Well it finally happened...I crashed. - Wrist Twisters
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post #1 of 55 Old 06-12-2008, 06:53 PM Thread Starter
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Well it finally happened...I crashed.

Well it finally happened….I had an accident. Not entirely serious, and not a minor tip over in the park. I was able to walk away so that probably leans towards the not so bad spectrum. I’m not sure if it was a high side or low, I still can’t tell the difference between the two. I was taking a back roads home from work. It is a beautiful day, no humidity, and sunny. I stopped at a restaurant I discovered the last time I went through this area. Upon leaving the restaurant 5 minutes later I was coming up to a left turn. I couldn’t see all the way around so I consciously went wide right to increase visibility and delay my apex as I’ve read in Proficient Motorcycling. Then it happened……. When it came time to turn/lean I was over too much and was skirting the sand/gravel on the edge. I’m not sure if it was a combination of too fast(probably), wrong place, or not enough experience, but I do know that I did have time to think,” straighten up” and “here we go!” before I was thrown and the bike went flying. You all know the saying,” everyone falls once, and in a way I’m glad it’s over and not too serious. For those of you who have not experienced this let me tell you it happens very fast, and you instantly become aware of the powerful the bike you are controlling is when you lose control over that monster.
I’m sure inexperience played a part but I don’t years of experience could have avoided the ditch and I remember saying, “Here we go” which may have allowed me to relax somewhat, because I distinctly remember seeing my hands hit the dirt. I had the wind knocked out of me, which is scary unto itself, my visor had been ripped off, my tank bag was under me and I and the bike were in a gully. If you think a crash is scary the second part is even more frightening. Realizing you are alone, on a road that is rarely used in the middle of nowhere, and getting dark. This part was the worst, I wasn’t sure if I was really ok, if my bike was working, and had no idea if I would be able to right it anyway. I thought about calling 911, but I wouldn’t have been able to tell them where I was. With the help of adrenaline and shock I was able to get the bike back up, pick out all the grass and dirt and survey the damage. Ouch! The following took the brunt of the hit, tank chrome gauge box, headlight, rear fairing, turn signals cracked, broken or bent, my new pazo clutch lever, mirrors, and engine (even with guards). With hesitation I gathered up my yard sale, and started up. Thank God the bike was running and I was able to limp home.
Before everyone gets all over me, let me say I WAS WEARING full body gear, I always do. I’m still a newbie and before I even started to ride I purchased a full face helmet, Bohn Air-mesh body armor pants, Coretech jacket with spine, elbow, shoulder pads, boots, and gloves with carbon knuckles. When I finally got home I was able to really survey how my body took the impact, and am “pleased” to say my gear protected and showed wear in all the key essential protection zones. So for all those out there who might be reading this WEAR YOUR GEAR!
So now the question is what do with the bike? Fear not fellow 919’ers I’m keeping it. I love it too much. I’m talking about 1.) Assessing the damage, and 2.) repairs. I am hoping anyone who has dealt with the same situation can lend me some assistance. For example, repairing the scratches and getting the bike painted. Would it be easier to buy used un scratched on eBay or buy OEM ? How to tell if there are hidden mechanical problems?

Well that’s about the end of my drama. Thanks for letting me vent out the fear, and adrenaline of the accident. You guys really are the only “community” I felt I could share this with. It’s not like I could tell my mother her son was lying in a ditch on some back road or she’d freak. Gotta go take some Advil, back is starting to spasm and get sore.

There's your plan and then there's God's plan.........
Your's doesn't matter.
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post #2 of 55 Old 06-12-2008, 07:05 PM
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Glad to hear you're ok, the first crash absolutly sucks but at least you lived to tell about it (crashing doesn't get any easier) and you now know you don't want to do it again.
If your helmet took a good hit replace it, they're designed to absorb impact only one good time.
FYI a low side is when the bike lays down and tries to slide away from you, a highside is when it tries to throw you as far as it can then it leaps into the air and tries to crush the living daylights out of you.
If you love your motorcycle set it free, if it comes back to you you've highsided and your troubles have just begun.
P.S. you're gonna hurt tomorrow.

Dan

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post #3 of 55 Old 06-12-2008, 07:10 PM
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well most importantly Glad your OKAY!! Fix it with parts from ebay/oem no body work cause you will not be satisfied once it's done unless your not picky or pay lots of money for a good job!!

Again glad your okay the wreck sucks they aways do!! lots of us been there done that got the fickin' marks to prove it!

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post #4 of 55 Old 06-12-2008, 07:33 PM
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Nobody's gonna fuss at ya. I bet most here have had similar experiences. I certainly did. The great thing is you were wearing your gear!!!! Way to go! Big rep points for that. As far as the bike goes, check with these guys http://www.servicehonda.com/ There are plenty of other places to get OEM parts (cue for others to post up links), they were just the ones I used and had no problems with whatsoever. I spent a little under $500 bucks to repair my 9 when I low-sided, along with probably another $200 for non-OEM upgrades.

Glad you are ok!!! If you feel any different after the adrenaline and Advil wear off, get checked out (voodoo's right--you're gonna be sore). And if you can't vent here, then what the heck good are we?!?

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post #5 of 55 Old 06-12-2008, 07:34 PM
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Glad to hear your O.K. Riding gear is a wonderful thing. I know I would have been in worse shape after my accident if it wasn't for it.

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post #6 of 55 Old 06-12-2008, 07:49 PM
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Glad to hear your ok and learning. The bike can be fixed and the lessons learned are priceless. Take it easy for a few days and then get back to it! As others have said, good job on the gear.

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post #7 of 55 Old 06-12-2008, 07:57 PM
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Fish, so sorry about your crash, but as you and others have said, great you had your gear on. I wear textile over-pants and jacket whenever I ride. Hot sometimes, but good insurance, as I am a newbie too. Glad you can remember things so clearly as it will keep you from getting in the same situation again.

Besides venting...you truly do the rest of us a great service by posting this. Reminds us all to be more careful and watch out for gravel and other road hazards. Hope your body heals quick and you're back in the saddle soon


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post #8 of 55 Old 06-12-2008, 09:10 PM
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That sucks, sorry you had to go through that. I honestly believed I would never crash after years and tens of thousands of miles, but it happens to experienced riders to. I won't ever forget that 2 second long feeling of losing control and knowing you're going to crash.

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post #9 of 55 Old 06-12-2008, 10:39 PM
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Kudos for surviving in full gear and for posting here! My wife is a newbie and your post and the following comments will be required reading tonight!!!

Glad to hear you are OK, yes it will ache tomorrow but so does a hangover right?

These lessons hurt but they sure do stick with you, it dosent matter how many times someone warns you of such incidents, until you do it yourself it is just a story right? Get back out there and REALLY learn to enjoy your safe riding habits!!


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post #10 of 55 Old 06-13-2008, 12:18 AM
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Lessons learned?

Good to hear you're still vertical and the bike's still functional. A bit "road warrior" looking, but functional.
Let's break it down.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fishfilet300 View Post
I was able to walk away so that probably leans towards the not so bad spectrum.
Definitely nearer the "not as bad as it could have been" end of the crash spectrum.
Quote:
I’m not sure if it was a high side or low, I still can’t tell the difference between the two.
From the list of damage, you probably lost the front end resulting in a low side. You'd have to experience a high side to believe it!
Quote:
Upon leaving the restaurant 5 minutes later I was coming up to a left turn. I couldn’t see all the way around so I consciously went wide right to increase visibility and delay my apex as I’ve read in Proficient Motorcycling. Then it happened……. When it came time to turn/lean I was over too much and was skirting the sand/gravel on the edge.
Book learnin' is all well and good, but in this case was part of the cause of the crash. It's referred to as target fixation: you were so busy trying to set up for the turn that you forgot the number one rule of riding -- where you are at the moment is the most important thing you have to deal with, with whatever is coming up running a close second.
Quote:
I’m not sure if it was a combination of too fast(probably), wrong place, or not enough experience, but I do know that I did have time to think,” straighten up” and “here we go!” before I was thrown and the bike went flying.
I'm sure about the last two. As for "too fast", only you can say for sure, but if you add "for my experience level" to it then I'd have to agree.
Quote:
I’m sure inexperience played a part but I don’t think years of experience could have avoided the ditch
Do not underestimate the power of years of experience -- which sometimes manifests itself as "new and creative ways to crash", but more usually prevents getting into the situation in the first place.
Quote:
and I remember saying, “Here we go” which may have allowed me to relax somewhat, because I distinctly remember seeing my hands hit the dirt.
A variation on target fixation -- crash fixation. It sounds for all the world like you let go of the bars as soon as you thought "here we go". In this case it may have saved you a broken collarbone if you were truly relaxed, whereas if you had hung on to the bars it may have slammed your shoulder into the dirt instead of your hands. Of course if you let go of the bars then a crash became a foregone conclusion! At least you kept your eyes open.
Quote:
I had the wind knocked out of me, which is scary unto itself, my visor had been ripped off, my tank bag was under me and I and the bike were in a gully.
Ouch. Nothing compares to trying to take a breath and not being able to. While the tankbag undoubtedly contributed to knocking the wind out of you, it may have saved you the experience of broken ribs. Replace the helmet. The face plant (torn off face shield) is enough to warrant it. your neck will probably be stiff for a couple days.
Quote:
If you think a crash is scary the second part is even more frightening. Realizing you are alone, on a road that is rarely used in the middle of nowhere, and getting dark. This part was the worst, I wasn’t sure if I was really ok, if my bike was working, and had no idea if I would be able to right it anyway.
I absolutely agree! It's even worse if you don't have the option of a cell phone.
Quote:
With the help of adrenaline and shock I was able to get the bike back up, pick out all the grass and dirt and survey the damage.
This is called "a more accurate assessment of serious injuries" and can sometimes result in further injuries, but luckily not in this case.

Again, congratulations on your relatively unscathed escape from The First Crash. Now, if you haven't already done so take a beginning rider course and make every ride a training session in the essential develpoment of your instincts. Between training, a little luck, and constantly giving riding your undivided attention, hopefully this will be the one and only crash.

Rob

If it has already been done, it is safe to assume it is possible to do it.
On the other hand, if it has not been done never assume it is impossible to do it.
------- Rob --------
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post #11 of 55 Old 06-13-2008, 12:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robtharalson View Post
where you are at the moment is the most important thing you have to deal with, with whatever is coming up running a close second.
Look through the corner, where you want to go, is a direct counter to "target fixation" is it not?

Seems to me that where you are is "done and gone", with trajectory being the most important facet...

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post #12 of 55 Old 06-13-2008, 03:40 AM
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Hey Fish - How is the ol' body feeling today? Sorry it happened!

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post #13 of 55 Old 06-13-2008, 03:52 AM
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Wow, sorry to hear about your accident. But thanks for the informative post; I'm so happy that you were able to get on the bike and ride home.
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post #14 of 55 Old 06-13-2008, 04:40 AM
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Damn. Brevity beat me to it. That site saved me $300 on a new tank alone. As long as you order parts for the right year, they all come painted and with original stickers. Just be sure to save the bushings and other hardware from the old stuff. It is reusable and saves you a buck or 2 here and there. Glad you were able to come here and tell us about what happened. Not to mention able to pick yourself up, dust off, and ride home. My first lay down was a duzzy of a low side (tires in front of you) just because I watched all the oil pour out of the holes in my stator cover.

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post #15 of 55 Old 06-13-2008, 05:17 AM
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Fell better and learn from what happened.And as you already know always wear your gear.

"When they discover the center of the universe, a lot of people will be disappointed to discover they are not it."
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post #16 of 55 Old 06-13-2008, 06:07 AM
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Thanks brevity I forgot mr cycles out of Ashville NC has give me great service and prices as well.


Like mister mike said how do you feel today??

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post #17 of 55 Old 06-13-2008, 07:11 AM
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I recall my first crash.... a pretty good highside at a nice clip at Road America... turn 6.... Low sides usually allow you time to think... high sides are typically "What the fuk... OH I AM FLYING...... this is cool...... OUCH.... that hurt.... wheres my...... UGH.... there it is!"

As said before clean up the bike, inspect for damage and get a parts list ready to go. While your at it... start the mods as well... no better time then whens shes already getting ripped apart!

I LOVE Tig Bitties!
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post #18 of 55 Old 06-13-2008, 07:21 AM
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Hey Fish, Welcome to the crash club. Very glad you wore gear and didn't get hurt worse! Yesterday I was discussing how the folks with great gear have fallen before and respect the risk. Good luck getting the bike spiffed out!

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post #19 of 55 Old 06-13-2008, 07:23 AM
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Sorry to hear of your mishap Fish, I'm just glad you're no wear for the worse. I have to agree with the others here that you more than likely experienced a "low side" A high side hurts much worse on the average (trust me on this one) and generally causes a LOT more damage to the bike and rider.

Kudo's on the gear, that's one of the main things I try to convey to every rider, even if they don't want to hear it.




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post #20 of 55 Old 06-13-2008, 07:33 AM
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Glad you're OK. Very similar thing happened to me almost a year ago and thank God I was able to walk away from it as well. I know how you feel man.

'02 Honda 919 - She's the only one for me!

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post #21 of 55 Old 06-13-2008, 08:35 AM
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Very happy to hear you are ok. Sorry to hear of the accident but you will be around to enjoy more days. Thats what matter most. Good luck getting the bike back on the road. It is a great time to add your personal touches.

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post #22 of 55 Old 06-13-2008, 08:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2000TJ View Post
Look through the corner, where you want to go, is a direct counter to "target fixation" is it not?

Seems to me that where you are is "done and gone", with trajectory being the most important facet...
My point exactly. Where you are is at a given instant is "done and gone", but the direction you're going, in this case onto the shoulder, is the important part. He was setting up for the corner and probably establishing a sight line through it, but never got there because the trajectory was wrong: a common novice mistake -- concentrating on where you want to be 10 seconds from now while forgetting where you will be 1 second from now. Classic target fixation.

Rob

If it has already been done, it is safe to assume it is possible to do it.
On the other hand, if it has not been done never assume it is impossible to do it.
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post #23 of 55 Old 06-13-2008, 09:01 AM
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Sorry to hear it happened but glad that it was relativley minor and your okay.

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post #24 of 55 Old 06-13-2008, 10:48 AM
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Sorry to hear this! Glad your ok. Ride safe guys.

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post #25 of 55 Old 06-13-2008, 04:55 PM
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Fish... let me add my congrats on walking away from a nasty mess. If there ever is a good crash... its the one you can walk away from. Glad to hear that you aren't ready to throw the baby out with the bath water.

Get her fixed back up and learn some more!

Take Care


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Remember when someone annoys you, that it takes 42 muscles in your face to frown ...
But it only takes 4 muscles to extend your arm and bitch-slap that mother- upside the head...

Pass it on.
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post #26 of 55 Old 06-13-2008, 05:26 PM
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Crash Club Membership Drive!

And our club gets bigger everyday.
Kinda like the 1st year for the ZRX. Retro look, not much plastic. Older and middle aged men bought them. Cheap Insurance. Then these older men started crashing and the insurance doubled the 1st year.
The Hornet is docile acting around town, quiet running, and smooth riding. But, when it gets in too deep, slick surface, or head shake, heck, it turns into a Jackass that has a mind of it's own.
My hands still hurt me every day!

[
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post #27 of 55 Old 06-13-2008, 05:53 PM
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Glad to hear you are pretty much okay, as stated good job on the gear. I am part of the been there done that group here. The bike can be fixed, may not be cheap but it can be fixed. It sucks but you will be a better/smarter rider for it. Hope you are not hurting too bad today and good luck making her pretty again.

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post #28 of 55 Old 06-13-2008, 06:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brokerecord View Post
The Hornet is docile acting around town, quiet running, and smooth riding. But, when it gets in too deep, slick surface, or head shake, heck, it turns into a Jackass that has a mind of it's own.
My hands still hurt me every day!
I've never had a bike feel so composed one second and so totally out of control the next. This is a very quick turning, light bike compared to what I've owned - if it doesnt like what you're doing, it'll let you know in the most heinous way.

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post #29 of 55 Old 06-13-2008, 08:08 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you everyone for the caring words. Yes today I am sore, left wrist , left hip, and lower back. I guess at 38 I'm just not as flexible as I used to be. I went to my chiropractor this morning to help with the back spasms. I keep re-winding the event in my head, was I target fixing?, too fast?, a stupid newbie? etc. then I read about Ratdog's friend Steve (my name also) it really hit home and broke down. Thinking how easily this could have been so much much worse. I am so very sorry about your friend Ratdog and may I encourage all of you to go to http://http://www.remembertheriders.com/

I went back to the scene today at lunch to take some picture so you guys could school me on what I did wrong or could have done better. Remember it was close to 8:00 when I crashed so shadows were longer and deeper. I didn't have any red solo cups to mark my entry points so I used 3 red-ish coffee creamers from work to highlight locations for you. The second to last image shows the final stopping place of the bike and me in teh background (shown with 2 creamers) I also have a video if anyone really wants to see the turn in actual time for soem real forensic investigation.

Lastly, some random bits: 1.) Yes I did take the MSF class, 2.) My visor was up which led to the rip off, no other signs of wear to the helmet, 3.) how can you tell if the forks are bent or calipers are damaged?

Again thank you everyone. I told everyone at work I fell from a ladder because I didn’t want to validate people’s fear that motorcycles are dangerous.
My prayers are with Steve’s wife and son.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg turn ahead.JPG (33.6 KB, 17 views)
File Type: jpg blind left.JPG (34.9 KB, 17 views)
File Type: jpg turn start.JPG (34.1 KB, 20 views)
File Type: jpg entry approach.JPG (34.4 KB, 16 views)
File Type: jpg entry point 1 &2.JPG (34.3 KB, 17 views)
File Type: jpg entry close up.JPG (38.5 KB, 24 views)
File Type: jpg skid marks.JPG (35.4 KB, 14 views)
File Type: jpg resting place.JPG (36.6 KB, 24 views)
File Type: jpg gully ditch.JPG (36.4 KB, 15 views)

There's your plan and then there's God's plan.........
Your's doesn't matter.
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post #30 of 55 Old 06-13-2008, 08:14 PM
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good advice about checking the front end out here. worked for me anyways.

https://www.wristtwisters.com/forum/s...xing+front+end

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post #31 of 55 Old 06-13-2008, 09:36 PM
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"Upon leaving the restaurant 5 minutes later I was coming up to a left turn. I couldn’t see all the way around so I consciously went wide right to increase visibility and delay my apex as I’ve read in Proficient Motorcycling. Then it happened……. When it came time to turn/lean I was over too much and was skirting the sand/gravel on the edge."

I think it's pretty obvious what went wrong - you tried to apply a tactic read from a book in a life situation. In other words, you got fancy. Everything I do on a motorcycle is about how it feels to me - no way would I bother reading someone else's take on how to take a turn.
I was due for a crash - I was absolutely wringing the 919's neck through 50 miles of rocky mountain twisties, keeping the revs between 6k and redline, and lost it around a sandy hairpin. I used the street as a racetrack for the nth time, and learned a valuable lesson. I've slowed down considerably since then - it doesnt sound like you have the same problem, you just need to learn to trust your instincts and feel how to ride instead of think how.
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post #32 of 55 Old 06-13-2008, 11:32 PM
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Glad to hear your Ok .. Had a similar wreck myself, low-side into a corner that i took too wide. In my case there were a few cement curbs involved, I still dont know who hit more of them ... me or my 9er. 3-400 bucks later i was back on the road and a bit wiser. You live and you learn. Recover, take your time and get your 9er back on the road. You will feel better once you start riding again. Oh and Midwest, that has to be the funniest (not funny) description of a high side I have ever heard. A good rule of thumb in determining a high side from a low side is - who is in front ( you or the bike ) ... Look to the community for help getting back on the road. There are a lot of people with spare parts willing to let them go to a fellow naked rider.

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post #33 of 55 Old 06-14-2008, 03:23 AM
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Glad your OK. And letting go was the best thing you could do.. I didn't let go and I payed the price dearly ..




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post #34 of 55 Old 06-14-2008, 03:28 AM
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It happens to the best of us...

I just bought a 919 the other day and hope this sort of thing will never ever happen to me...

It has in the past though. More times than I care to remember too. No matter how hard I concentrated and uttered the words in my mind "I'll never let that happen again", it does, and every time it catches you by surprise,, that's why they call them accidents...

My last bike, a VTR-1000 went down,, but not when and where I ever imagined. My pals called around and we all decided to go for a ride. I kept the VTR on front and rear axle stands. I was talking to my friend and took out the front stand, went to the back of the bike, tipped the bike up straight and turned to talk to my friend once again. Unknown to me, my brother pulled out the pin that went through the hollow rear axle as I held the bike upright by the tail piece. I felt the bike going away but didn't click,, until I heard the gut wrenching sound as it hit the deck. It's a sound that you never forget, even if the bike was stationary. I turned in horror to see my brother holding the pin in his hand with his mouth open and I was speechless, for a while. I eventually gathered my thoughts and gasped in horror, seeing the bike on its side. "What the f*#k do you think you are doing?" I yelled out and he replied something but I can't remember what. My baby was on the ground and I felt like dying...

What damage do it do..???

We all quickly picked it up and the motorcycle gods must have been watching over me because apart from the bent number plate, none of us found even the slightest mark, dent or even scratch. I had a small seat on casters I use when cleaning the bike and it was so positioned that the clutch cover landed on the vynil on the seat and the thin metal frame bent under the bikes weight. The front tyre was wedged against my brand new $300 Powerbuilt tool box which now as dented but no marks on the bike at all. I was expecting a dent or something to eventually show up but nope, not a one. I rode like a demon in those hills that day as I now knew this was the one time the bike would get away on me and I didn't have to worry about it again. I left the number plater slightly bent to remind me not to get too complacent ever again.. I felt somewhat bemused by that whole affair, but in the past I have done a lot worse and lost skin in the process... I've been over and under cars,, nearly got decapitated going through a barbed wire fence after running too wide on a corner and hitting the loose stuff and dumping the bike. I once crashed on a Friday night at the lights in the middle of town and rolled off the bike and into all the people waiting for the "Walk Now" lights to show up... Been there done that... The local hospital used to have a bed reserved just for me (just kidding). Believe it or not, I just carried on like it never happened, after I healed up each time...

I hope the agony doesn't last too long...

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post #35 of 55 Old 06-14-2008, 05:44 AM
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Fish any crash you can walk away from is a "good" crash. the best thing is you are ok. the bike can be fixed and the best part is that you learned a lot. the worst is when you wreck and don't take anything away from it.

UT VIVANT ALII...SO OTHERS MAY LIVE
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post #36 of 55 Old 06-14-2008, 06:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fishfilet300 View Post
I’m not sure if it was a high side or low, I still can’t tell the difference between the two.

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post #37 of 55 Old 06-14-2008, 06:29 AM
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Am I to assume this is a 2 lane road? There is no painted divider. Sounds like you got into the turn a little too hot, ran it in too deep before initiating the turn, became target fixated, maybe hit the brakes which stood up the bike, ran wide, then low sided. Your first reflex is to hit the brakes -Wrong - Instead, lean it over, give it a little more throttle, and look through the turn. Practice this maneuver over and over until it becomes automatic. Plan B - slow down before you enter a turn.

The 919 Helpful Topics has a link to check for bent forks. The calipers should be fine, look for any signs of leaking brake fluid.

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post #38 of 55 Old 06-14-2008, 09:04 AM
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Reading your story is almost like deja vu for me. I did the exact same thing with my 9'er about two months ago. Long sweeping left turn,hit gravel,then down in a ditch. I will totally blame mine on inexperiance. I was in the totally wrong position in the lane. Damage to my bike sounds about the same as yours. I did end up bending the left front fork tube so really check yours out. I have gotten all the replacement parts pretty much through this forum. The guys on here are great and always willing to help out. Good luck with the getting the bike back on the road.

I also totally agree with wearing the proper gear. Mine saved me from a mushed up face and a right side full of gravel and glass.

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post #39 of 55 Old 06-14-2008, 05:00 PM
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I think MisterMike nailed it. Mental error. I've seen it a half dozen times. Always in a spot that's easy to run off the road. I think something in the self concious says it's going to be better going straight off the road into the nice soft grass.

If I was going to add anything, be your own coach. Run the scenerio over in your mind before it happens.

I look at peg scraping and knee sliding a little differently than some others here. I think being able to do it installs the confidence to turn the bike very hard in a tight spot. Learn to lean the bike, way over. Keeps you safe. Even a sport touring tire has enough grip to get the pegs down.

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post #40 of 55 Old 06-14-2008, 06:00 PM Thread Starter
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I think Mr. Mike and pretty much everyone is correct. Yes it was a two lane road, but that doesn’t excuse my placement but does validate my reasoning to go wide. When I play the scenario over in my head I know I was squeezing my break as much as I could to scrub off speed before being bucked when the bike hit the ditch. It happened so fast leaning wasn't even an option or consideration for me which says INEXPERIENCE. I’m not sure how I could practice something like that without getting screwed in the process? Plus I'm not sure if leaning would have helped me or hurt more. Even “if” I did execute the left lean correctly on the first turn I think it would have just pointed me direct into the other side of the road for the following turn that was blind to the right. To add insult to injury, my Pazo break lever arrived today. A lot of good it does me now when I really need much bigger things. I’ll be sure to post pictures of the damage. Thanks again guys.

There's your plan and then there's God's plan.........
Your's doesn't matter.
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