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post #1 of 78 Old 06-12-2018, 10:03 AM Thread Starter
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fork springs

Hi fellow 9ers. long time lurker first time poster here.

To be honest I'm not all that comfortable on my bike. When I bought my '03 919 used I assumed I would get a better feel for it, like I did with the speed triple 955 I had a few years back, but I'm just not coming around. Anyway, I am looking for a guide here to help me make the bike more suitable for me.

I started looking at the throttle tamer and I do think it may help to a degree, however after reading up some of the posts here I think I would be better off working on the fork springs(may still do the throttle tamer eventually).

I'm not a small guy, 6' 230ish pounds, so I was looking at .9 or .95 springs and maybe some preload adjusters I found on Ebay. I have also read that replacing the fork oil alone can make a big difference.

So can I just support the bike pull the caps off the forks, remove old springs, suck out the oil and replace the oil and springs and put it all back together? or is there more to it? will I need more parts?

thanks, quadiak

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post #2 of 78 Old 06-12-2018, 01:49 PM
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it's pretty easy to work on the forks. You do have to remove them to get all the fork gunk out though. Really not that big of a deal though, just get the front of the bike off the ground and drop the tubes out, literally only 2 bolts each side. there's plenty of videos out there, and i believe theres even a few fleshed out posts from here that discuss what you're talking about.

what exactly is it that makes you uncomfortable on the bike?

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post #3 of 78 Old 06-12-2018, 05:46 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by nathanktm View Post
it's pretty easy to work on the forks. You do have to remove them to get all the fork gunk out though. Really not that big of a deal though, just get the front of the bike off the ground and drop the tubes out, literally only 2 bolts each side. there's plenty of videos out there, and i believe theres even a few fleshed out posts from here that discuss what you're talking about.

what exactly is it that makes you uncomfortable on the bike?
Thanks, I was kinda of wondering about gunk in the bottom that a fluid extractor might not be able to suck up.

As far as what part of the 919 makes me uncomfortable, I wish I could easily pinpoint it so I could get this right the first time.

I believe it to be mostly a stability issue compared to other bikes I have owned, but once again I am unsure. it brakes great, accelerates nicely, but corners just don't feel quite right.

An example is that I find myself slowing down to much in corners, instead of easing on the throttle and smoothly accelerating, I am going all the way down to first and easing my way around the corner. Not sure if it's the front end lurch I am anticipating or the slightly twitchy throttle messing me up or a tire issue(pr3 in front, pp3 in back). I suppose it could be that the bike doesnt have as much torque at lower rpm than I was used to, but I really don't think that's it. because it still has plenty of torque. a fourth option might simply be that I have turned chicken in my old age 😉

Either way I'm sure with the right setup I would really enjoy this bike.

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post #4 of 78 Old 06-12-2018, 06:57 PM
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I had a problem with my 06 when I got it and was concerned about tearing into it as it is my daily driver.

The forks were a big problem and I found out exactly the cause. The seals allowed water to get into the forks and the fluid was slush.

The fluid needs to be changed from time to time anyways.

I used a floor jack and a rear stand to hold the bike. You can also lift other ways, but a floor jack under the exhaust does the trick.

I use brake cleaner to clean things out and replace the seals. Set them upside down and let them drain, spray some brake cleaner in there and let it drain out.

Just make sure they are fully clean before you add the fresh oil.


IDK about the springs, but before I'd do anything, I'd check the condition and adjustments of what you have now. For < $80 you should be able to replace the seals and fork oil. Then see how things feel.

Once you dig into the system, you'll feel more at ease with it. Breaking down the forks every year for some fresh oil, isn't a bad idea.

How old is the tire, has it cupped yet? What kind of adjustment have you made to the forks? How old is the oil?

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post #5 of 78 Old 06-12-2018, 07:27 PM Thread Starter
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I had a problem with my 06 when I got it and was concerned about tearing into it as it is my daily driver.

The forks were a big problem and I found out exactly the cause. The seals allowed water to get into the forks and the fluid was slush.

The fluid needs to be changed from time to time anyways.

I used a floor jack and a rear stand to hold the bike. You can also lift other ways, but a floor jack under the exhaust does the trick.

I use brake cleaner to clean things out and replace the seals. Set them upside down and let them drain, spray some brake cleaner in there and let it drain out.

Just make sure they are fully clean before you add the fresh oil.


IDK about the springs, but before I'd do anything, I'd check the condition and adjustments of what you have now. For < $80 you should be able to replace the seals and fork oil. Then see how things feel.

Once you dig into the system, you'll feel more at ease with it. Breaking down the forks every year for some fresh oil, isn't a bad idea.

How old is the tire, has it cupped yet? What kind of adjustment have you made to the forks? How old is the oil?
Thanks for the tip on water entering the forks.

The front tire is in great shape, no cupping at all yet. rear tire however is showing some wear. I haven't done anything yet to the forks as I don't believe the 2003 has any available adjustment and I have yet to take them apart. Oil could be original for all I know

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post #6 of 78 Old 06-12-2018, 09:48 PM
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Tires can make a world of a difference. Also, correctly setting sag does a lot as well. If you intend on keeping the bike, I do believe that springs are a good idea, as with your weight in mind I think the stock forks might not be able to reach the desired sag. I would also make sure the head bearings are not binding up and that there's no resistance when steering the bike.

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post #7 of 78 Old 06-13-2018, 02:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadiak View Post
Thanks for the tip on water entering the forks.

The front tire is in great shape, no cupping at all yet. rear tire however is showing some wear. I haven't done anything yet to the forks as I don't believe the 2003 has any available adjustment and I have yet to take them apart. Oil could be original for all I know
I was under the impression that the 03 version had some adjustment, just not as much as the 04+.

Either way, I'd check the age of the tire (> 3 years might be too much).

I see the Progressive are about $90, someone said that a fixed rate was better than progressive, but IDK.

The cost you save by doing the seals yourself could cover the cost of the springs.

One other note while you're in there, they make those valves:

https://www.sportbiketrackgear.com/r...lve-fork-kits/

IDK how much they help, but I'm sure we have some people around here that know.

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post #8 of 78 Old 06-13-2018, 11:27 AM Thread Starter
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how much difference would these make

https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?m...2F263358262742

using stock springs and fresh 10 wt synthetic oil?

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post #9 of 78 Old 06-13-2018, 11:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadiak View Post
how much difference would these make

https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?m...2F263358262742

just using stick springs and fresh 10 wt synthetic oil?
For all intents and purposes, zero difference in this case.
The stock springs are mush by being insanely soft.
Mush is mush, more preload has no effect on spring rate.

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post #10 of 78 Old 06-13-2018, 04:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadiak View Post
how much difference would these make

https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?m...2F263358262742

using stock springs and fresh 10 wt synthetic oil?
Combined with correct weight springs those preload adjusters may allow you to set the correct sag.
Better still would be to find some second hand 04 forks. Or buy 04 internals and convert your forks. There's a thread around here on that subject. I converted my 02 forks with a set of crappy second hand 04 forks. Just swapped the guts out.
A pc111usb will help greatly with the twitchy thottle. Smooths things out, no more on/off feel. Starter valve synchronization may help any low end surging also, if it's off.
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post #11 of 78 Old 06-13-2018, 06:58 PM Thread Starter
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I went ahead and ordered some .95 racetech springs. I think I will start by cleaning out the forks and installing the new springs with 10 wt oil set to 140 mm. hopefully that is enough.


Quote:
Originally Posted by nathanktm View Post
Tires can make a world of a difference. Also, correctly setting sag does a lot as well. If you intend on keeping the bike, I do believe that springs are a good idea, as with your weight in mind I think the stock forks might not be able to reach the desired sag. I would also make sure the head bearings are not binding up and that there's no resistance when steering the bike.
head bearings feel fine.

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post #12 of 78 Old 06-14-2018, 09:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Quadiak View Post
I went ahead and ordered some .95 racetech springs. I think I will start by cleaning out the forks and installing the new springs with 10 wt oil set to 140 mm. hopefully that is enough.




head bearings feel fine.
Suggested is no more oil level than 140 mm on the basis of your 0.95 kg/mm spring set.
I'd also suggest 10 mm to an absolute max of 15 mm of installed preload, again on the basis of your spring rate choice.
Suggest you start with 10 mm.
Follow the Racetech instructions re figuring out the required spacer length to give you the target installed preload.
Ignore any suggestion to instead base it on RT spring L + new Spacer L = stock spring L + stock spacer L.

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post #13 of 78 Old 06-14-2018, 11:40 AM
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If it's a "feel" thing that's troubling you, I would second the suggestions that you include the front tyre in all of this. If it's old or over-inflated, it can change cornering quite dramatically. I had a Pirelli front for a while that felt like a block of wood if pressure went beyond about 31psi. And the Michelin front that was on it [orig, maybe? 7 yrs old?] when I bought the bike just felt terrible.

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post #14 of 78 Old 06-14-2018, 11:50 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadiak View Post
I went ahead and ordered some .95 racetech springs. I think I will start by cleaning out the forks and installing the new springs with 10 wt oil set to 140 mm. hopefully that is enough.



head bearings feel fine.
Suggested is no more oil level than 140 mm on the basis of your 0.95 kg/mm spring set.
I'd also suggest 10 mm to an absolute max of 15 mm of installed preload, again on the basis of your spring rate choice.
Suggest you start with 10 mm.
Follow the Racetech instructions re figuring out the required spacer length to give you the target installed preload.
Ignore any suggestion to instead base it on RT spring L + new Spacer L = stock spring L + stock spacer L.
thanks for the tips.

really looking forward to this mod now &#x1f642;

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post #15 of 78 Old 06-14-2018, 11:57 AM Thread Starter
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If it's a "feel" thing that's troubling you, I would second the suggestions that you include the front tyre in all of this. If it's old or over-inflated, it can change cornering quite dramatically. I had a Pirelli front for a while that felt like a block of wood if pressure went beyond about 31psi. And the Michelin front that was on it [orig, maybe? 7 yrs old?] when I bought the bike just felt terrible.
I let the tire pressures down to 32 front and 35 rear just this morning. will see how that goes.

also the tire is marked 1614 so approx 4 years old. and still like new. would be hard to justify replacing it.

that being said I am a bit unsure about the tire design itself. since I don't ride in wet conditions, basically ever. I wonder if the pr3 is the right tire to have on my bike?

I did also really like the bridgestones that came on my speed triple years ago. it literally felt glued to the pavement.

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post #16 of 78 Old 06-14-2018, 02:03 PM
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I let the tire pressures down to 32 front and 35 rear just this morning. will see how that goes.

also the tire is marked 1614 so approx 4 years old. and still like new. would be hard to justify replacing it.

that being said I am a bit unsure about the tire design itself. since I don't ride in wet conditions, basically ever. I wonder if the pr3 is the right tire to have on my bike?

I did also really like the bridgestones that came on my speed triple years ago. it literally felt glued to the pavement.
Front pr3 =Pilot Road 3 or something else ?
Rear pp3 =Pilot Power 3 or something else ?

IF so, an extremely odd mix, plus being the reverse of what I'd anticipate such a combination being set up as.
Also, what are the present tire sizes?

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post #17 of 78 Old 06-14-2018, 02:11 PM Thread Starter
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I let the tire pressures down to 32 front and 35 rear just this morning. will see how that goes.

also the tire is marked 1614 so approx 4 years old. and still like new. would be hard to justify replacing it.

that being said I am a bit unsure about the tire design itself. since I don't ride in wet conditions, basically ever. I wonder if the pr3 is the right tire to have on my bike?

I did also really like the bridgestones that came on my speed triple years ago. it literally felt glued to the pavement.
Front pr3 =Pilot Road 3 or something else ?
Rear pp3 =Pilot Power 3 or something else ?

IF so, an extremely odd mix, plus being the reverse of what I'd anticipate such a combination being set up as.
Also, what are the present tire sizes?
correct on the road 3 and power 3 tire types.

they are stock sizes I believe. 120/70zr17 front and 180/55zr17 rear

this is what the front tire looks like currently.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 15290105424814002287796333260535_1529010566346.jpg (129.4 KB, 7 views)

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post #18 of 78 Old 06-14-2018, 04:31 PM
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correct on the road 3 and power 3 tire types.

they are stock sizes I believe. 120/70zr17 front and 180/55zr17 rear

this is what the front tire looks like currently.
1
I would be asking LDH to opine on this combination.

2
My understanding is that the PR3 is a touring oriented tire with excellent low temp wet grip.
As such, in addition it will have profile and carcass design consistent with non serious sport use.

The PP3 on the other hand, is a serious sports oriented tire, suitable for track days.
As such, in addition it will have profile and carcass design consistent for such intended use.
Said profile and carcass design will not be the same as the PR3.
Obviously the tread compound and tread pattern are different.

Very odd to me is putting a tour-ie tire on the front and a sporty on the back.
If anything, the order should be reversed. ("softer" front re cooler running fronts to balance out a "harder" rear running stickier because of greater rear tire heat)
Anyway, if the tires are in good shape, of the correct size, and you're running pressures of this world, as in the 32/35 you mentioned, then my guess, and I must stress the word guess, is that for normal road riding there is no dangerous mismatch.
My guess is that you might "feel" something from the mix, but that's about it.
Don't repeat it though, when it comes time to change tires.
Keep the front and rear common, aside from size!

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post #19 of 78 Old 06-14-2018, 05:51 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by mcromo44 View Post

1
I would be asking LDH to opine on this combination.

2
My understanding is that the PR3 is a touring oriented tire with excellent low temp wet grip.
As such, in addition it will have profile and carcass design consistent with non serious sport use.

The PP3 on the other hand, is a serious sports oriented tire, suitable for track days.
As such, in addition it will have profile and carcass design consistent for such intended use.
Said profile and carcass design will not be the same as the PR3.
Obviously the tread compound and tread pattern are different.

Very odd to me is putting a tour-ie tire on the front and a sporty on the back.
If anything, the order should be reversed. ("softer" front re cooler running fronts to balance out a "harder" rear running stickier because of greater rear tire heat)
Anyway, if the tires are in good shape, of the correct size, and you're running pressures of this world, as in the 32/35 you mentioned, then my guess, and I must stress the word guess, is that for normal road riding there is no dangerous mismatch.
My guess is that you might "feel" something from the mix, but that's about it.
Don't repeat it though, when it comes time to change tires.
Keep the front and rear common, aside from size!
That all makes perfect sense to me. Right along the lines which I was thinking, however I was completely unsure if I was even close to correct.

I am very much a fair weather rider, who mostly enjoys riding twisty back roads on nice sunny days. That said, I am currently using my 919 for a 50 mile(one way) commute to and from work when the weather is right. That commute will be ending this August(about the same time as my rear tire will need replacing), so I might consider replacing both tires at that time, if a better set up will give me more of that "feel" I am looking for.

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post #20 of 78 Old 06-14-2018, 06:01 PM
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I can help as i just did this (1kg spring, 10w oil, i believe 150 oil and 10mm preload). First, check your rear tire. If its flattened or squared like mine was the bike wont want to lean. Second, drop your forks 10mm from flush (in other words, 10mm of fork showing on the top of the tube). This made a huge difference in terms of handling, more so than the springs themselves. Check your rear shock, is it on position 5? The handling on the bike will never be that of a sport tourer or SS but you can paint a pig a little prettier.

I'm 6'4, 220lb


use @mcromo44, guy is a fantastic wealth of information

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post #21 of 78 Old 06-14-2018, 06:12 PM
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Swap the rear to a PR3 now while the front is still good. You have the tires fighting you and each other, the PR3's like to roll through anything, the PP3 wants to throw you down.
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post #22 of 78 Old 06-14-2018, 06:37 PM
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I can help as i just did this (1kg spring, 10w oil, i believe 150 oil and 10mm preload). First, check your rear tire. If its flattened or squared like mine was the bike wont want to lean. Second, drop your forks 10mm from flush (in other words, 10mm of fork showing on the top of the tube). This made a huge difference in terms of handling, more so than the springs themselves. Check your rear shock, is it on position 5? The handling on the bike will never be that of a sport tourer or SS but you can paint a pig a little prettier.

I'm 6'4, 220lb

Not so fast.

You have a post 03 with the attendant mush rear spring on the same shock eye to eye length, so your rear will sit lower, hence raising the tubes a bit in the forks will speed up the front end a bit by giving it a bit more "quickening"geometry (less "road" steering head angle and "trail").

Meanwhile, he has an earlier model with the stiffer rear spring and resultant taller rear ride height.
Raising his tubes would be a bad move in my mind.
Leaving the tubes in the stock position in association with the stiffer rear spring, provides for a slightly higher C of G, which means less effort is needed to lever the bike over from vertical as part of turn initiation or adjustment, while also maximizing the "Trail" which provides for maximized front end "Feel".
Meanwhile, raising the tubes in the clamps lowers the C of G thus requiring more effort for getting the bike off vertical, plus reduces the Trail and hence also Feel.

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post #23 of 78 Old 06-14-2018, 09:30 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by n4cr View Post
I can help as i just did this (1kg spring, 10w oil, i believe 150 oil and 10mm preload). First, check your rear tire. If its flattened or squared like mine was the bike wont want to lean. Second, drop your forks 10mm from flush (in other words, 10mm of fork showing on the top of the tube). This made a huge difference in terms of handling, more so than the springs themselves. Check your rear shock, is it on position 5? The handling on the bike will never be that of a sport tourer or SS but you can paint a pig a little prettier.

I'm 6'4, 220lb

Not so fast.

You have a post 03 with the attendant mush rear spring on the same shock eye to eye length, so your rear will sit lower, hence raising the tubes a bit in the forks will speed up the front end a bit by giving it a bit more "quickening"geometry (less "road" steering head angle and "trail").

Meanwhile, he has an earlier model with the stiffer rear spring and resultant taller rear ride height.
Raising his tubes would be a bad move in my mind.
Leaving the tubes in the stock position in association with the stiffer rear spring, provides for a slightly higher C of G, which means less effort is needed to lever the bike over from vertical as part of turn initiation or adjustment, while also maximizing the "Trail" which provides for maximized front end "Feel".
Meanwhile, raising the tubes in the clamps lowers the C of G thus requiring more effort for getting the bike off vertical, plus reduces the Trail and hence also Feel.
so you're saying to try the springs first, then maybe drop the fork tubes 10mm? or not to drop the fork tubes at all?

btw my rear shock is currently set at 5. is that to tight for an 03?

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post #24 of 78 Old 06-15-2018, 07:23 AM
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so you're saying to try the springs first, then maybe drop the fork tubes 10mm? or not to drop the fork tubes at all?

btw my rear shock is currently set at 5. is that to tight for an 03?
I suggest you try the springs first and leave the tubes alone.

After your first ride, I suggest you try dropping the rear back to # 2.
Then try #3.
See how it feels.
Keep in mind that part of what you will sense will include the lower tire pressure you are already using (correct? now @ 35?)
At #5 you have what is essentially a solid rear end when you are nearing top out, such as you get during from fork dive from heavy braking.
Once you have the rear where you want it, then try raising the tubes if you want to.
5 mm at a time.
Personally, it's not my approach, I go for tall ride heights for easier leverage and maximum trail, all this came from track days.
But you may like the feel of raised tubes for the riding you are doing.
It's an easy experiment to change back from.

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post #25 of 78 Old 06-20-2018, 06:28 PM Thread Starter
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As I wait for my fork springs to show up(which btw have gone on what appears to be an exceptional tour of canada(according to the tracking)), I think I have worn out my rear tire, which went from showing signs of squaring, but still rideable, to at the wear bars in a couple(three) tanks of fuel. So I am now thinking I should put the spring installation on hold and get on replacing that rear tire first, otherwise it will be difficult to tell what makes the best improvement in bike feel.

Quote:
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Swap the rear to a PR3 now while the front is still good. You have the tires fighting you and each other, the PR3's like to roll through anything, the PP3 wants to throw you down.
Though I love carving canyons and backroad twisties, the reality is I live in the prairies of Alberta near Edmonton and don't have all that many corners to carve without riding many miles of straight roads to find them. So I wonder, is the pr3 rear the ideal match for the pr3 front? and what about rear tire size? should I stay stock or is there another size that makes further improvement in the 919?

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post #26 of 78 Old 06-20-2018, 06:48 PM
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As I wait for my fork springs to show up(which btw have gone on what appears to be an exceptional tour of canada(according to the tracking)), I think I have worn out my rear tire, which went from showing signs of squaring, but still rideable, to at the wear bars in a couple(three) tanks of fuel. So I am now thinking I should put the spring installation on hold and get on replacing that rear tire first, otherwise it will be difficult to tell what makes the best improvement in bike feel.



Though I love carving canyons and backroad twisties, the reality is I live in the prairies of Alberta near Edmonton and don't have all that many corners to carve without riding many miles of straight roads to find them. So I wonder, is the pr3 rear the ideal match for the pr3 front? and what about rear tire size? should I stay stock or is there another size that makes further improvement in the 919?
I've yet to read a W'T'er post about PR3s that didn't extoll their virtues.
I'm not at all current whether there are still PR3s in the system, or whether you'll be stuck with a later iteration.
If you can get a fairly recently manufactured PR3 rear, you can't go wrong with it.
If you can't, I'd think the later PR?'s would be compatible, but I'd be asking about that and not assuming.
PRx's in general are well compounded for our climate re road use, they stick in the wet, cold wet, and cold dry, and have decent grip on warm pavement.
I'm sure I remember someone posting in the past year or two of having done a track day on PR3s, and had a good time on them.
A PRx will also last many many more miles.
Stick to the OEM tire sizes in every respect, as in width AND aspect ratio.

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post #27 of 78 Old 06-20-2018, 08:43 PM
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all this suspension talk, ima get my front forks done too :P
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post #28 of 78 Old 06-21-2018, 03:28 AM
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all this suspension talk, ima get my front forks done too :P
You won't regret it.

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post #29 of 78 Old 06-21-2018, 04:37 AM
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PR3 or PR4, either way, you won't regret it!

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post #30 of 78 Old 06-21-2018, 09:37 AM Thread Starter
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PR3 or PR4, either way, you won't regret it!
pr3 ordered this morning. I hope its fresh

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post #31 of 78 Old 06-21-2018, 10:43 AM
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pr3 ordered this morning. I hope its fresh
Whomever you are buying it from should be telling you the build date code if you ask for it, and they are selling from on hand inventory.
In any event, when you get tire, you can just as easily read it yourself.

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post #32 of 78 Old 06-21-2018, 04:25 PM
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Hey, I just want to throw in my opinion on this. People here have way more experience with the 919 than me, but I will share this in case it is helpful.

I also did not like the feel of the 919 in turns and what I concluded was that the fairly relaxed geometry needs a 'pointy' or triangular shaped front tire to help it feel quicker side-to-side. This perception can be greatly influenced by the bikes you've owned and ridden and what you prefer or call 'normal'... but I also know that PR3 is an extremely "round" tire, and the transition as you lean it over feels really slow (I have had PR3's but not on my 919). I actually used this to "fix" the handling of my 2014 Zero S, which has like a 3.2" trail and felt too twitchy when I bought it. The PR3's helped to stabilize the bike.

On the 919, switching to Continental Sport Attacks (which are pointy) helped quicken the steering and and the bike felt more responsive and "normal" (for me).

So sorry I didn't jump in here sooner, but I guess you will figure out yourself whether the PR3 works better or worse for you.

I also went through an entire front fork rebuild with 0.90 kg/mm springs and 5W oil, and that definitely helped. 5W oil still had good control. There is alot of seal stiction on the 919 front forks.
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post #33 of 78 Old 06-21-2018, 06:02 PM
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I'm on my second set of PR3's on the 919. They will "roll" in as quickly or slowly as you want them to. They will not "throw" you into a corner, ever. Perfect for the 919 IMHO.
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post #34 of 78 Old 06-21-2018, 06:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Manzanita View Post
Hey, I just want to throw in my opinion on this. People here have way more experience with the 919 than me, but I will share this in case it is helpful.

I also did not like the feel of the 919 in turns and what I concluded was that the fairly relaxed geometry needs a 'pointy' or triangular shaped front tire to help it feel quicker side-to-side. This perception can be greatly influenced by the bikes you've owned and ridden and what you prefer or call 'normal'... but I also know that PR3 is an extremely "round" tire, and the transition as you lean it over feels really slow (I have had PR3's but not on my 919). I actually used this to "fix" the handling of my 2014 Zero S, which has like a 3.2" trail and felt too twitchy when I bought it. The PR3's helped to stabilize the bike.

On the 919, switching to Continental Sport Attacks (which are pointy) helped quicken the steering and and the bike felt more responsive and "normal" (for me).

So sorry I didn't jump in here sooner, but I guess you will figure out yourself whether the PR3 works better or worse for you.

I also went through an entire front fork rebuild with 0.90 kg/mm springs and 5W oil, and that definitely helped. 5W oil still had good control. There is alot of seal stiction on the 919 front forks.
I'm curious about your front rebound setting.
How far out from full hard are you running at?

I'm glad the 5W you used worked OK.
I tried the Racetech 2.5/5 and it offered no control to speak of.
The fork was like a pogo stick.
That was with stock valving and stacks.

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post #35 of 78 Old 06-21-2018, 10:10 PM
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If you remember we messaged about a potential setup.
I have all the goodies. Will go 140mm with 5W and 15mm for preload:






Quote:
Originally Posted by mcromo44 View Post
I'm curious about your front rebound setting.
How far out from full hard are you running at?

I'm glad the 5W you used worked OK.
I tried the Racetech 2.5/5 and it offered no control to speak of.
The fork was like a pogo stick.
That was with stock valving and stacks.
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post #36 of 78 Old 06-22-2018, 06:56 AM Thread Starter
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maybe I should just be buying this one for the upgrades.



Please view this ad:

Honda cb919 ,
https://www.kijiji.ca/v-sport-tourin...nt=app_android

Price: $*3,500

Download the application from the Google Play Store.
http://goo.gl/Hs9Yg

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post #37 of 78 Old 06-22-2018, 03:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ewmin3m View Post
If you remember we messaged about a potential setup.
I have all the goodies. Will go 140mm with 5W and 15mm for preload:
Are you using their online stack build determinator?
Or using the written instructions?

Are you drilling a low speed compression bleed port into each of the compression valves?
I don't think they specify the where and what size for the 919.
Years ago, zaq123 found some info, I can't remember if it was bike specific but the drawing he posted showed a call for a #55 drill bit = 0.0520 in.
(Mine was done when I had my forks done by a local builder, I don't know what size he used and never asked. What I do remember was that what he started with was too big for his liking, so he plugged it, tried another size, was happy with it, then did the second one with the finalized size.)
If the latest Racetech info doesn't specify a drill bit size, I'd be asking them.
If you're going to all the trouble of valves/stacks/oil/oil level/installed preload, I'd suggest making a point of getting a drill size from them and doing the porting.

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post #38 of 78 Old 06-22-2018, 03:49 PM
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Yes, I've printed out everything from racetech. They provide all the info, size and location (with diagrams and such).


They even recommend the 140mm oil height and 15mm preload :P




Quote:
Originally Posted by mcromo44 View Post
Are you using their online stack build determinator?
Or using the written instructions?

Are you drilling a low speed compression bleed port into each of the compression valves?
I don't think they specify the where and what size for the 919.
Years ago, zaq123 found some info, I can't remember if it was bike specific but the drawing he posted showed a call for a #55 drill bit = 0.0520 in.
(Mine was done when I had my forks done by a local builder, I don't know what size he used and never asked. What I do remember was that what he started with was too big for his liking, so he plugged it, tried another size, was happy with it, then did the second one with the finalized size.)
If the latest Racetech info doesn't specify a drill bit size, I'd be asking them.
If you're going to all the trouble of valves/stacks/oil/oil level/installed preload, I'd suggest making a point of getting a drill size from them and doing the porting.

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post #39 of 78 Old 06-22-2018, 08:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ewmin3m View Post
Yes, I've printed out everything from racetech. They provide all the info, size and location (with diagrams and such).


They even recommend the 140mm oil height and 15mm preload :P
I'd really appreciate knowing what drill size they called up for the low speed compression bleed port.

ALSO
If you're OK with it, can we arrange for you to scan all the paperwork and get it to me so I can put it into our Drop Box?
I think it would be a worthy addition as an example build sheet with instructions.

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post #40 of 78 Old 06-22-2018, 10:15 PM
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I take it it's from the compression valve?


It says here: Gold Valve Piston Bleed Hole: 1.3mm





Quote:
Originally Posted by mcromo44 View Post
I'd really appreciate knowing what drill size they called up for the low speed compression bleed port.

ALSO
If you're OK with it, can we arrange for you to scan all the paperwork and get it to me so I can put it into our Drop Box?
I think it would be a worthy addition as an example build sheet with instructions.
Attached Images
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File Type: jpeg 2.jpeg (361.3 KB, 7 views)
File Type: jpeg 1.jpeg (315.2 KB, 7 views)
File Type: jpeg 4.jpeg (325.2 KB, 7 views)
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