coolant hose slinky? what? - Wrist Twisters
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 60 Old 06-08-2010, 06:35 PM Thread Starter
Princeps Prior
 
arctic954's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Posts: 1,816
Rep Power: 1
 
coolant hose slinky? what?

yep --- not new to sportbikes. (this is bike #16) But am new to the 919.

Is there ACTUALLY a reason there is a 'slinky' on the left side lower coolant hose? --- or is it simply decorative.

--------You mean to tell me that the slinky actually will dissipate heat from the header away from the coolant hose?

Educate me here...

arctic954 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 60 Old 06-08-2010, 07:02 PM
Tirone shoelaces
 
TexasTraffic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Central Texas
Posts: 744
Rep Power: 1
 
My bet is armor.

TexasTraffic is offline  
post #3 of 60 Old 06-08-2010, 07:05 PM Thread Starter
Princeps Prior
 
arctic954's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Posts: 1,816
Rep Power: 1
 
....that is something I did NOT think of.... and would make since --- hence the bike doesn't have a belly pan to protect the hose.....

Any OTHER ideas or TRUE explanations?

arctic954 is offline  
post #4 of 60 Old 06-08-2010, 07:10 PM
CG
 
catonsvilleguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Catonsville, MD
Posts: 593
Rep Power: 1
 
I think it has to be crash protection. Otherwise that hose would be spewing coolant all over the place if it touched pavement. Might even be a DOT requirement.

catonsvilleguy is offline  
post #5 of 60 Old 06-08-2010, 07:10 PM
So, you're a human...
 
adamjayp's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Nor Cal
Posts: 470
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Veteran 
Total Awards: 1

I thought it was armour too, and maybe to keep the hose from kinking.

adamjayp is offline  
post #6 of 60 Old 06-08-2010, 07:26 PM Thread Starter
Princeps Prior
 
arctic954's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Posts: 1,816
Rep Power: 1
 
he, he..... yep.

Pretty sure my daughter is going to have a new toy......

arctic954 is offline  
post #7 of 60 Old 06-08-2010, 07:29 PM
rmb
Let's go!
 
rmb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Sussex Couty NJ
Posts: 7,655
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Wrist Twisters Event Attendance Wrist Twisters Event Attendance Wrist Twisters Event Attendance Wrist Twisters Event Attendance 
Total Awards: 9

I have seen a few that installed stainless braid, looks cool

rmb is offline  
post #8 of 60 Old 06-08-2010, 07:48 PM
dr1
dr1
 
dr1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Glen Cove, NY
Posts: 193
Rep Power: 1
 
same reason any other vehicle has one, to help keep the hose from collapsing.

dr1 is offline  
post #9 of 60 Old 06-08-2010, 07:58 PM
(Quintus) Pilus Prior
 
Lemonhead's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 2,613
Rep Power: 1
 
or over expansion maybe?

Lemonhead is offline  
post #10 of 60 Old 06-08-2010, 08:09 PM
STR-III
 
cmurphy84's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Western KY
Posts: 4,989
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Donation Donation 
Total Awards: 2

I always thought it was to protect it from flying debris and in a crash. Nothing would be cooler that running down the road on a hot summer day and having a sharp rock rupture your main coolant hose and spewing 200 degree liquid all over your left leg. Stranded and burned? Sweet!

Press Any Key To Continue.
cmurphy84 is offline  
post #11 of 60 Old 06-08-2010, 08:59 PM
Cornicen
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Henderson, NV
Posts: 596
Rep Power: 1
 
It provides a magnetic effect on the silicates in the coolant...which aligns the molecules as they push through the cylinders. This causes a tumbling effect of the molecules whenever there is a sharp change in the fluid pathway, so that the boundary layers are disturbed, resulting in a higher rate of heat exchange between the metal and the coolant. So, although the internal metal surfaces will be cooler, the coolant reads hotter on the gauge. The original idea actually came from Scotty, when he forgot to remove the coils providing support and protection of a flux capacitor during shipping, and installed it with the coils on.

Blackheart is offline  
post #12 of 60 Old 06-08-2010, 09:06 PM Thread Starter
Princeps Prior
 
arctic954's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Posts: 1,816
Rep Power: 1
 
at first I was confused.... then I saw you were from Nevada. ha, ha.


arctic954 is offline  
post #13 of 60 Old 06-08-2010, 09:48 PM
Le So Cal Troll
 
nd4spdbh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: So Cal
Posts: 5,766
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by arctic954 View Post
at first I was confused.... then I saw you were from Nevada. ha, ha.

OMFG thats hilarious.

another vote for armor from flying front wheel debris and or a crash.

nd4spdbh is offline  
post #14 of 60 Old 06-08-2010, 09:51 PM
Gets censored
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: FL
Posts: 1,839
Rep Power: 1
 
It's to keep your hose from collapsing, dont take it off.

brian is offline  
post #15 of 60 Old 06-08-2010, 09:52 PM
Gets censored
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: FL
Posts: 1,839
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dr1 View Post
same reason any other vehicle has one, to help keep the hose from collapsing.
lol, opps. ^ what he said.

brian is offline  
post #16 of 60 Old 06-09-2010, 12:14 AM
Pob
Tirone
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: UK
Posts: 53
Rep Power: 1
 
Keeps the hose in position/shape and gives some protection against scuffing was what a Honda dealer told me.

Pob is offline  
post #17 of 60 Old 06-09-2010, 05:01 AM
Fool in the Rain
 
HondaJim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Louisville, Kentucky
Posts: 10,286
Rep Power: 1
 
Garage

Awards Showcase
Donation Wrist Twisters Event Attendance Extraordinary Ride Wrist Twisters Event Attendance 
Total Awards: 4

It's for entertainment value when you crash without a helmet. You can take the slinky off and play with it for the rest of your born days.

"Towards the end of the vid, it looks like she may have had a bafflectomy." - MarylandMike
HondaJim is offline  
post #18 of 60 Old 06-09-2010, 05:22 AM
(Quintus) Pilus Prior
 
Lemonhead's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 2,613
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackheart View Post
It provides a magnetic effect on the silicates in the coolant...which aligns the molecules as they push through the cylinders. This causes a tumbling effect of the molecules whenever there is a sharp change in the fluid pathway, so that the boundary layers are disturbed, resulting in a higher rate of heat exchange between the metal and the coolant. So, although the internal metal surfaces will be cooler, the coolant reads hotter on the gauge. The original idea actually came from Scotty, when he forgot to remove the coils providing support and protection of a flux capacitor during shipping, and installed it with the coils on.
maybe a bit far fetched, but, an aftermarket radiator by a diesel hotrod facility in pittsburg has dimples in the tubes to slow and tumble the coolant as it passes through.

so.......

Lemonhead is offline  
post #19 of 60 Old 06-09-2010, 05:34 AM
When in doubt.....GAS IT!
 
hasbeenracer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: SO.CAL
Posts: 2,528
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Donation 
Total Awards: 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by dr1 View Post
same reason any other vehicle has one, to help keep the hose from collapsing.
Quote:
Originally Posted by brian View Post
It's to keep your hose from collapsing, dont take it off.
The spring would have to be on the inside to keep it from collapsing.
Quote:
Originally Posted by adamjayp View Post
I thought it was armour too, and maybe to keep the hose from kinking.
It's a pre-formed hose, so it shouldn't kink once installed. The armour/expansion theories sound plausible though.

Professional
hasbeenracer is offline  
post #20 of 60 Old 06-09-2010, 07:04 AM
dr1
dr1
 
dr1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Glen Cove, NY
Posts: 193
Rep Power: 1
 
it wouldnt need to be on the inside actually, although it would probably work better. You can buy a similar thing at the auto parts store so you can bend straight hose into the shape you need without it collapsing. A round hose is going to try to oval if you want to pinch it shut.

dr1 is offline  
post #21 of 60 Old 06-09-2010, 07:57 AM
STR-III
 
cmurphy84's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Western KY
Posts: 4,989
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Donation Donation 
Total Awards: 2

Maybe we should contact Mythbusters on this one.

Press Any Key To Continue.
cmurphy84 is offline  
post #22 of 60 Old 06-09-2010, 08:00 AM Thread Starter
Princeps Prior
 
arctic954's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Posts: 1,816
Rep Power: 1
 
so....being the nimrod that I am.

I took off the slink last night to do a test......rode the bike to work this morning on my 30 mile commute.

I went to pass a semi ---- and the radiator hose split..... throwing coolant over me, my helmet, and my rear tire. The semi got completely juiced and veered into the median. Because of the spray, I couldn't see and while heading for the other center median.....the rear brake wouldn't work from the coolant. Just had to lay her down.....slid several hundred feet and JUST about went off the edge of a bridge.






----

just kidding. The hose seems to be fine....for now.

arctic954 is offline  
post #23 of 60 Old 06-09-2010, 08:49 AM
Cornicen
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Henderson, NV
Posts: 596
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lemonhead View Post
maybe a bit far fetched, but, an aftermarket radiator by a diesel hotrod facility in pittsburg has dimples in the tubes to slow and tumble the coolant as it passes through.

so.......
It's true that breaking up a boundary layer allows for better heat transfer. It's NOT true that the metal would be cooler while the gauge would read hotter. We use this technology in heating/cooling blood in open heart surgery. This same characteristic (breaking up the bondary layer) increases gas diffusion in artificial lungs.

The key is to break up the layer without significantly increasing resistance, and therefore the pressure required to pump the fluid.

It's also true that Scotty talked about flux capacitors.

Blackheart is offline  
post #24 of 60 Old 06-09-2010, 08:59 AM
When in doubt.....GAS IT!
 
hasbeenracer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: SO.CAL
Posts: 2,528
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Donation 
Total Awards: 1

When the engine is running, the hose has positive pressure inside it. Exploding would be the issue, not collapsing.
Whatever the case, I'm willing to bet the Engineers at Honda had a good reason to put it there.

Professional
hasbeenracer is offline  
post #25 of 60 Old 06-09-2010, 09:15 AM
When in doubt.....GAS IT!
 
hasbeenracer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: SO.CAL
Posts: 2,528
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Donation 
Total Awards: 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackheart View Post
It's NOT true that the metal would be cooler while the gauge would read hotter.
Blackheart, I've personally seen head temps drop while water temps increased (before re-entering the radiator) on our Midget and Sprint Cars using Red Line water wetter. How would you explain this?

Professional
hasbeenracer is offline  
post #26 of 60 Old 06-09-2010, 09:53 AM
Old, Bold rider
 
robtharalson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Aurora, Colorado
Posts: 2,382
Rep Power: 1
 
Garage

Awards Showcase
Donation Veteran Community Leadership 
Total Awards: 3

I can attest to the protection from flying debris reason. On my commute to work one day a car kicked up a piece of steel ... something that flew across two lanes of traffic and hit the lower radiator hose on my 919, bounced off and slid across my left leg, cutting completely though the leg of my riding pants but not into my leg. Upon inspection the coil had been cut almost completely through on three loops but the hose wasn't even touched.

That coil of wire my not suit your vision of what your bike should look like, but it definitely has a quite specific function.

As to preventing it from collapsing, the hose will never collapse unless there is a partial vacuum in the system which can only occur if the low pressure relief valve on the radiator cap is stuck or the reserve tank hose is pinched off. Either way it indicates a problem that must be addressed and not a normal operating condition.

Rob

If it has already been done, it is safe to assume it is possible to do it.
On the other hand, if it has not been done never assume it is impossible to do it.
------- Rob --------
robtharalson is offline  
post #27 of 60 Old 06-09-2010, 12:03 PM
Cornicen
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Henderson, NV
Posts: 596
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hasbeenracer View Post
Blackheart, I've personally seen head temps drop while water temps increased (before re-entering the radiator) on our Midget and Sprint Cars using Red Line water wetter. How would you explain this?
What you describe is certainly possible due to less vaporization of the coolant liquid occuring on the surface of the metal, so, more efficient heat transfer into the coolant, which allows the metal to potentially be cooler.

The statement I made was that the temperature of the metal wouldn't be cooler while the coolant GAUGE reads higher. The gauge reading would remain constant, as it is mostly affected by the thermostat. Of course, this assumes not-extreme conditions...such as racing, really high ambient temps, idling, hillclimbing, and inadequate or undersized cooling systems.

(Also, the gauge reading on "normal" systems is not where you are talking about measuring temperatures.)

Blackheart is offline  
post #28 of 60 Old 06-09-2010, 12:23 PM
BrokeRecord
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: West Monroe,La
Posts: 1,180
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Donation Donation Donation 
Total Awards: 3

Has-been, were ya'll running Alky? I've seen them come in boiling with frost on the intake!
My vote, protection and expansion.

[
brokerecord is offline  
post #29 of 60 Old 06-09-2010, 12:37 PM
I WANNA RIDE!
 
garyb900's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Elgin, IL
Posts: 1,480
Rep Power: 1
 
On the parts microfiche it's listed as "15: PROTR, RADIATOR HOSE
(LOWER),A AC 1470518-001 $32.58"
I would take "PROTR" to be protector.

garyb900 is offline  
post #30 of 60 Old 06-09-2010, 01:17 PM
Gets censored
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: FL
Posts: 1,839
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by robtharalson View Post
As to preventing it from collapsing, the hose will never collapse unless there is a partial vacuum in the system which can only occur if the low pressure relief valve on the radiator cap is stuck or the reserve tank hose is pinched off. Either way it indicates a problem that must be addressed and not a normal operating condition.

Rob
I had a mustang that a buddy of mine and I built I had an issue with the bottom rad hose collapsing. A old school racer instructed me to run a spring thiingy on the hose.... never happened again. Just my experience.

brian is offline  
post #31 of 60 Old 06-09-2010, 02:42 PM
CG
 
catonsvilleguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Catonsville, MD
Posts: 593
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by brian View Post
I had a mustang that a buddy of mine and I built I had an issue with the bottom rad hose collapsing. A old school racer instructed me to run a spring thiingy on the hose.... never happened again. Just my experience.
Except the "spring thiingy" is supposed to **in** the hose..........

A lot of factory hoses come with such a device in them. This is generally on the lower hose, presumably because the water pumps sucks on that fat black tubular thang

catonsvilleguy is offline  
post #32 of 60 Old 06-09-2010, 02:59 PM
(Quintus) Pilus Prior
 
Lemonhead's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 2,613
Rep Power: 1
 
Arctic !!! You Forker! You had me going.......


Diesel trucks have a similar binding surrounding the "soft joiners" on the induction system with hose clamps at each end. The boost is enough to expand the circumference enough to cause them to shorten and "blow off" from the hard parts.

I've got experience with that one.

Lemonhead is offline  
post #33 of 60 Old 06-09-2010, 03:35 PM
Discen
 
bwoso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Chardon, Ohio
Posts: 267
Rep Power: 1
 
When a hose collapses there is a smaller diameter in one direction, but in the perpendicular direction the diameter increases, so to remove the risk of collapse the slinky thing doesn't need to be on the inside, it just needs to stop either the decrease or increase. With that said, I always thought there was positive pressure in a coolant system, so I am going with protecting the hose.

bwoso is offline  
post #34 of 60 Old 06-09-2010, 03:39 PM
(Quintus) Pilus Prior
 
Lemonhead's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 2,613
Rep Power: 1
 
Do we know what kind of psi this system gets to in an arizona summer?

Lemonhead is offline  
post #35 of 60 Old 06-09-2010, 04:15 PM
Aquilifer
 
bucky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: alaska
Posts: 1,249
Rep Power: 1
 
it's for looks ONLY.

"yeah, even though the rider will lose an appendage from a flying piece of steel, he'll thank and love us at Honda more because he won't have to buy a new $25 radiator hose !" doesn't make sense. radiator hoses aren't exactly frequently pierced by rocks and road debris. there's rubber right behind the front tire, to and from the "heat exchanger" mount for the oil filter with no protection, and it's right in the line of fire.

bucky is offline  
post #36 of 60 Old 06-09-2010, 04:23 PM
Hastatus Posterior
 
Farab's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Auckland, NZ
Posts: 1,454
Rep Power: 1
 
I'd say armour.

Farab is offline  
post #37 of 60 Old 06-09-2010, 04:29 PM
When in doubt.....GAS IT!
 
hasbeenracer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: SO.CAL
Posts: 2,528
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Donation 
Total Awards: 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by robtharalson View Post
I can attest to the protection from flying debris reason. On my commute to work one day a car kicked up a piece of steel ... something that flew across two lanes of traffic and hit the lower radiator hose on my 919, bounced off and slid across my left leg, cutting completely though the leg of my riding pants but not into my leg. Upon inspection the coil had been cut almost completely through on three loops but the hose wasn't even touched.

Rob
I hope you bought a Lottory ticket that day Rob, because that could have turned out alot worse. Go knock on some wood.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackheart View Post
What you describe is certainly possible due to less vaporization of the coolant liquid occuring on the surface of the metal, so, more efficient heat transfer into the coolant, which allows the metal to potentially be cooler.

The statement I made was that the temperature of the metal wouldn't be cooler while the coolant GAUGE reads higher. The gauge reading would remain constant, as it is mostly affected by the thermostat. Of course, this assumes not-extreme conditions...such as racing, really high ambient temps, idling, hillclimbing, and inadequate or undersized cooling systems.

(Also, the gauge reading on "normal" systems is not where you are talking about measuring temperatures.)
Thanks Blackheart, your explanation was much easier to understand than the one I got from the guys at Red Line.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brokerecord View Post
Has-been, were ya'll running Alky? I've seen them come in boiling with frost on the intake!
My vote, protection and expansion.
Yes, methanol. I've never seen frost, but I've seen alot of condensation on the injectors.

Quote:
Originally Posted by garyb900 View Post
On the parts microfiche it's listed as "15: PROTR, RADIATOR HOSE
(LOWER),A AC 1470518-001 $32.58"
I would take "PROTR" to be protector.
That certainly makes sense!

Quote:
Originally Posted by brian View Post
I had a mustang that a buddy of mine and I built I had an issue with the bottom rad hose collapsing. A old school racer instructed me to run a spring thiingy on the hose.... never happened again. Just my experience.
That would be the negative pressure Rob was talking about. I guess the water pump was more efficient at pumping water than the radiator was at flowing it.

Professional
hasbeenracer is offline  
post #38 of 60 Old 06-09-2010, 04:42 PM
Old, Bold rider
 
robtharalson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Aurora, Colorado
Posts: 2,382
Rep Power: 1
 
Garage

Awards Showcase
Donation Veteran Community Leadership 
Total Awards: 3

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lemonhead View Post
Do we know what kind of psi this system gets to in an arizona summer?
Roughly 14.7 PSIG (101.4 KPa), or whatever the cap is rated at, regardless of the ambient temperature. Above that the foot valve lifts, dumps excess coolant into the header tank, and drops the pressure. When the temperature drops the coolant contracts and can create a low order vacuum in the system, at which time a secondary valve in the cap lifts and allows coolant from the header tank back into the system.

Rob

If it has already been done, it is safe to assume it is possible to do it.
On the other hand, if it has not been done never assume it is impossible to do it.
------- Rob --------
robtharalson is offline  
post #39 of 60 Old 06-09-2010, 06:47 PM
Le So Cal Troll
 
nd4spdbh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: So Cal
Posts: 5,766
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by robtharalson View Post
Roughly 14.7 PSIG (101.4 KPa), or whatever the cap is rated at, regardless of the ambient temperature. Above that the foot valve lifts, dumps excess coolant into the header tank, and drops the pressure. When the temperature drops the coolant contracts and can create a low order vacuum in the system, at which time a secondary valve in the cap lifts and allows coolant from the header tank back into the system.

Rob

16-20psi according to the service manual
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Untitled.jpg (49.8 KB, 15 views)

nd4spdbh is offline  
post #40 of 60 Old 06-09-2010, 06:49 PM
CG
 
catonsvilleguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Catonsville, MD
Posts: 593
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bucky View Post
it's for looks ONLY.

"yeah, even though the rider will lose an appendage from a flying piece of steel, he'll thank and love us at Honda more because he won't have to buy a new $25 radiator hose !" doesn't make sense. radiator hoses aren't exactly frequently pierced by rocks and road debris. there's rubber right behind the front tire, to and from the "heat exchanger" mount for the oil filter with no protection, and it's right in the line of fire.
Except antifreeze is all kinds of slippery AND toxic. The last place you want that stuff is slathered all over your back tire..........

catonsvilleguy is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Wrist Twisters forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome