment with the front. Since the adjusters Honda used on the 919 are kinda lame, this isn't surprising. I tried "eyeballing" the alignment front rear to front with the chaingaurd off and I think I have it close but the rear brake rotor rubs about 3/4 of a turn and then gets easier. Wondering if I have a slightly warped rotor. Also, I noticed that looking at the way the chain runs across the teeth on the rear sprocket. It doesn't look consistent in one full revolution - i.e. the teeth look like they run in the center of the chain for most of the way around then shift towards one side, again about 3/4 of the way around. Judging from the wear pattern on the rear sprocket, it was running a little to the hub side since the paint is polished off where the chain rides but not eating into the sprocket face. The front sprocket looks fine after cleaning and inspecting it. The front is newer than the back since I have been running a 17t for about 1000 miles now.

Any pointers you all can recommend on making sure everything is lined up correctly would sure be appreciated.

Oh, and I was also wondering what type of chain lube you prefer and how often you apply it. I use the Honda HP red-can-teflon-stuff which doesn't seem to fling off and make a big mess on the swingarm. Had a lot of goop on the chain tho so maybe I'm using it too often.
 

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1. I use one of those brushes that you'd find in the dish soap section at your grocery store... with a handle on top... they're about 2.5 inches by 5 inches. I run that across the chain and it makes it all gold and shiney.

2. Someone here will explain the whole tie-a-string-to-this-and-that technique. I'm too lazy explain it and would probably forget part of it.


I use the Honda red can chain spray too.
 

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That's nacho cheese!
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About every third lube, I pull the rear tire off and drag the chain through a bath of kerosene and use a cheap little paint brush to scrub everything. Then use compressed air to blow the excess into a rag. Let her air dry while I clean everything else up with kerosene then Honda spray cleaner. Shoot the links with lube while they are sitting on a news paper. Let it soak. Then wipe off excess.

For the periodic lube, I do as you do, razor.

Allignment?????? I'm kinda lazy. I use the swingarm marks, then look along the chain from back to front to see it is straignt.
 

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Quitting is for Quitters!
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I use Simple Green Solution on my chain. I don't dilute it just spray it right on. Let it sit for about 5-10 minutes use a brush and clean all around. Take your water hose and just hose it off. Leaves the chain good as new. Then apply your chain wax of course. Good thing about simple green is it won't harm the plastics if you do get a little on them. Hope this helps.
 

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The only suggestion I have regarding cleaning is be careful with those brushes, air guns, or whatever. It does not take much to dislodge the grease inside the "o"rings and then it's premature failure time.

As far as the string method goes good luck! I must be retarded because I have been trying that procedure from time to time for the past 30 years without much luck. A quick way to check the alignment between the rear wheel and the countershaft sprocket is to spin the rear wheel. After it stops push on the outer side of the chain against the sprocket. It should have a slight amount of give. Repeat this procedure for the inner side of the chain.
You are looking for the chain to be more or less centered on the rear sprocket.
Another technique is to use a 6" caliper good to 0.001"and set both adjusters to the same value with respect to the end of the swing arm.

If money is no object and you want the real "hot set-up" I suggest laser-lines.

Chain lube of my choice is Maxima Chain Wax applied every 300 miles right after a ride when the chain is still warm.
 

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That's nacho cheese!
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Umm, yes, carefull with the blow. The idea of a warm chain lube application is brilliant, but it does not mean we will be taking long hot showers together, Mike.
 

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Bigdaa said:
Umm, yes, carefull with the blow. The idea of a warm chain lube application is brilliant, but it does not mean we will be taking long hot showers together, Mike.
Sheesh... first Brokeback Mtn. looses the best picture oscar and now it's no hot showers!:lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the ideas homies.

Does anyone use or remember that chain scrubbin' box device that popped up on Motorush a while back.. Does it work or was it a disappointing gimmick?

I agree with Bigdaa's suggestion about taking the wheel off and using a nylon brush with kerosene. I did that when I mounted new tires and the chain came out super clean. Put a wire basket upside down in a drain pan so that the chain was never actually submerged in the kerosene.

Chains sure are a pain in the arse but can't beat em for performance!!
 

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What's up tvetree, looks like we're neighbors and have the same ride.
As far as the string alingment thing, I never could get it either. I'm too ANAL to like the caliper measurement method. I guess I can't convince myself the ends of the swingarm are exact.
A buddy of mine has one of the Muzzy wheel alignment tools. A bar with "anchors points" that slide along the bar and also move in and out. Measure on one side of the bike, put it on the other side and set up to match, your good to go. Best motorcycle tool I've seen, IMO.
 

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I used to be a fan of putting the bike up on a stand... and drenching the chain in WD40 while spinning it around a few times...

Let that soak in and loosen up the grit, then wipe off everything I could. Let it sit for a bit and then give it good wipedown before applying some stuff in a gold and black can... Maxima sounds close.

Of course doing just after a long ride is always nice while chain is warm... the crud seemed to just drip right off.
 

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I just had a good idea for squids and others of this type. Put little LED's inside the rivets of each link that light up when the bike is driving! Everyone with a strobe kit on their bike will buy it! I'm a millionaire.
 

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1) If you use Lucas 90W gear oil you won't get near the build-up of chain wax/dirt and it's much easier to clean off. We all know how fun chain wax is to clean, right?! Whatever you put on the chain is going to sling off to some degree, unless you're not using enough. I designated about 6 rags for cleaning/oiling the chain. Fold a rag and run the oil across the rag 3-4 times. Then put the rag under the chain, on the bottom, and spin the rear tire with your right hand. Easy as hell. I can clean and oil the chain in less than a minute.

Rule of thumb: If you're dripping oil on the ground you're using too much oil. If your chain is still noisy then you don't have enough oil. When the chain gets quiet you have enough. Every 500 miles.

2) Be careful with your choice of brushes. Make sure you get a soft bristle brush so you don't damage the O-rings. I use an old toothbrush and Honda's brand of Brake/Contact Cleaner to clean the chain. The secret in using the gear oil is you're actually cleaning the chain each time you oil it. It looks nice and shiny instead of dull and dirty.

3) I always double check the swingarm notches when I first get a bike by measuring from the swingarm pivot bolt to the axle on each side, center to center. Once I know they are correct, I just use the notches to set the alignment. Everyone has a tape measure!

After 21K+ miles on the same chain and sprocket set, I think this is a very good method. The chain hasn't stretched since it went through the initial break-in period and still shows "New" on the swingarm indicator.
 
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I always double check the swingarm notches when I first get a bike by measuring from the swingarm pivot bolt to the axle on each side, center to center. Once I know they are correct, I just use the notches to set the alignment. Everyone has a tape measure!

What he said!
You should never go by just the notches.
I'm confused about the "I just use the notches to set the alignment" Part. It's rare that the notches are dead on. If ya use the notches to set the alignment after you used a tape measure you're putting it back out of alignment. :nono:
 
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