Q about oil drain plug on 919 - Wrist Twisters
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post #1 of 39 Old 03-10-2014, 09:00 PM Thread Starter
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Q about oil drain plug on 919

Ok, keep in mind I'm not mechanical. Gonna do an oil change on it today and I go to drain the oil and it looked like the plug had some type of liquid goo on it. The last oil change was done at the shop since they were replacing a rear tire and brake pads.

Shouldn't there be a washer, o-ring, or something like that on the drain plug screw?

No leaks or anything prior to the removal of the plug. It's drained but I didn't refill it yet because I need a strap wrench to remove the filter and all I had was the socket type oil filter remover and it no workee with the pipes being so close to the filter. I need to get the strap wrench tomorrow and want to save an extra trip if I need something on that drain plug.

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post #2 of 39 Old 03-10-2014, 09:17 PM
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It sounds like someone used some sealant.. there should be a washer there, most of the plugging is done my the bolt but the washer serves its purpose's. Drain pluga are cheap and mostly universal. I couldn't give you the exact size, though im sure someone can.

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post #3 of 39 Old 03-10-2014, 09:47 PM
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Yeah, it's it suppose to have a copper washer?

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post #4 of 39 Old 03-10-2014, 10:16 PM
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post #5 of 39 Old 03-11-2014, 04:01 AM
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I think the OEM one is an aluminum crush washer. Your local dealer or auto parts stores should have them....just get a 12mm one.

Next oil change, I'm putting one of these in

Qwik Valve

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post #6 of 39 Old 03-11-2014, 08:12 AM
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It was on the outside of the plug? This could just be chain oil.

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post #7 of 39 Old 03-11-2014, 08:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sharkey View Post
Ok, keep in mind I'm not mechanical. Gonna do an oil change on it today and I go to drain the oil and it looked like the plug had some type of liquid goo on it. The last oil change was done at the shop since they were replacing a rear tire and brake pads. Shouldn't there be a washer, o-ring, or something like that on the drain plug screw? No leaks or anything prior to the removal of the plug. It's drained but I didn't refill it yet because I need a strap wrench to remove the filter and all I had was the socket type oil filter remover and it no workee with the pipes being so close to the filter. I need to get the strap wrench tomorrow and want to save an extra trip if I need something on that drain plug.
Also, assuming you're replacing the oil filter, just jab a longish screwdriver through it and use that to loosen it. Every bike I've owned has had the oil filter way over tightened on by the precious owner and I've had to do this to get them off.

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post #8 of 39 Old 03-11-2014, 08:21 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the info. I know my Burgman 650 had a washer on the drain plug. I'll just pick one up today when I get the strap wrench. I forgot about the whole - screw driver thru the filter thing.

The socket filter remover was all I could use on the scooter the way Zuki designed it. I've noticed people tend to overtighten things too.

You'll will be happy to know, it will be filled with Rotella full synthetic.

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post #9 of 39 Old 03-11-2014, 08:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marylandmike View Post
I think the OEM one is an aluminum crush washer. Your local dealer or auto parts stores should have them....just get a 12mm one.

Next oil change, I'm putting one of these in

Qwik Valve
Nice find! Those look quite trick.

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post #10 of 39 Old 03-11-2014, 08:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by g00gl3it View Post
Nice find! Those look quite trick.
Just added one to my Nissan Pathfinder this weekend. Nicely made. I got one for the bike too while I was at it.

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post #11 of 39 Old 03-11-2014, 09:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marylandmike View Post
Just added one to my Nissan Pathfinder this weekend. Nicely made. I got one for the bike too while I was at it.
I've always wanted to get those for my cars but I'd be afraid to put that on my bike, especially where the drain bolt is on the 9'er

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post #12 of 39 Old 03-11-2014, 09:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crimedog View Post
I've always wanted to get those for my cars but I'd be afraid to put that on my bike, especially where the drain bolt is on the 9'er
I have a 900RR exhaust and this plug won't hang down anywhere near as far as the headers, so if I were to hit something, the exhaust would hit first and never had the exhaust scrape before. I'll take a pic after it's installed.

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post #13 of 39 Old 03-11-2014, 10:03 AM
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The problem is a lot of times the people who put oil filters on hand tight have probably been watching copious amounts of porn, so hand tight for them means they could crush the bones in your hand into powder........

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post #14 of 39 Old 03-11-2014, 10:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rpcraft View Post
The problem is a lot of times the people who put oil filters on hand tight have probably been watching copious amounts of porn, so hand tight for them means they could crush the bones in your hand into powder........
That only happens to me if I change my oil while watching porn. I like the jaw style wrench over the strap wrench, much easier to use.


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post #15 of 39 Old 03-11-2014, 11:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marylandmike View Post
I think the OEM one is an aluminum crush washer. Your local dealer or auto parts stores should have them....just get a 12mm one.

Next oil change, I'm putting one of these in

Qwik Valve
No, that would never end up on a bike or car of mine. Thats scary.

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post #16 of 39 Old 03-11-2014, 11:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marylandmike View Post
I think the OEM one is an aluminum crush washer. Your local dealer or auto parts stores should have them....just get a 12mm one.

Next oil change, I'm putting one of these in

Qwik Valve
Nice find. I'd like to see how this looks/works once you have it installed on your bike. My VFR has the oil plug on the side of the oil pan. The first time I changed the oil, I missed the pan and got oil all over the garage floor. I wonder if something like this would make the oil squirt further...



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post #17 of 39 Old 03-11-2014, 12:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NZspokes View Post
No, that would never end up on a bike or car of mine. Thats scary.
But you would use a Nitron shock? All of the MotoGP race teams use these valves.

Quote:
Originally Posted by crakerjac View Post
Nice find. I'd like to see how this looks/works once you have it installed on your bike. My VFR has the oil plug on the side of the oil pan. The first time I changed the oil, I missed the pan and got oil all over the garage floor. I wonder if something like this would make the oil squirt further...
They have another model with a nipple on it that you can connect a piece of tubing to, which may be OK if it's out to the side.

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post #18 of 39 Old 03-11-2014, 12:31 PM
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A ball valve sure looks cool but how hard it is to take out the 17mm socket? The only advantage I see is that it's probably easier to keep your hands clean with the ball valve.

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post #19 of 39 Old 03-11-2014, 02:46 PM
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I can see one advantage is that you eliminate most of the possibility of mis-threading or jacking up the threads on the oil pan.

If you crossthread or snap that bolt, you're looking at a whole new oil pan and another oil change. And you have to drop the headers to drop the oil pan.

Pop this sucker in and you never have to worry about that again (unless you replace it, which should be rare).
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post #20 of 39 Old 03-12-2014, 10:11 AM
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Or you drop the bolt and it rolls into the oil change pan/tub. You then spend the next 10 minutes trying to fish the bolt out of the tiny opening... To me, the drain bolt is the messiest part of the oil change.



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post #21 of 39 Old 03-12-2014, 11:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sharkey View Post
Thanks for the info. I know my Burgman 650 had a washer on the drain plug. I'll just pick one up today when I get the strap wrench. I forgot about the whole - screw driver thru the filter thing.
Save your money on the strap wrench, you should never need it. Use the screwdriver through the filter to get it off this time, and just put the filters on hand tight in the future.

That ball valve looks pretty cool. I'm way too cheap, and oil changes are way too easy on the 919, for me to spend the $25, but I'd probably get one for the car and the truck!

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post #22 of 39 Old 03-12-2014, 11:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by g00gl3it View Post
I can see one advantage is that you eliminate most of the possibility of mis-threading or jacking up the threads on the oil pan. If you crossthread or snap that bolt, you're looking at a whole new oil pan and another oil change. And you have to drop the headers to drop the oil pan. Pop this sucker in and you never have to worry about that again (unless you replace it, which should be rare).
I'm that guy who screwed up the threads in the oil pan. Just for a brief moment when going to loosen the drain bolt, I went righty-tighty instead and it was just enough to damage the aluminum threads in the pan. One of the downsides of steel bolt vs. aluminum pan, I guess. I almost went the route of replacing the pan but was able to get a time sert insert in there and it actually worked. Actually feels like an improvement over the softer threads in the pan.

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post #23 of 39 Old 03-12-2014, 10:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Pete1210 View Post
I'm that guy who screwed up the threads in the oil pan. Just for a brief moment when going to loosen the drain bolt, I went righty-tighty instead and it was just enough to damage the aluminum threads in the pan. One of the downsides of steel bolt vs. aluminum pan, I guess. I almost went the route of replacing the pan but was able to get a time sert insert in there and it actually worked. Actually feels like an improvement over the softer threads in the pan.
Man, you're REALLY trusting that thing.

You realize that if that thing ever let's loose on the road:

A) IF you don't go down instantly due to the coating of the rear wheel in hot oil
then
B) You will burn up your engine in minutes.

Get a new oil pan - they are cheap. Heck, I had an extra one (did I sell it? I can't remember).

I might have one still. If I do, it's yours for the cost of shipping. I'll check tomorrow.

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post #24 of 39 Old 03-12-2014, 11:16 PM
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I tried fitting the Fumoto valve to mine. It doesn't clear that fin on the bottom of the oil pan.

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post #25 of 39 Old 03-13-2014, 07:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CB700S View Post
I tried fitting the Fumoto valve to mine. It doesn't clear that fin on the bottom of the oil pan.
Pictures?



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post #26 of 39 Old 03-13-2014, 08:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by g00gl3it View Post
Man, you're REALLY trusting that thing.

You realize that if that thing ever let's loose on the road:

A) IF you don't go down instantly due to the coating of the rear wheel in hot oil
then
B) You will burn up your engine in minutes.

Get a new oil pan - they are cheap. Heck, I had an extra one (did I sell it? I can't remember).

I might have one still. If I do, it's yours for the cost of shipping. I'll check tomorrow.
If a Time-Sert is properly installed it will never come loose -- period! They are the best way to repair the threads in a damaged hole, and in fact are the only NAS certified thread repair method. Of the hundreds of them I have installed not one has loosened, and in magnesium components they are routinely installed before the part is put into service to insure against thread / part failure. Additionally, if they are damaged while in service they are easily replaced by simply drilling the old one out, chasing the threads to remove the remaining thread helix, and installing another one. Done that quite often too, and it only takes 5 minutes once you know what you are doing.

Helicoils, on the other hand, are absolute crap! If they were my only option I'd replace the part instead.
A full description of a Time-Sert in action: Time-Sert

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post #27 of 39 Old 03-13-2014, 08:53 AM
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Thanks Rob, I do remember reading up on the difference between Time-Serts and Helicoils and I was probably thinking of Helicoils in my response.

Good to know the durability and safety of Time-Serts has been proven, thanks for the info!

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post #28 of 39 Old 03-13-2014, 09:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CB700S View Post
I tried fitting the Fumoto valve to mine. It doesn't clear that fin on the bottom of the oil pan.
Your'e right, that tab is in the way. It's the one that most people break of when the wrench slips. It looks like I can Helimech (Dremel) about 1/4 off the bottom of the tab and it will clear. Still a couple of thousand miles from my next oil change to install it.

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post #29 of 39 Old 03-13-2014, 01:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robtharalson View Post
If a Time-Sert is properly installed it will never come loose -- period! They are the best way to repair the threads in a damaged hole, and in fact are the only NAS certified thread repair method. Of the hundreds of them I have installed not one has loosened, and in magnesium components they are routinely installed before the part is put into service to insure against thread / part failure. Additionally, if they are damaged while in service they are easily replaced by simply drilling the old one out, chasing the threads to remove the remaining thread helix, and installing another one. Done that quite often too, and it only takes 5 minutes once you know what you are doing. Helicoils, on the other hand, are absolute crap! If they were my only option I'd replace the part instead. A full description of a Time-Sert in action: Time-Sert Rob
I did a lot of research prior to making the repair vs. replacing the pan. Everything seemed to point to the time sert being more than acceptable. After seeing the insert and completing the repair (with loctite) I'm pretty pleased with the job. I actually feel pretty good about the security of the bolt. You can see the reviews on the heli coil and there was no way I'd use that on an oil pan. Thanks to all for feedback.

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post #30 of 39 Old 03-13-2014, 06:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robtharalson View Post
..........Helicoils, on the other hand, are absolute crap! If they were my only option I'd replace the part instead.
A full description of a Time-Sert in action: Time-Sert

Rob
Rob, I absolutely agree with you on the Time-Sert but need to take exception on the Helicoil.

We use Helicoil's in the aerospace industry regularly. The type I see most are the locking type. The threads themselves are much stronger than the aluminum the component is usually made of.
I also have installed countless helicoils in a particle accelerator ring made of soft aluminum that I helped assemble in Berkely CA. Thread forming was first tried but these holes needed to be drilled out to accept helicoils.
There's a specific recipe to follow for hole diameter, depth of thread, etc., that will result in a tough, re-usable threaded hole.

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post #31 of 39 Old 06-11-2014, 05:41 PM
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Installed the Qwik Valve tonight when I did an oil change. I did have to trim about 1/4" off on that tab (fin) that hangs down next to the drain plug. Plenty of ground clearance. The exhaust headers hang way below it.
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File Type: jpg QwikValve.JPG (37.0 KB, 187 views)
File Type: jpg QwikValve1.JPG (22.7 KB, 48 views)

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post #32 of 39 Old 07-23-2014, 10:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marylandmike View Post
Installed the Qwik Valve tonight when I did an oil change. I did have to trim about 1/4" off on that tab (fin) that hangs down next to the drain plug. Plenty of ground clearance. The exhaust headers hang way below it.
Nice. Where'd you get that Mike?

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post #33 of 39 Old 07-23-2014, 12:12 PM
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Nice. Where'd you get that Mike?
See post #5 for a link

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post #34 of 39 Old 07-23-2014, 12:25 PM
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Would help if I opened my freakin' eyes....lol


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post #35 of 39 Old 03-13-2015, 12:59 PM
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Resurrecting this thread: Mike, did you get it with the nipple to attach the hose?

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post #36 of 39 Old 03-13-2015, 03:08 PM
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Quote:
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Resurrecting this thread: Mike, did you get it with the nipple to attach the hose?
Nope. I got the one without it. The oil just drains straight down, so I just stick a pan right under it.

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post #37 of 39 Old 07-31-2020, 10:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marylandmike View Post
Nope. I got the one without it. The oil just drains straight down, so I just stick a pan right under it.
Sorry for the thread bump, but what washers did you use, and did you use a loctite or other thread retaining compound on the quick valve? I have a Fumoto valve on my CB500x, but it sticks out the back instead of straight down. It might have required an adaptor now that I think about it. This one seems to be a lot lower profile.

And it's definitely an F109 12mm x 1.5? The CB900F isn't popping up on their fit finder.

Edit, I found a "2007 HONDA (OTHERS) CB900 0.92L 4 cyl" in the "Honda (others)" category, but it's recommending an F106, which is 14 mm x 1.5. UUUGGGHHHHH!!!

Thanks!

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post #38 of 39 Old 08-05-2020, 05:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darth_Firebolt View Post
Sorry for the thread bump, but what washers did you use, and did you use a loctite or other thread retaining compound on the quick valve? I have a Fumoto valve on my CB500x, but it sticks out the back instead of straight down. It might have required an adaptor now that I think about it. This one seems to be a lot lower profile.

And it's definitely an F109 12mm x 1.5? The CB900F isn't popping up on their fit finder.

Edit, I found a "2007 HONDA (OTHERS) CB900 0.92L 4 cyl" in the "Honda (others)" category, but it's recommending an F106, which is 14 mm x 1.5. UUUGGGHHHHH!!!

Thanks!
Sorry Darth, just saw this. I did not use any loctite on the quick valve, and I used the washer that was supplied with it. I suppose a little blue loctite wouldn't hurt for a little peace of mind.

It's been a long time. I know that the drain plug is 12mm and pretty sure it's 1.5. I think a really common size for drain plugs is 12mmX1.25. The 1.5's are hard to find. I took the OEM plug to the auto parts store that had one of the thread sizer boards.

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post #39 of 39 Old 08-06-2020, 12:15 PM
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Originally Posted by marylandmike View Post
Sorry Darth, just saw this. I did not use any loctite on the quick valve, and I used the washer that was supplied with it. I suppose a little blue loctite wouldn't hurt for a little peace of mind.

It's been a long time. I know that the drain plug is 12mm and pretty sure it's 1.5. I think a really common size for drain plugs is 12mmX1.25. The 1.5's are hard to find. I took the OEM plug to the auto parts store that had one of the thread sizer boards.
Thanks. I knew the 14mm was wrong because the service manual claims it's 12mm, but doesn't list the pitch.

The picture of yours says it's an F109, and Fumoto claims that to be a 12mm x 1.5, so I'm just going to order it.
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2007 919, 2013 CB500X, 2009 Buell XB12R, 20+ bicycles
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