Valve clearance specs? - Wrist Twisters
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 53 Old 11-21-2006, 05:43 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 14
Rep Power: 0
 
Valve clearance specs?

Hi all...my first post. I bought a 2003 919 recently and have been reading this forum. Excellent info. Can someone tell me the valve clearance specs? I ordered a manual but it seems to be on the slow boat (I'm in Hawaii).

Here's a photo. http://www.tkpowell.com/temp/my919.jpg
So far I've added braided front lines, removed the flapper and pairs system. Next up will be a set of F4i forks and Satos. I also have a VTR and the 919 seems to be a bit lighter and just as powerful. The VTR does have a more planted feel but the forks have been reworked with an Ohlins in the rear.

Aloha
--Terry

konatkp is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 53 Old 11-21-2006, 05:59 PM
Tribunus Laticlavius
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Northern California
Posts: 7,109
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Donation Donation Donation 
Total Awards: 3

Intake 0.16 +/- 0.03mm
Exhaust 0.25 +/- 0.03mm

Supposedly you can DL the manual (not just generic) from the honda rider's club site. Don't know how you could make that adjustment for the first time w/o the SM. What's the pairs system upgrade?

dream is offline  
post #3 of 53 Old 11-21-2006, 06:02 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 14
Rep Power: 0
 
Re: Pairs
I just removed everything and made some plates for the valve cover.

konatkp is offline  
post #4 of 53 Old 11-21-2006, 06:19 PM
Ken
Community Admin
 
Ken's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: New York
Posts: 4,396
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Extraordinary Ride Donation Extraordinary Ride Donation 
Total Awards: 4

Welcome aboard, kona. I'm planning to rip out the PAIR over the Winter. Any tips, hints, gotchas that you can share? My buddy is fabricating some covers. Seems pretty simple. Hope it kills the popping on decel.

2009 Honda Goldwing
Four wheels move the body. Two wheels move the soul.
Ken is offline  
post #5 of 53 Old 11-21-2006, 06:56 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 14
Rep Power: 0
 
Hi Ken,

If you use the gaskets under the pairs outlets on the manifold, you will need to remove the screws that hold the reed valves so your plates sit flat. I used a small pair of vice grips as the phillip heads strip out easily. Other than blocking off the hose that enters the rear of the air box, that's about it.

--Terry

konatkp is offline  
post #6 of 53 Old 11-21-2006, 07:33 PM
Tribunus Laticlavius
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Northern California
Posts: 7,109
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Donation Donation Donation 
Total Awards: 3

More pairs info. No performance improvement, but clears the way for valve access.

https://www.wristtwisters.com/forum/s...ead.php?t=1995

How many miles are on it to motivate checking the valves?

dream is offline  
post #7 of 53 Old 11-21-2006, 07:58 PM
Hola Como Estas?
 
ramrod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Ewa Beach, HI
Posts: 149
Rep Power: 1
 
You live on the Big Island Kona?

ramrod is offline  
post #8 of 53 Old 11-21-2006, 08:27 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 14
Rep Power: 0
 
Yes, I live about 2 miles above Kailua. Moved here from Oregon in 1998.

konatkp is offline  
post #9 of 53 Old 11-21-2006, 09:58 PM
Hola Como Estas?
 
ramrod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Ewa Beach, HI
Posts: 149
Rep Power: 1
 
Right on, I live on O'ahu and moved here from Astoria, OR a couple months ago. If the skipper lets us bring our Bikes onboard, I might have to hook up w/ you for some riding on the Big Island.

ramrod is offline  
post #10 of 53 Old 11-21-2006, 10:15 PM
Primus Pilus
 
BockHawk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Normal, IL
Posts: 3,432
Rep Power: 1
 
Garage
Is it bad that I have 23,000 miles and I've never done a valve check?

2002 919 40,000 miles
"racing is life...everything else is just waiting"
BockHawk is offline  
post #11 of 53 Old 11-22-2006, 04:04 AM
Ken
Community Admin
 
Ken's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: New York
Posts: 4,396
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Extraordinary Ride Donation Extraordinary Ride Donation 
Total Awards: 4

Thanks Terry. Thanks dream.

2009 Honda Goldwing
Four wheels move the body. Two wheels move the soul.
Ken is offline  
post #12 of 53 Old 11-22-2006, 05:31 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 14
Rep Power: 0
 
Ramrod - by all means, give me a buzz if you can make it to the BI.
329-9740 Some great riding here and I have plenty of (I hesitate to use the word) crash space. :-)

--Terry
http://www.tkpowell.com/temp/9891.jpg

konatkp is offline  
post #13 of 53 Old 11-22-2006, 08:56 AM
Tribunus Laticlavius
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Northern California
Posts: 7,109
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Donation Donation Donation 
Total Awards: 3

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bock919 View Post
Is it bad that I have 23,000 miles and I've never done a valve check?
The SM schedule it to inspect at 16,000. Initial tolerance shifts could reduce compression and performance. Interesting the maintenance schedule doesn't ever say to replace the timing chain or cam sprockets. Honda wants you to buy a new bike before they wear out.

dream is offline  
post #14 of 53 Old 11-22-2006, 09:07 AM
Legatus Legionis
 
SV650s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The woods of CT
Posts: 9,680
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Community Leadership Donation Donation Community Leadership 
Total Awards: 6

Explain how the compression would be reduced with initial valve to cam clearance shifts???

SV650s is offline  
post #15 of 53 Old 11-22-2006, 09:12 AM
Tribunus Laticlavius
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Northern California
Posts: 7,109
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Donation Donation Donation 
Total Awards: 3

m51142,

My thought was if the valves are not snugly seated it would compromise cylinder pressure. What are your thoughts on the detriment of out of spec valves?

dream is offline  
post #16 of 53 Old 11-22-2006, 09:46 AM
Legatus Legionis
 
SV650s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The woods of CT
Posts: 9,680
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Community Leadership Donation Donation Community Leadership 
Total Awards: 6

Quote:
Originally Posted by dream247919 View Post
m51142,

My thought was if the valves are not snugly seated it would compromise cylinder pressure. What are your thoughts on the detriment of out of spec valves?
The valves will always close. Compression will be compromised if their is leakage past the rings or to a much lesser extent burnt exhaust seats. Neither of these conditions will be caused by valve to poor cam tolerances.

SV650s is offline  
post #17 of 53 Old 11-22-2006, 09:57 AM
Tribunus Laticlavius
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Northern California
Posts: 7,109
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Donation Donation Donation 
Total Awards: 3

Quote:
Originally Posted by m51142 View Post
The valves will always close. Compression will be compromised if their is leakage past the rings or to a much lesser extent burnt exhaust seats. Neither of these conditions will be caused by valve to poor cam tolerances.
I appreciate your correction! I wonder how much they need to be out of alignment before "touching" the piston.

dream is offline  
post #18 of 53 Old 11-22-2006, 11:12 AM
Tribuni Angusticlavii
 
ajcombs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 3,801
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Helping a Member in Need 
Total Awards: 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bock919 View Post
Is it bad that I have 23,000 miles and I've never done a valve check?
Correct me please! but i was thinking that if the shims wore past the Tolerance no big deal just that the valves would not open as much. Not allowing the engine to breath as well and not make as much power as it could....?????

ajcombs is offline  
post #19 of 53 Old 11-22-2006, 12:51 PM
Church of the Holy Smoke
 
MotoCycho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: SLC, UT
Posts: 1,085
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dream247919 View Post
I appreciate your correction! I wonder how much they need to be out of alignment before "touching" the piston.

Um.. huh? Why would they touch the piston? The adjustment is the lash between the cam and the top of the valve stem.. or in the case of the 919 engine the cam follower or "lifter" which is of the bucket/shim type. Clearly you don't have a full understanding of how this works. I'm not saying that's bad or wrong, I'm just saying continue your research. Perhaps you should start that adventure by removing your engine and disassembling it.


- Rev. CYCHO -

tires.... it's what's for dinner!
MotoCycho is offline  
post #20 of 53 Old 11-22-2006, 12:53 PM
Church of the Holy Smoke
 
MotoCycho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: SLC, UT
Posts: 1,085
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajcombs View Post
Correct me please! but i was thinking that if the shims wore past the Tolerance no big deal just that the valves would not open as much. Not allowing the engine to breath as well and not make as much power as it could....?????
BINGO! ...well.... except it is sort of a big deal if you want all that pesky power and stuff.

- Rev. CYCHO -

tires.... it's what's for dinner!
MotoCycho is offline  
post #21 of 53 Old 11-22-2006, 01:01 PM
Legatus Legionis
 
SV650s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The woods of CT
Posts: 9,680
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Community Leadership Donation Donation Community Leadership 
Total Awards: 6

Quote:
Originally Posted by dream247919 View Post
I appreciate your correction! I wonder how much they need to be out of alignment before "touching" the piston.
Alignment or the lack of is not a issue. For the valves to hit a piston the cam chain would have to jump a few teeth and maybe even then their might not be a collision. Also read motocycho's reply...

SV650s is offline  
post #22 of 53 Old 11-22-2006, 01:10 PM
Tribunus Laticlavius
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Northern California
Posts: 7,109
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Donation Donation Donation 
Total Awards: 3

Quote:
Originally Posted by MotoCycho View Post
Um.. huh? Why would they touch the piston? The adjustment is the lash between the cam and the top of the valve stem.. or in the case of the 919 engine the cam follower or "lifter" which is of the bucket/shim type. Clearly you don't have a full understanding of how this works. I'm not saying that's bad or wrong, I'm just saying continue your research. Perhaps you should start that adventure by removing your engine and disassembling it.

Thank you for continuing my education, that valve adjustments are for optimal performance. I'll take it apart in a few thousand miles for a looksee.

dream is offline  
post #23 of 53 Old 11-22-2006, 01:30 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 14
Rep Power: 0
 
My understanding of valve clearance is the following -
You need a minimum clearance at operating temps so the valves seat completely. If they don't, you'll burn the valve and the seat plus lose compression. Valves are kept cool by transfering their heat through the valve seat and into the head. Also the clearance is reduced over time as the valve face and seat wear (valve pushes higher up into the head). If you're looking at a 16K interval and you start with a clearance less than the minimum, the wear might be enough to prevent the valve from seating and it will reduce the amount of time it can transfer heat to the head. Also you don't want the clearance too much as this will cause excessive wear, clatter etc. There is also the issue of valve timing. If the clearances are too tight, your valves are staying open too long, reducing low end response. Too loose and you don't get enough duration for top end performance. If one valve is out of whack, that cylinder will not perform as well as the others that are in spec.

--Terry

konatkp is offline  
post #24 of 53 Old 11-22-2006, 01:50 PM
Tribunus Laticlavius
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Northern California
Posts: 7,109
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Donation Donation Donation 
Total Awards: 3

Excellent explanation Terry! Thank you!

dream is offline  
post #25 of 53 Old 11-22-2006, 03:17 PM
Church of the Holy Smoke
 
MotoCycho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: SLC, UT
Posts: 1,085
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by konatkp View Post
My understanding of valve clearance is the following -
You need a minimum clearance at operating temps so the valves seat completely. If they don't, you'll burn the valve and the seat plus lose compression. Valves are kept cool by transfering their heat through the valve seat and into the head. Also the clearance is reduced over time as the valve face and seat wear (valve pushes higher up into the head). If you're looking at a 16K interval and you start with a clearance less than the minimum, the wear might be enough to prevent the valve from seating and it will reduce the amount of time it can transfer heat to the head. Also you don't want the clearance too much as this will cause excessive wear, clatter etc. There is also the issue of valve timing. If the clearances are too tight, your valves are staying open too long, reducing low end response. Too loose and you don't get enough duration for top end performance. If one valve is out of whack, that cylinder will not perform as well as the others that are in spec.

--Terry

If you think about it, the valves are getting rid of most of the heat when a fresh blast of air comes into the cyl. (i.e. intake valve opens up). Plus the oil circulating around the valve train may help a bit in maintaining temps. I seriously can't see the contact of the valve components doing a lot for cooling. Scavenging the exhaust faster also pulls the heat out quicker reducing the combustion camber temps. Although it doesn't apply to motorcycle engines.. at least this one or any I can think of... EGR systems on cars are designed to reduce oxides of nitrogen emissions. They do this by reducing the combustion temps and not re-burning the gases as is a common myth. My point, you get more effective combustion cooling through managing the gases in and out of the engine than by conduction of heat through the contact of the bits past normal circulation of engine coolant. Any cooling through the valve train, is marginal, at best. Besides.. the friction of the two pieces of metal pounding into each other may generate more heat.

My .02 cents

- Rev. CYCHO -

tires.... it's what's for dinner!
MotoCycho is offline  
post #26 of 53 Old 11-22-2006, 03:44 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 14
Rep Power: 0
 
Sheesss...you mean I have to actually google instead of just talking out my ass. :-) The first thing I ran across when looking up 'exhaust valve cooling'
Airplane engines but the same principle...
http://www.sacskyranch.com/bvalve.htm

--Terry

konatkp is offline  
post #27 of 53 Old 11-22-2006, 04:10 PM
Church of the Holy Smoke
 
MotoCycho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: SLC, UT
Posts: 1,085
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by konatkp View Post
Sheesss...you mean I have to actually google instead of just talking out my ass. :-) The first thing I ran across when looking up 'exhaust valve cooling'
Airplane engines but the same principle...
http://www.sacskyranch.com/bvalve.htm

--Terry
Honestly I thought you were referring to the contact at the valve stem. Thing is though.. ultimately, this article reverts back to air fuel mixture as the primary way to control heat, which is exactly what I meant by managing the gases in and out. Lean = more heat. Rich = less. This is why I used the EGR example. The presents of exhaust gases in the mixture reduces the overall combustible gases and thereby reduces heat. Personally, I think EGR systems are inefficient, but I am not an engineer. I get the point about the valve and the valve seat contact to reduce the exhaust valve's temperature right where it seals. This only draws enough heat to effect the very edges of the valve, not a significant amount of heat from the engine. The only way to balance this minute amount of heat that is, admittedly, critical to valve longevity, is to managing the air/fuel mixture. So basically, you can burn valves by running too lean because you could move the heat buildup at the valve seat to a higher threshold than the minimal cooling effect of the contact of the valve to the seat can provide. Cool.. I learnt something new. Still. The vast majority of engine heat is managed elsewhere. I misunderstood you when I misread your post. Now you understand me.

- Rev. CYCHO -

tires.... it's what's for dinner!
MotoCycho is offline  
post #28 of 53 Old 11-22-2006, 05:36 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 14
Rep Power: 0
 
No real disagreement. There are a bunch of factors in cooling, any one of which could zing your motor if not within specs. BTW I have a friend here who recently sold his 93 900RR that had 153K miles on it and still running good. I also had a 93 with 40K on it when I sold it to a friend in Seattle who then raced it for 3 seasons. Never had to adjust the valves (I or he). He eventually wadded it big time at Thunderhill (N Calif). I think these 900 motors are pretty bullet proof if taken care of. Happy T Day to all --Terry

konatkp is offline  
post #29 of 53 Old 11-22-2006, 06:07 PM
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 107
Rep Power: 0
 

Awards Showcase
Veteran 
Total Awards: 1

Yeah, tear that engine completely apart. It is so much easier to put it back together again than it is to disassemble. You'll learn a lot in the process, too.

For example, instead of just saying, "@#@**#*@)(*," you will learn how to say, "()@$)(&_(@)#&$)(&[email protected]()&#$_)(@&#_$()&_#()$&_)@(&#$. " It's a highly motivating opportunity to expand your firsthand knowledge on the practical application of swearing like a sailor. Best thing about it, too, is that you only need a few simple hand tools like a hammer, and vice grips to complete the mission. Don't worry about nit-pick things like cam timing, and piston ring gap, and all that techy garbage. The whole point of it is just to have fun in your garage.

Additionally, it can be quite rewarding to tear that mill down and reassemble it time and again until you can do it blindfolded, and under 30 seconds. You'll see.....

Semper Fi, Mac.

0231

rickmears is offline  
post #30 of 53 Old 11-22-2006, 08:32 PM
Tribunus Laticlavius
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Northern California
Posts: 7,109
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Donation Donation Donation 
Total Awards: 3

Quote:
I learnt something new.
+10. Thanks for the debate! This site rules!

dream is offline  
post #31 of 53 Old 11-23-2006, 05:43 AM
Curmudgeon
 
semi_gray's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 899
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Donation Donation Veteran 
Total Awards: 3

Quote:
Originally Posted by konatkp View Post
Valves are kept cool by transferring their heat through the valve seat and into the head.
--Terry
Moto,
Terry is referring to keeping the valve head cool, not reducing the temperature of the entire engine. The metal to metal "conductive" heat transfer is far more efficient at shedding heat than the other two types of heat transfer, that is, "radiant" and "convective".
So if the valve clearance is set properly, the exhaust valve, the hotter of the two, gets a chance to stay in contact long enough to shed enough heat into the relatively cool cylinder head. You are correct about the intake valve being cooled by the rush of intake air etc. This is why it's rare to see a "burnt" intake valve.
I realize in the earlier post you say you get the part about the valve seat etc. and I’m not trying to be a smart a$$ here, but that small rim out at the circumference of the valve seat has a surprising amount of surface area.

semi_gray is offline  
post #32 of 53 Old 11-23-2006, 07:02 AM
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 227
Rep Power: 0
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by konatkp View Post
My understanding of valve clearance is the following -
You need a minimum clearance at operating temps so the valves seat completely. If they don't, you'll burn the valve and the seat plus lose compression. Valves are kept cool by transfering their heat through the valve seat and into the head. Also the clearance is reduced over time as the valve face and seat wear (valve pushes higher up into the head). If you're looking at a 16K interval and you start with a clearance less than the minimum, the wear might be enough to prevent the valve from seating and it will reduce the amount of time it can transfer heat to the head. Also you don't want the clearance too much as this will cause excessive wear, clatter etc. There is also the issue of valve timing. If the clearances are too tight, your valves are staying open too long, reducing low end response. Too loose and you don't get enough duration for top end performance. If one valve is out of whack, that cylinder will not perform as well as the others that are in spec.

--Terry
Quote:
Originally Posted by MotoCycho View Post
If you think about it, the valves are getting rid of most of the heat when a fresh blast of air comes into the cyl. (i.e. intake valve opens up). Plus the oil circulating around the valve train may help a bit in maintaining temps. I seriously can't see the contact of the valve components doing a lot for cooling. Scavenging the exhaust faster also pulls the heat out quicker reducing the combustion camber temps. Although it doesn't apply to motorcycle engines.. at least this one or any I can think of... EGR systems on cars are designed to reduce oxides of nitrogen emissions. They do this by reducing the combustion temps and not re-burning the gases as is a common myth. My point, you get more effective combustion cooling through managing the gases in and out of the engine than by conduction of heat through the contact of the bits past normal circulation of engine coolant. Any cooling through the valve train, is marginal, at best. Besides.. the friction of the two pieces of metal pounding into each other may generate more heat.

My .02 cents
Jeez y'all, I went with the 'Flux Capacitor' option on my '05 and I don't have to worry about any of this at all. See if you can pick one up on Ebay.

Kahuna is offline  
post #33 of 53 Old 11-23-2006, 08:22 AM
Tribunus Laticlavius
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Northern California
Posts: 7,109
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Donation Donation Donation 
Total Awards: 3

Nice points! Thermodynamics was a very tough class so it's great to see the practical application of exhaust valve cooling. Even given Honda's very low service rate of 16,000 miles we still need to check the valves.

That aircraft engine article makes a couple interesting points.

)Don't run your engine too lean and risk burning your valves.

)Only 1/3 of the chamber explosion energy turns the shaft, 2/3 of it is byproduct heat and dissipates into air. We need a synthetic fuel that burns cool and an efficient frictionless engine. Maybe when gas is $10/gallon.

dream is offline  
post #34 of 53 Old 11-23-2006, 09:30 AM
Legatus Legionis
 
SV650s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The woods of CT
Posts: 9,680
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Community Leadership Donation Donation Community Leadership 
Total Awards: 6

Sheesh... Too much technical mumbo-jumbo!
How about calculations for the swept volume of a cylinder? Want advise on how -to fabricate racing pistons from blanks, cut valve pockets, cc combustion chambers, calculate and set compression ratios, slipper and balance pistons to within 0.01 grams including pins and retainers? Bottom line, I ain't making no more freekin' pistons![/rant]

SV650s is offline  
post #35 of 53 Old 11-23-2006, 01:37 PM
Curmudgeon
 
semi_gray's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 899
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Donation Donation Veteran 
Total Awards: 3

Quote:
Originally Posted by m51142 View Post
Sheesh... Too much technical mumbo-jumbo!
How about calculations for the swept volume of a cylinder? Want advise on how -to fabricate racing pistons from blanks, cut valve pockets, cc combustion chambers, calculate and set compression ratios, slipper and balance pistons to within 0.01 grams including pins and retainers? Bottom line, I ain't making no more freekin' pistons![/rant]
You gonna be OK man?

semi_gray is offline  
post #36 of 53 Old 11-23-2006, 01:47 PM
Church of the Holy Smoke
 
MotoCycho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: SLC, UT
Posts: 1,085
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by semi_gray View Post
Moto,
Terry is referring to keeping the valve head cool, not reducing the temperature of the entire engine. The metal to metal "conductive" heat transfer is far more efficient at shedding heat than the other two types of heat transfer, that is, "radiant" and "convective".
So if the valve clearance is set properly, the exhaust valve, the hotter of the two, gets a chance to stay in contact long enough to shed enough heat into the relatively cool cylinder head. You are correct about the intake valve being cooled by the rush of intake air etc. This is why it's rare to see a "burnt" intake valve.
I realize in the earlier post you say you get the part about the valve seat etc. and I’m not trying to be a smart a$$ here, but that small rim out at the circumference of the valve seat has a surprising amount of surface area.
Yeah.. I got it. I wasn't reading his post word for word. I just blasted by it in a glance and misunderstood. This is more to do with valve grind angle though. If your valve adjustment or lash is so tight that your valves are not properly sealing then you will have a much bigger problem.. like a dead hole. Lack of compression will be the biggest issue, not valve seat surface contact for proper valve cooling.

I checked my valve lash clearances very carefully and followed the service manual exactly, right down to the making the little key to lock the cam chain tensioner. I did mine at about 17,300 miles.. every single single valve measured within spec. I am not the only one who has reported this. I have yet to read about someone needing to actually make any adjustments at the 16k interval on the 919 lump.

All this talk about what can happen if it's off is funny since the chances of us needing even a slight adjustment are slim at best.

- Rev. CYCHO -

tires.... it's what's for dinner!
MotoCycho is offline  
post #37 of 53 Old 11-29-2006, 09:23 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 14
Rep Power: 0
 
FWIW...I completed checking the valve clearance on the 919. All intakes were .006-.007 and exhausts were .010-.011 except one which was .009...still in spec. The new plates covering the pairs openings made it much easier to re-install the cover. http://www.tkpowell.com/temp/valvecover.jpg

--Terry

konatkp is offline  
post #38 of 53 Old 11-29-2006, 09:40 AM
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 96
Rep Power: 0
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MotoCycho View Post
I did mine at about 17,300 miles.. every single single valve measured within spec. I am not the only one who has reported this. I have yet to read about someone needing to actually make any adjustments at the 16k interval on the 919 lump.
+1 didn't need a single adjustment on mine.

ajohn505 is offline  
post #39 of 53 Old 01-01-2007, 03:46 PM
Curmudgeon
 
semi_gray's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 899
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Donation Donation Veteran 
Total Awards: 3

Ok, I'm inspired.
I just returned from the garage pulling things off my bike in preparation for the dreaded valve clearance check.
I'm only a thankful away from the 16k mark, but I figured while it's put away for the winter, I'd better get to it.
So after removal of the valve cover, I'd have to say that the PAIRS removal is in order. I'm sure that getting that valve cover back in with block-off plates will be a LOT easier!
I need to make the "key" tomorrow @ work and get to work on the plates. I'll let you all know what I find for clearances.

I plan to die young, as late as possible.
semi_gray is offline  
post #40 of 53 Old 01-01-2007, 04:08 PM
Church of the Holy Smoke
 
MotoCycho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: SLC, UT
Posts: 1,085
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by semi_gray View Post
Ok, I'm inspired.
I just returned from the garage pulling things off my bike in preparation for the dreaded valve clearance check.
I'm only a thankful away from the 16k mark, but I figured while it's put away for the winter, I'd better get to it.
So after removal of the valve cover, I'd have to say that the PAIRS removal is in order. I'm sure that getting that valve cover back in with block-off plates will be a LOT easier!
I need to make the "key" tomorrow @ work and get to work on the plates. I'll let you all know what I find for clearances.
I already know what your clearances are.

Dead, on, perfect!


- Rev. CYCHO -

tires.... it's what's for dinner!
MotoCycho is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Wrist Twisters forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome