Burnt out my starter relay - Wrist Twisters
 
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post #1 of 11 Old 05-24-2012, 05:06 PM Thread Starter
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Burnt out my starter relay

Burnt out my starter relay today. is this a common problem? could I have more damage tham just the relay



My thinking a wire may have come loose, friend noticed my tail light was flickering over the bumps

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post #2 of 11 Old 05-24-2012, 05:12 PM
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Never heard of this happening before, I'm going to have to check mine... Maybe it came loose over time and had a bad connection?

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post #3 of 11 Old 05-24-2012, 06:09 PM
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Not good. This is a common occurrence when high current draw combined with exposure to water (however little there may be under the seat) or high humidity conditions heat the connector pins and effectively bake out any dielectric grease that may have been there when the connections are made at the factory. The bare pins / sockets start to corrode, which will increase the heat, which will accelerate the corrosion, and so forth until the connection fails, usually taking the plastic connector body with it. This also happens in the rectifier / regulator connectors, both system power and three phase alternator inputs, and the ignition switch.

I'll start with prevention, then repair.

Prevention: dielectric grease, commonly available at auto supply stores for sealing ignition wires exposed to moisture, is specifically made for this. Just unplug the connector, clean it thoroughly, pack the socket it plugs into with the grease until it is nearly full, then plug it back in. The grease will make a big mess while extruding through the plug -- a good thing as it effectively flushes out any remaining debris and excludes air. No air, no moisture through condensation. When the plug is seated wipe away just enough grease to fit any boots, leaving as much grease as possible. Don't worry: the grease does not interfere in any way with a proper connection -- just make sure the plug actually seats and locks in place (the grease can make it hard to tell).

Repair: Any pin that has gotten hot enough to melt plastic has been annealed in the process (meaning insufficient spring action for a secure high current connection) and must be replaced. In this case unless you can find a replacement plug body that is exactly the same as yours, usually from a damaged main harness scrounged from a breaker, your best bet is either replace the entire main harness, or cut the wires at the plug body and crimp on uninsulated 1/4" quick disconnect terminals. Use uninsulated type so you can use heat shrink tubing to protect the crimp. The downside is the wires are no longer held in their respective positions, making an incorrect connection likely unless you take pictures and make notes to be sure. I have taken a picture, blown it up, and glued it to a nearby frame rail for use as a reference by anyone needing to work in that area. Do not try to commit it to memory! Oh, and dielectric grease is absolutely necessary now as the socket points up, insuring water retention. Use lots of it.

Good luck.

Rob

If it has already been done, it is safe to assume it is possible to do it.
On the other hand, if it has not been done never assume it is impossible to do it.
------- Rob --------
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post #4 of 11 Old 05-24-2012, 06:38 PM
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My '81 CB750F and '81 GoldWing needed their Hitachi connectors at the starter solenoid replaced due to the same occurrence.

Spares can be found here:

Hitachi Style Connectors

I also replaced the starter solenoid.

Make a diagram before you start!

Dielectric grease is a must!


Doc



"FRIENDS DON'T LET FRIENDS EARLY APEX."
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post #5 of 11 Old 05-24-2012, 06:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robtharalson
Not good. This is a common occurrence when high current draw combined with exposure to water (however little there may be under the seat) or high humidity conditions heat the connector pins and effectively bake out any dielectric grease that may have been there when the connections are made at the factory. The bare pins / sockets start to corrode, which will increase the heat, which will accelerate the corrosion, and so forth until the connection fails, usually taking the plastic connector body with it. This also happens in the rectifier / regulator connectors, both system power and three phase alternator inputs, and the ignition switch.

I'll start with prevention, then repair.

Prevention: dielectric grease, commonly available at auto supply stores for sealing ignition wires exposed to moisture, is specifically made for this. Just unplug the connector, clean it thoroughly, pack the socket it plugs into with the grease until it is nearly full, then plug it back in. The grease will make a big mess while extruding through the plug -- a good thing as it effectively flushes out any remaining debris and excludes air. No air, no moisture through condensation. When the plug is seated wipe away just enough grease to fit any boots, leaving as much grease as possible. Don't worry: the grease does not interfere in any way with a proper connection -- just make sure the plug actually seats and locks in place (the grease can make it hard to tell).

Repair: Any pin that has gotten hot enough to melt plastic has been annealed in the process (meaning insufficient spring action for a secure high current connection) and must be replaced. In this case unless you can find a replacement plug body that is exactly the same as yours, usually from a damaged main harness scrounged from a breaker, your best bet is either replace the entire main harness, or cut the wires at the plug body and crimp on uninsulated 1/4" quick disconnect terminals. Use uninsulated type so you can use heat shrink tubing to protect the crimp. The downside is the wires are no longer held in their respective positions, making an incorrect connection likely unless you take pictures and make notes to be sure. I have taken a picture, blown it up, and glued it to a nearby frame rail for use as a reference by anyone needing to work in that area. Do not try to commit it to memory! Oh, and dielectric grease is absolutely necessary now as the socket points up, insuring water retention. Use lots of it.

Good luck.

Rob
Am I the only one here that wants to have a beer with Rob just to listen to whatever he wants to talk about? I seriously see a wall of text and for half a second I almost go the "tl;dr" route. Then I see it's from Rob and instead read the entire thing and commit it to memory.

I think I might have a minor man crush on Robs brain...

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post #6 of 11 Old 05-24-2012, 08:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2002-919 View Post
I think I might have a minor man crush on Robs brain...
+1, sorry g00gl3it

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post #7 of 11 Old 05-25-2012, 12:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pvster

+1, sorry g00gl3it
It's not my brain you have a man crush on, Pvster lol....



...it's my bike. HaHa!

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post #8 of 11 Old 05-25-2012, 03:41 AM Thread Starter
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thanks for the help

Current
2006 Honda CB900F 919 Hornet
Sold
1996 Suzuki GSF750 Kan.of.tuna
1985 Honda VF700 Intercepter
1997 Suzuki DR650
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post #9 of 11 Old 05-25-2012, 03:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by g00gl3it View Post
It's not my brain you have a man crush on, Pvster lol....



...it's my bike. HaHa!
not even close!
just the ohlins bit

however, the 599 on the other hand is pretty sweet i must admit. at least it's in the right color! now if i could actually ride it instead of just staring at it in my garage....

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post #10 of 11 Old 05-28-2012, 08:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2002-919 View Post
Am I the only one here that wants to have a beer with Rob just to listen to whatever he wants to talk about? I seriously see a wall of text and for half a second I almost go the "tl;dr" route. Then I see it's from Rob and instead read the entire thing and commit it to memory.

I think I might have a minor man crush on Robs brain...

I've been lucky enough to have Rob hangout at my shop on several occasions as well as ride with him. The guy is a true renaissance man. His knowledge about.....well, EVERYTHING, is simply amazing!
To have Rob share his epic adventures about life, motorcycles, racing, mechanics, engineering, mathematics, fabrication and general problem solving is mind blowing. He definitely thinks outside the box. There's been times when he's hung out all day, and it seems like only twenty minutes!
If you ever get the chance to ride with Rob, you'd better be fast because the guy hauls ass....only it doesn't look like he's going fast because he's so damned smooth. (I looked up the word "smooth" in the dictionary once and it said; See Rob Tharalson....true story!)
If you're ever lucky enough to have Rob stop by your place, make sure you have some Pepsi or 7-Up in the fridge.
Rob is the real deal.

Professional
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post #11 of 11 Old 06-01-2012, 03:33 PM Thread Starter
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She is alive!! No other damage to the electrical system. Yes! Thank you ebay $16.95. OEM at the local honda dealer was $93.99.

Sent from my Kindle Fire using Tapatalk 2

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