waterwetter - Wrist Twisters
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 16 Old 07-21-2007, 08:05 PM Thread Starter
Back in the day
 
Hondad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Melbourne, FL
Posts: 270
Rep Power: 1
 
waterwetter

Thinking about converting to Waterwetter. In traffic the fan is running for a long time. In addition it takes some time for the temp to drop to normal. I thought that the Waterwetter might easy the load on the cooling system. Does anyone have experience with Waterwetter in motorcycles.

Hondad is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 16 Old 07-21-2007, 09:49 PM
Lethal with Whiffle-Bats
 
Caleb_I's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Florida
Posts: 209
Rep Power: 1
 
I wouldn't convert fully to waterwetter and water, but add the correct amount to your coolant, While this topic has been covered and there are many greatly different opinions,
You have to look at it as such, While the thermostat Does control the temp of the engine, by regulating fluid, The waterwetter will absorb and dissapate heat slightly faster,, so it isn't exactly keeping the engine cooler per say, but will keep the temp more stable, as the thermostat will be doing it's thing more often, causing your coolant to cycle slightly faster.

Caleb_I is offline  
post #3 of 16 Old 07-21-2007, 09:50 PM
Go'n So slow I'm stopped
 
xrmikey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 3,909
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Donation Donation Donation Donation 
Total Awards: 6

I believe I have heard Watter wetter kills water pumps.
Don't worry about the temp. 3/4 up is normal as Honda wants it.
As long as the fan is running all is good. Worry about the temp when the fan doesn't work.
I've ridden in 103 deg weather in the desert on my 919 without any problems at all.
The bike didn't even get sluggish.
If you want a great coolant use the factory BMW auto coolant.
It is built exclusively for protecting aluminum engines.
We run it in a XR650R and even in the hottest temps out in the desert we have yet to get it to run into the overflow.
With stock coolant it used to get a little warm and bubble in the overflow tank.

xrmikey is offline  
post #4 of 16 Old 07-21-2007, 10:01 PM
Lethal with Whiffle-Bats
 
Caleb_I's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Florida
Posts: 209
Rep Power: 1
 
Hehe,, i was about to edit when i saw mikey had pretty much covered what i was gonna add.. As far as it killing pumps,, I've never had any ill effect,, but as i said i've never ran it solely... in a bike at least,,I've used it in my 4 wheeled vehicles, one of them a high performance one,, and no ill effects... but due to the warnings i've only added a ratio to the coolant...

And, +1 to the BMW coolant!!

Caleb_I is offline  
post #5 of 16 Old 07-21-2007, 11:42 PM
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 1,379
Rep Power: 0
 
You should read this thread: Click Me!!!

motorwerks919 is offline  
post #6 of 16 Old 07-22-2007, 12:22 AM
Corner speed sets u free
 
streakin919's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Pacific NW
Posts: 1,115
Rep Power: 1
 
Garage

Awards Showcase
Trackday Recognition Donation Veteran 
Total Awards: 3

something else to consider. There was a post where someone hooked up a manual switch for the fan on the 919, so if you know you're coming up on stop and go traffic you can swtich the fan on early and control the temp that way. I haven't tried this but it might be worth looking into.

streakin919 is offline  
post #7 of 16 Old 07-22-2007, 01:36 AM
Church of the Holy Smoke
 
MotoCycho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: SLC, UT
Posts: 1,085
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caleb_I View Post
... While the thermostat Does control the temp of the engine, by regulating fluid, The waterwetter will absorb and dissapate heat slightly faster,, so it isn't exactly keeping the engine cooler per say, but will keep the temp more stable, as the thermostat will be doing it's thing more often, causing your coolant to cycle slightly faster.
This is incorrect. The thermostat does not regulate or control engine temperature in anyway. The purpose of a thermostat is to prevent or limit the flow of coolant through the engine to hasten engine warm-up. Once the engine has reached it's normal (minimum) operating temperature, a correctly functioning thermostat with be fully open and allow the coolant to flow unrestricted. The thermostat only does it's job once per engine run/heat cycle, unless you start the engine again before it has cooled enough to close the thermostat. Think about it, the thermostat opens at between 180 and 195 °F, depending on the thermostat you have installed. The engine coolant temperature will never drop low enough to allow a thermostat to close while the engine is running, once the engine has reach it's normal temperature. The only exception might be in extreme winter weather, but hardly applies to a motorcycle. According to the Honda 919 Service manual, the thermostat starts to open at 80 - 84 °C (176 - 183 °F) and is fully open at 95 °C. Regulating the temperature of the engine is the job of the coolant being circulated through the cooling system. It pulls the heat away from engine at the radiator by transferring the heat to air being pushed through the radiator. The fan comes on to assist with air volume if the bike is not moving fast enough on it's own. That's what regulates engine temperature, not the thermostat. Furthermore, if the engine coolant is capable of absorbing more heat and transferring more heat away from the engine, then the engine is cooler. I can definitely attest to the improved cooling that Engine Ice provides. My engine ran cooler.

Now I will weigh in the water wetter / Engine Ice debate. Unless you have to run it, i.e you are on a race track, don't! The benefit of running just slightly cooler is not worth the cost of replacing your water pump every 3000 miles, which is how long my water pump lasted after I switched to Engine Ice. I have not personally tried Water Wetter, but have heard of the same results happening from other Wrist Twister members, (read the entire thread motorwerks919 references). That said, do what ya want!

- Rev. CYCHO -

tires.... it's what's for dinner!
MotoCycho is offline  
post #8 of 16 Old 07-22-2007, 05:28 AM
Milites Gregarius
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Shreveport, LA
Posts: 169
Rep Power: 1
 
I've used water wetter in the past on a few cars. Water wetter has a distinct flaw, the chemicals inside it like to make the small amount of lubrication in antifreese clump together causing a strain on your water pump and cloging your thermostat. After a while your coolant expansion tank will look like it has oil floating around in it. So in general, if your not using it in a full blown track bike or drag car you need to stay away from it. If your bike is over heating you need to find the real problem and not cover it up with "magic-juice".

mrjason is offline  
post #9 of 16 Old 07-22-2007, 10:09 AM Thread Starter
Back in the day
 
Hondad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Melbourne, FL
Posts: 270
Rep Power: 1
 
Thanks,

Not worth the risk.

As always you guys have been a great help. I really appreciate the help and advice.

Hondad is offline  
post #10 of 16 Old 07-22-2007, 10:13 AM
Wookie
 
ragdoll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 7,274
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Donation 
Total Awards: 1

Waterwetter cost me a master seal on the water pump with my bike. It also gave me gonorrhea.

'02 RC-51
'10 Unicycle

ragdoll is offline  
post #11 of 16 Old 07-22-2007, 10:26 AM Thread Starter
Back in the day
 
Hondad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Melbourne, FL
Posts: 270
Rep Power: 1
 
Here is an additional site that may be of some elucidation.


www.calsci.com/motorcycleinfo/FilterXRef.html - 58k

Hondad is offline  
post #12 of 16 Old 07-22-2007, 01:39 PM
TrackXperience Pusher!
 
Jayfooey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Victorville, Ca.
Posts: 300
Rep Power: 1
 
I'll chime in since I ran straight water wetter/water mixture in my 919 for 10k plus miles until I sold the bike. I had no problems with it at all even doing track days at over 110f in the nevada desert.

In my new 07 GSX-R 750, I put Water wetter/water mixture in it at 250miles it now has 4,600 miles on the clock, and again no problems...

with any vehicle/motorcycle, you have to do regular maintance, I have and will flush the coolant... water wetter/water mixture out and put fresh coolant in my automobiles... waterwetter/water mixture in my motorcycle...

K7 GSX-R 750 for racing only
2006 YZ250 for getting dirty

www.TrackXperience.com

WSMC #689
Jayfooey is offline  
post #13 of 16 Old 07-22-2007, 09:17 PM
Lethal with Whiffle-Bats
 
Caleb_I's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Florida
Posts: 209
Rep Power: 1
 
See, lots of mixed results man,, lots..!! its your own risk man!! hehe...

about the thermostat.. wouldn't regulating the flow of coolant... er... regulate the amount of heat transfer of the given flow of coolant? I might be mistaken on that, but I thought that's how it worked? and yes i agree, in the blazing hot days of summer and heat, that pup is probably wide open once it's warmed up

Caleb_I is offline  
post #14 of 16 Old 07-22-2007, 11:33 PM
Church of the Holy Smoke
 
MotoCycho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: SLC, UT
Posts: 1,085
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caleb_I View Post
about the thermostat.. wouldn't regulating the flow of coolant... er... regulate the amount of heat transfer of the given flow of coolant? I might be mistaken on that, but I thought that's how it worked? and yes i agree, in the blazing hot days of summer and heat, that pup is probably wide open once it's warmed up
The thermostat does not regulate anything. It simply starts to open at a specified temp and is fully open soon after at a slightly higher temp. It only hastens warming of the engine by "limiting" flow for a brief warm-up period. The word "regulate" implies that it continues to somehow control flow throughout the drive cycle, which it does not. Unless it's really really cold, say sub-freezing temps and you are flowing enough air through your radiator to draw enough heat out of the coolant to lower the coolant below the temperature rating of the thermostat, it is fully open and stays that way. It would have to be very very cold and you would have to be moving at freeway speeds. I would imagine it would need to also be a large cooling system that you see on commercial trucks or maybe full sized pickups.. but only in the coldest months. I block part of my trucks radiator to keep the heater blowing warm air during the winter months... so yes.. it is possible to draw too much heat out of the coolant.. but I seriously doubt the t-stat is actually closed or even partially closed. even 195 °F is cooler than actual normal running temps in winter driving.

I did a Google search for the term "how does an auto thermostat work" and found "How does the thermostat in a car's cooling system work?", and "A Short Course on Cooling Systems", which states "A thermostat is placed between the engine and the radiator to make sure that the coolant stays above a certain preset temperature." That basically sums up what I am saying right there. The thermostat does not regulate the flow of coolant to control engine temperature. It simply ensures a minimum temperature by restricting flow until the engine has warmed up. I know it seems like a lot of semantics, but it's a more accurate description of what it does.

- Rev. CYCHO -

tires.... it's what's for dinner!
MotoCycho is offline  
post #15 of 16 Old 07-23-2007, 07:10 AM
Heavy Metal
 
ratdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: swamp in the wood
Posts: 4,304
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Donation Extraordinary Ride Donation Wrist Twisters Event Attendance 
Total Awards: 5

i used water wetter for a single track event...

flushed b4 & after....the 9'rs water pump started to weep & i replaced it (eventually)

still have the old one, guess i could open up the pump and see what's what, but just spinning it i could hear there was a problem

ratdog is offline  
post #16 of 16 Old 07-23-2007, 09:42 PM
Lethal with Whiffle-Bats
 
Caleb_I's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Florida
Posts: 209
Rep Power: 1
 
Well I've ran the water wetter/coolant ratio for a few years,, and about to flush the system,, I'll check and see what he condition of mine is...

Thanks for the info motocycho, I am well aware of how a t-stat works, and not trying to argue the point,, on one of my 4 wheeled vehicles, I've got a koyo racing radiator, (which is huge) and dual fal fans, when flushing the system, I've just noticed that the flow would vary depending on how hot the fluid was after it went back into the block, so just using rationalization, I figured the thing was constantly regulating the flow.

Caleb_I is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Wrist Twisters forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome