Fork Raisers - Wrist Twisters
 
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post #1 of 23 Old 08-31-2006, 06:56 AM Thread Starter
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Fork Raisers

Where can i get a set of 10mm fork raisers and is there a sight or thread that shows how to install them?

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post #2 of 23 Old 08-31-2006, 06:59 AM
 
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Pat, If I understand you correctly, all you need to do is remove the front tire and loosen the 4 bolts on the triple-clamps to raise the forks. Try 5mm at a time.

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post #3 of 23 Old 08-31-2006, 07:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Patmicg View Post
Where can i get a set of 10mm fork raisers and is there a sight or thread that shows how to install them?
Fork raisers???

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post #4 of 23 Old 08-31-2006, 07:02 AM
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Is this what you are looking for?


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post #5 of 23 Old 08-31-2006, 07:09 AM
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or r u lookin for bar risers? (bolt on the top triple to raise the bars a bit)

if u'r a 'big guy', then droppin in heavier fork springs will eliminate the sag of the stock sticks and effectively raise the front end

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post #6 of 23 Old 08-31-2006, 07:41 AM
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Um, just be careful if you adjust them. I did it for the first time the other night. Not knowing what to expect, the right fork slid all the way up until it hit the handlebars. No damage but it took me forever to figure out how to move it back down into position as I was by myself.

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post #7 of 23 Old 08-31-2006, 08:48 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by m51142 View Post
Is this what you are looking for?

I feel like a dumb ass yeah thats what im looking to do any help?

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post #8 of 23 Old 08-31-2006, 10:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Patmicg View Post
I feel like a dumb ass yeah thats what im looking to do any help?
Never feel that way, sometimes what I think and what I say never make sense.

Anyway, I give me a little time and I will put together a how-to. It is not hard and you don't need to remove the front wheel.

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post #9 of 23 Old 08-31-2006, 03:47 PM
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Added... How-to raise your fork tubes to the Helpful Topics for new 919 owners:

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post #10 of 23 Old 08-31-2006, 04:02 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks your a life saver! I'm gonna do it this weekend

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post #11 of 23 Old 09-01-2006, 11:34 AM
 
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Mike, how do you insure that the front wheel is still aligned properly if you don't take the tire off? My point is that with the tire on you can't be sure how the axle is lining up in the fork tubes. So one fork may actually be higher than the other. If you go by the marks on the fork tubes your axle is not guaranteed to be align with the fork tubes. I always set the fork height on one fork and then set the other fork height according to how the axle lines up in the fork tubes. Basically raise or lower the loose fork until the axle spins freely with 2 fingers. Does this make sense?

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post #12 of 23 Old 09-01-2006, 11:46 AM
 
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Anyone have a pic of how they are stock? i bought my bike used.. looked into doing this mod and it looks as if they have already been raised. (he also did the flapper mod and tail tidy) seems like the kinda free mod he would have done...

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post #13 of 23 Old 09-01-2006, 03:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NewRedRider View Post
Mike, how do you insure that the front wheel is still aligned properly if you don't take the tire off? My point is that with the tire on you can't be sure how the axle is lining up in the fork tubes. So one fork may actually be higher than the other. If you go by the marks on the fork tubes your axle is not guaranteed to be align with the fork tubes. I always set the fork height on one fork and then set the other fork height according to how the axle lines up in the fork tubes. Basically raise or lower the loose fork until the axle spins freely with 2 fingers. Does this make sense?
I have never had any mis-alignment problem with my procedure. Keep in mind the 919 does not have those lines on the fork tubes. I use a caliper to measure the tubes which is accurate to 0.001" I guess for peace of mind one could always loosen the axle pinch bolts, push up and down on the handle bars or clip-ons and then retighten the pinch bolts.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jackelfox
Anyone have a pic of how they are stock? i bought my bike used.. looked into doing this mod and it looks as if they have already been raised. (he also did the flapper mod and tail tidy) seems like the kinda free mod he would have done...
You are already looking at the pic. Without to 10 mm the fork tube would be flush with the upper triple clamp.

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post #14 of 23 Old 09-02-2006, 01:51 AM
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Originally Posted by NewRedRider View Post
My point is that with the tire on you can't be sure how the axle is lining up in the fork tubes. So one fork may actually be higher than the other.
No it won't be. (well.. not while the wheel is actually on the ground)
You're looking at it wrong. No disrespect intended...
With the wheel on the ground, both fork sliders (the lower part of the forks) will still be exactly the same position as they're ever been.
However, if one of the tubes is higher in the tripple clamps than the other, the spring on that leg will be less compressed (or rather, less pre-loaded) than the spring in the other leg.
Imagine for a second that the bike is sitting on the ground normally, and you simply release the triple clamps on one side,(DON'T actually do this for real) the tube for that fork will slide itself upwards in the triple clamps due to the spring pressure. (And the weight of the bike but we're ignoring the fact that the bike will also settle downwards a little at the same time for this exercise.. that's just because the weight would now only be supported by one front spring not two).

The upshot of this is that if the two tubes are not exactly set to the same position, you will not affect the axle alignment, but it will affect the pre-load balance between the two fork legs.
Provided the difference is not stupidly huge, it would have much the same affect as setting too much or too little pre-load on one side compared to the other. There will also be some minor geometry difference between the two sides. So it won't affect wheel / axle alignment, but it will affect stability etc in hard cornering as the suspension loads up slightly sooner on one side than the other, but a mm or two on one side or the other will be very hard to detect when riding it unless you're fairly experienced at working with suspension settings and know what to "look" for.

I've dropped mine by ten mil, and have noticed the bike feels slightly more eager to turn in, but only in the tighter turns.
I've just gone two up, up through my fave run of twisties today and can state quite categorically that stability is not a problem.

Nice one... Thanks Mike!

post #15 of 23 Old 09-02-2006, 02:20 PM
 
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Well Dropbear I don't think you understand how I'm looking at this. Let me explain. The problem is not with the spring load on the forks but the axle being perpendicular to the ground and square to the tire. That's more important then the height measured and the spring load of each fork being exactly the same. The true test is if the axle will spin freely when inserted into the fork tubes without the tire. If the axle won't spin or binds then the forks are not aligned regardless of the measurements taken at the top of the triple clamps.

The reason I would recommend you remove the tire to set the fork tube height is you can't tell if your fork tubes are bent with the tire on. Removing the tire takes a only a few minutes and helps insure that there's no unseen problem with the forks. A lot of times people have a mild low-side and never realize that they have actually tweaked a fork tube. I've seen forks that were 1/2" out of alignment with each other because of a crash.

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post #16 of 23 Old 09-02-2006, 04:33 PM
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the correct way to reassemble forks is tighten the front axle first. nothing wrong with blogging though.

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post #17 of 23 Old 09-03-2006, 01:07 AM
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Well Dropbear I don't think you understand how I'm looking at this. Let me explain... .
Actually, I DO understand how you're looking at it, and I still say you're looking at it wrong.
Ignoring the rest of it where you're talking about damaged forks etc...

The lower half of these forks (the sliders) move independantly of each other on their respective tubes. This includes rotational movement as well as perpendicular movement. It is the axle that actually does the aligning of the sliders. Not the other way around.

With the bike completely unloaded, ie with the wheel in the air, then the two fork legs will each try to extend to their fully extended lengths.
In this situation, it's possible that because one leg can extend further than the other (remember we're talking about when one tube is higher than the other in the triples) in relation to the bike, then you may get an axle that is not quite true with respect to it's lateral orientation. in other words, not exactly horizontal.
Though even in this scenario, you would need to have excessive slop in the way the tubes are fitting into the sliders.
Once the wheel is back on terra firma, the independant nature of the way the sliders move will put the axle in it's correct position. You will then only have the imbalanced preload situation as described. Again, all this is assuming the forks are in good condition to start with and that we're only talking about 10 mil or so difference from one side to the other.
After any crashes etc, all bets are off. But then you'd only be doing this "mod" if your forks were in good condition anyway right?

Having said all that, if you feel better removing the wheel to do it, (shift the tubes in the clamps, that is) then go ahead. no harm can be done. It's just simply not necessary. I know.. I did it!

I did mine by putting the bike up on it's center stand, placing a jack and a block of wood under the header pipes, use the jack to just take the weight off the front wheel, loosen the clamps bolts, lower the jack to slide the tubes up into the triples and do up the clamps. Easy. No wheel removal required. I did have to give one of the tubes a helping hand to slide upwards a little, but because the tubes move independantly of each other, this was very simple to do. I just had to wrap my hand around the tube and twist it slightly back and forth while it slid itself up into the triple because of the pressure form the spring.
Axle and wheel alignment completely unaffected.

Quote:
Originally Posted by drivit
the correct way to reassemble forks is tighten the front axle first.
I'd argue this point too. Otherwise you'd be reassembling your forks every time you changed your tyre. Because tightening the axle is done while the forks are still assembled on the bike, yeah?

Please note that I am in no way trying to bag anyone here. I mean no disrespect to anyone. Just trying to correct a couple of misconceptions.

Cheers all!

post #18 of 23 Old 09-03-2006, 09:46 AM
 
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Originally Posted by DropBear 9 View Post
Actually, I DO understand how you're looking at it, and I still say you're looking at it wrong.
Ignoring the rest of it where you're talking about damaged forks etc...

Please note that I am in no way trying to bag anyone here. I mean no disrespect to anyone. Just trying to correct a couple of misconceptions.

Cheers all!
I wouldn't "ignore" anything here. You're assumption is that the forks are perfect. That's a mistake in my opinion.

There is no maybe the axle will be out of true. Most all of them are. Even perfectly new forks can be out of alignment from the factory. People crash all the time and very few of them ever inspect their forks afterwards. If you're going to do this mod why not take the opportunity to inspect the forks thoroughly? Takes all of 5 minutes. How often is that anyway? Once or twice for the average rider? Why not true the axle while you've got the bike up and apart? Sometimes I agree that you can do things on the short but this isn't one of them IMO.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DropBear 9 View Post
Please note that I am in no way trying to bag anyone here. I mean no disrespect to anyone. Just trying to correct a couple of misconceptions.

Cheers all!
Not disrepsecting someone means that you respect their opinion, right or wrong. Telling people that they don't know what they're looking at and are wrong makes you come off very arrogant and disrepectful. Your way may not be the right way for everyone else.

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post #19 of 23 Old 09-04-2006, 04:59 AM
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I wouldn't "ignore" anything here. You're assumption is that the forks are perfect. That's a mistake in my opinion.

There is no maybe the axle will be out of true. Most all of them are. Even perfectly new forks can be out of alignment from the factory. People crash all the time and very few of them ever inspect their forks afterwards. If you're going to do this mod why not take the opportunity to inspect the forks thoroughly? Takes all of 5 minutes. How often is that anyway? Once or twice for the average rider? Why not true the axle while you've got the bike up and apart? Sometimes I agree that you can do things on the short but this isn't one of them IMO.
Sigh.. some people are like the string in a bow... They just don't get the point!

Quote:
Not disrepsecting someone means that you respect their opinion, right or wrong.
You see, I DO respect your opinion.. even though it's wrong...

You though... Well.. if you feel like taking offence when none is intended and in fact stated as such.. Then like they say.. it's a free country..
All I was trying to do was clarify some misconceptions and misunderstandings.

Sorry I bothered!

post #20 of 23 Old 09-04-2006, 03:17 PM
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assemble the forks with the axle, wheel and fender complete-its an assembly- then pull the tubes up and into the clamps, don't make me tell you again.

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post #21 of 23 Old 09-04-2006, 11:47 PM
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assemble the forks with the axle, wheel and fender complete-its an assembly- then pull the tubes up and into the clamps, don't make me tell you again.
Ahh.. I see the point you're making!
Yes and this means you don't need to remove the wheel to shift the forks in the triples unless you wish to do further inspections at the same time!

whew!

post #22 of 23 Old 09-05-2006, 07:33 AM
 
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Originally Posted by DropBear 9 View Post
Sigh.. some people are like the string in a bow... They just don't get the point!

You see, I DO respect your opinion.. even though it's wrong...

You though... Well.. if you feel like taking offence when none is intended and in fact stated as such.. Then like they say.. it's a free country..
All I was trying to do was clarify some misconceptions and misunderstandings.

Sorry I bothered!
And no matter how nice you try to explain your point of view some people will still be arrogant d!cks about it. You start of with an insult and then claim "no disrespect intended". That's like slapping someone in the head and then saying, "Oh sorry. I didn't hit you."

I'm not sure what your 919 SM says but the 600RR SM is pretty clear. But your way is the right way. I'll make a mental note of that for future reference.

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post #23 of 23 Old 09-06-2006, 06:08 AM
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NRR, you have a PM!

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