New Chain Every 15k? - Wrist Twisters
 
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post #1 of 18 Old 09-21-2008, 04:55 AM Thread Starter
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New Chain Every 15k?

So after my last service I'm being told that I have to buy a new chain. My bike has 15k miles on it. Should your chain need to be replaced every 15k?

Could someone suggest a chain I could buy that might get me some more before needing to be replaced?

2005 Honda 919
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post #2 of 18 Old 09-21-2008, 06:06 AM
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Trick???, but seams early.

If you keep it clean/ lubed/adjusted it should last much longer.Also Harder riding will eat a chain faster(like tires but not as much)

As for brand I've got no favorite

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post #3 of 18 Old 09-21-2008, 06:08 AM
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There is a chain maintenance link in the 919 Helpful Topics which will answer your 2nd question. Chain life will vary depending on how well it is cared. Wheelies will shorten the life considerably.

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post #4 of 18 Old 09-21-2008, 06:09 AM
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Best place to check for wear is on the back of the rear sproket, new you cann't lift it much if at all as it wears you can lift it off the sprocket.

Hopefully someone here has picts or can exp this better.

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post #5 of 18 Old 09-21-2008, 06:21 AM
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I've had to replace chains in less than 15k.

I'm not much into bling, but a gold chain on a 919 really looks good.

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post #6 of 18 Old 09-21-2008, 06:56 AM Thread Starter
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No wheelies, and I lube it weekly (more then every 500 miles), but I do ride it pretty hard.

2005 Honda 919
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post #7 of 18 Old 09-21-2008, 08:06 AM Thread Starter
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I found this:
D.I.D. 530ZVM2 Series Heavy Duty X'ring Chain but the # of links I need is a little confusing. I think 114 is the standard, but another mentioned 112 might be better, and another suggested I could even go 110. I'm not capable of doing any later adjusting or changing sprockets or anything so should I just get the 114 or is the 112 going to be ok? Oh and would anyone suggest another chain over this one?

2005 Honda 919
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post #8 of 18 Old 09-21-2008, 09:17 AM
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I have a 15/45t setup with 112 links...would I have to add a link if I wanted to swap the 15 for a 17?

Michael Reyes

2002 Honda 919 / 2009 Honda Civic Si Sedan
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post #9 of 18 Old 09-21-2008, 09:46 AM
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Vastlee, I am running stock gearing with 112 links on a real nice DID 530 chain. You should try it too!

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post #10 of 18 Old 09-21-2008, 09:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vastlee View Post
I found this:
D.I.D. 530ZVM2 Series Heavy Duty X'ring Chain but the # of links I need is a little confusing. I think 114 is the standard, but another mentioned 112 might be better, and another suggested I could even go 110. I'm not capable of doing any later adjusting or changing sprockets or anything so should I just get the 114 or is the 112 going to be ok? Oh and would anyone suggest another chain over this one?
Go with 114 links. 112 links doesn't fit on ALL 919's.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mikochu View Post
I have a 15/45t setup with 112 links...would I have to add a link if I wanted to swap the 15 for a 17?
Yes.

Professional
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post #11 of 18 Old 09-21-2008, 09:56 AM Thread Starter
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114 would give me less room to adjust wouldn't it? And another question, how much mechanical experience do I need to be able to put this on myself? I'd much rather do that then to pay someone 75 bucks to do it, but in the same sense I don't want to screw it up just to save 75 bucks.

2005 Honda 919
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post #12 of 18 Old 09-21-2008, 10:02 AM
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You might want to look into a 520 chain as well, but you'll have to buy new sprockets as well then (I would recommend it anyways with a new chain). I'm running the top one on this list:
http://www.rkexcelamerica.com/rk_cha...25_530gxw.html
And it's awesome, plus the gold does add some bling (not real big on bling here either, but it looks good). Oh yeah, X-Ring over O-Ring too.

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post #13 of 18 Old 09-21-2008, 10:21 AM
 
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I came across an interesting suggestion on chain maintenance on the "chain gang" message board (bmw f 650 board). Those guys are using ATF (automatic transmission fluid) on their chains. It is claimed that they can get 50,000 miles on a set of gears and chains. It turns out that ATF is very, very slippery and actually cleans the chain HOWEVER it is only good for one tank of gas. And it makes a heck of-a mess outta the rear end of the bike. I've adopted the use of ATF and use it to clean the chain and than go back to my trusted 90 weight gear oil after a couple tanks of gas. ATF restored and cleaned even on the rusted chain on my f 650gs Dakar (gone to a new home) and has kept wear to a minimum on the 919 which replaced it. I stay away from the aerosol spray the help lubricant "cling" to the chain as they also help grit "cling" to the chain promoting wear. My only concern is that the chain and sprockets are lastin too long and I'd really like to change the sprockets to enhance the acceleration of the 919.

Be safe!

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post #14 of 18 Old 09-21-2008, 10:23 AM
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114 might give you less rearward adjustment, but 112 might not fit at all. I'll explain. Some 919's can run 112 links with no problems and on others, it's simply to short to fit. 112 links would not fit on my 06' until I modified the chain adjusters. On some 919's with 114links, they run out of adjustment quick. On these models, 112 links seems to fit with no problem. Honda must be welding up swingarms in two different jigs or something, because the year of the bike or whether it's a California model or 49 state model doesn't seem to matter. Go with 114 to be safe. If you don't have the proper skills and a good chain press, it will be cheaper to pay $75.00. Keep it properly adjusted and lubed (motorcycle specific lube only, no matter what anybody else tells you!). 15K from the stock chain is pretty good. You might want to replace your sprockets if the show considerable wear, as worn sprockets will wear-out a new chain in short order. STAY AWAY FROM ALUMINUM REAR SPROCKETS!!!!!
If you want durability, stick with the stock 530 chain size.
ATF is great for cleaning a chain and it is pretty slippery, but I wouldn't use it as a primary lube because of it's "fling factor" and the fact that it could get all over your rear brake rotor. It would probably work better in an autolube / oiler system that meters it out sparingly. Best of luck.

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post #15 of 18 Old 09-21-2008, 06:10 PM
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If a chain only lasts 15,000 miles there is a basic problem, probably with maintenance. It certainly sounds like it's not getting the kind of TLC required for longer life, which either means really picky cleaning and lubrication every couple of hundred miles or my solution -- a Scottoiler automatic oiler. They are a bit pricey, but given that I have over 30,000 miles on my present chain and sprockets and have only had to do one minor adjustment in that time I'd say it has already paid for itself at least once, and will continue to do so for a considerable time to come.

Basically, I'm a lazy person and if I can fill the oiler once a week and ignore everything regardless of how much I ride so much the better. Add to this the quart of 10W-40 oil I buy at a 99 cent store will last at least 10,000 miles, making a total cost per mile of 0.0105 cents, and if I run out in the middle of nowhere any gas station has motor oil while chain lube is considerably more difficult to find, I'd say there isn't much of a downside to using it.

Anyway, it's worth considering. Look up the Scottoiler at http://www.scottoiler.com/
Or a considerably less expensive alternative semi automatic oiler, the Loobman, at http://www.chainoiler.co.uk/
Either will do the job nicely, but the Scottoiler requires less attention on my part.
Lazy, remember?

Rob

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post #16 of 18 Old 09-25-2008, 10:42 PM
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20,000 on mine with ole Loobman and 90wt. Still snug on the rear sprocket. It don't take long to figure out how often to give her a squeeze, to keep it wet with out making it sloppy.

[
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post #17 of 18 Old 09-25-2008, 10:53 PM
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My Loobman oiler head made of plastic, zip ties, and a wire, came loose and got ate up in the rear sprocket. I took a piece of 6061 and milled a replica with 3/16" brass oil tubes. I then pop riveted it in place and we all lived happily ever after. 4oz of oil last about 5000-6000 miles.

[
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post #18 of 18 Old 09-26-2008, 05:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robtharalson View Post
If a chain only lasts 15,000 miles there is a basic problem, probably with maintenance. It certainly sounds like it's not getting the kind of TLC required for longer life, which either means really picky cleaning and lubrication every couple of hundred miles or my solution -- a Scottoiler automatic oiler. They are a bit pricey, but given that I have over 30,000 miles on my present chain and sprockets and have only had to do one minor adjustment in that time I'd say it has already paid for itself at least once, and will continue to do so for a considerable time to come.

Basically, I'm a lazy person and if I can fill the oiler once a week and ignore everything regardless of how much I ride so much the better. Add to this the quart of 10W-40 oil I buy at a 99 cent store will last at least 10,000 miles, making a total cost per mile of 0.0105 cents, and if I run out in the middle of nowhere any gas station has motor oil while chain lube is considerably more difficult to find, I'd say there isn't much of a downside to using it.

Anyway, it's worth considering. Look up the Scottoiler at http://www.scottoiler.com/
Or a considerably less expensive alternative semi automatic oiler, the Loobman, at http://www.chainoiler.co.uk/
Either will do the job nicely, but the Scottoiler requires less attention on my part.
Lazy, remember?

Rob


How much mess does the scott oiler make on rim, swingarm, engine, etc.. ?

You say your lazy but you might love to wash the bike...

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