Front fork and tree removal ?'s - Wrist Twisters
 
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post #1 of 4 Old 10-09-2008, 12:48 PM Thread Starter
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Front fork and tree removal ?'s

I'm gunna be hitting the power coat shop during the winter and need to disassemble my fork lowers and my triple tree clamps.

I've never broken forks all the way down and I'm a little apprehensive about dust seals and whatnot. Is there an easy way to get the lowers apart without breaking the forks totally down? Obviously they need to come apart to some extent. Do I need new seals or other parts on the reinstall?

Same with the triple tree brackets. The service manual says it's required to have some job specific tools. Steering stem socket and a couple others are mentioned. Are bearings a real big deal? Re-grease upon install? IDK

Also, the stock rearsets and swingarm pivot are going too. Those look pretty straight forward but If there's a heads up I'd like to hear it.


I'm slightly intimidated but hell bent. Help is much appreciated.

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post #2 of 4 Old 10-09-2008, 12:57 PM
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post #3 of 4 Old 10-09-2008, 01:17 PM
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The rear of the bike is simple like you said. No problems there.

I'd suggest printing out the fork assembly-specific manual pages that is listed in a couple other threads. They will help tremendously. As will the multitude of smart folks here to consult if you get in over your head. And, yes, you will have to break them down completely. Go ahead and order the dust seals and other replacement parts. The powder coater will be baking the fork tubes, so they need to be devoid of all rubber bits. I cannot stress this next statement enough, so please read it carefully--make sure you tell the powder coater to not get any paint residue whatsoever inside the fork tube, especially where the seals seat (say that fast three times!). When you get the tubes done, do not leave his/her shop until you visually inspect the inside of each tube. If there is residue on the inside, I would not leave until it is completely gone. Don't ask me how I know this... )

Here's a couple of things I did when I took mine apart for coating (I did not tackle the forks myself, but the tips will still apply):

1. Have a digital camera handy. Take pics of before/during/after breaking parts down. Nothing like a real live shot of your actual work to help you remember how to put her back together.
2. Buy a box of ziplock-style sandwich bags. Tag all small parts with labels of your choosing (I used small, blank address labels), then place them in the bags. You can't put too much info on the tags--what side, what position, which hole, etc...

Good luck!!!

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post #4 of 4 Old 10-09-2008, 08:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brevity View Post
The rear of the bike is simple like you said. No problems there.

I'd suggest printing out the fork assembly-specific manual pages that is listed in a couple other threads. They will help tremendously. As will the multitude of smart folks here to consult if you get in over your head. And, yes, you will have to break them down completely. Go ahead and order the dust seals and other replacement parts. The powder coater will be baking the fork tubes, so they need to be devoid of all rubber bits. I cannot stress this next statement enough, so please read it carefully--make sure you tell the powder coater to not get any paint residue whatsoever inside the fork tube, especially where the seals seat (say that fast three times!). When you get the tubes done, do not leave his/her shop until you visually inspect the inside of each tube. If there is residue on the inside, I would not leave until it is completely gone. Don't ask me how I know this... )

Here's a couple of things I did when I took mine apart for coating (I did not tackle the forks myself, but the tips will still apply):

1. Have a digital camera handy. Take pics of before/during/after breaking parts down. Nothing like a real live shot of your actual work to help you remember how to put her back together.
2. Buy a box of ziplock-style sandwich bags. Tag all small parts with labels of your choosing (I used small, blank address labels), then place them in the bags. You can't put too much info on the tags--what side, what position, which hole, etc...

Good luck!!!
Great tips, I might try to tackle something more difficult over the winter just to say I used that great advice...

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