A little maintenance tip. - Wrist Twisters
 
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post #1 of 24 Old 08-30-2007, 05:51 PM Thread Starter
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A little maintenance tip.

I usually lube my chain once a week, (I commute every day on the bike & ride the weekends) depending on the miles ridden, sometimes maybe two weeks.
Lately I have been lazy on the upkeep.
Today I noticed my bike slipping during left hand turns. Just a little bit.
Enough to warrant a “What the hell?” thought.
When I arrived home I checked the rear tire & found a small film of grease, sort of a dot that was smudged.
I looked at the drive sprocket cover to see some oil drips underneath.
Upon pulling the cover I found it full of oily grease from chain lube.
Because it’s been hot, the lube was liquefying & dripping in front of the tire.
See what lazy will get you. A mess.
So, my suggestion is to check your drive sprocket cover for build up of lube once in a while.

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post #2 of 24 Old 08-30-2007, 06:37 PM
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How often do you clean the chain? and what do you use for the job?

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post #3 of 24 Old 08-30-2007, 07:03 PM Thread Starter
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I actually wipe it down when the chain is hot & re lube it. When the lube thickens up, I wipe off the excess. I have never actually "cleaned" the chain. It always looks "clean".
Heres a pic of about 2000 miles since new,6 applications of lube,Just home from work. I haven't touched it.
I only adjusted it once since I put it on.
Attachment 4052

I did wipe the side of sprocket though.
Attachment 4053

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post #4 of 24 Old 08-30-2007, 07:09 PM
 
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I use Honda Brake and Contact cleaner every other time to remove old lube, dirt, and what ever else may have found it's way onto my chain.

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post #5 of 24 Old 08-30-2007, 07:12 PM Thread Starter
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When it does come time to really scrub it clean. I'll pull the swing arm & put it in the solvent tank & blow it out. Then relube it by hand & reinstall it. Thats how I do my Off Road bike's chain,except it has a clipped master.
No swing arm removal.
The swing arm is so easy to pull on this bike,why bother doing it on the bike!

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post #6 of 24 Old 08-30-2007, 09:39 PM
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By using solvent or brake cleaner you guys are disolving the lube insuide the rollers that the o-rings protect. You won't be able to re-lube inside there. Just using a rag with cleaner on it and rubbing the visible portion of the chain is the safest method to a long chain life.

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post #7 of 24 Old 08-30-2007, 10:19 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by royalchoppers View Post
By using solvent or brake cleaner you guys are disolving the lube insuide the rollers that the o-rings protect. You won't be able to re-lube inside there. Just using a rag with cleaner on it and rubbing the visible portion of the chain is the safest method to a long chain life.
Sorry. I disagree.
Brake cleaner my dry the regular(cheaper) rubber "O" rings, But the new(higher end chain) "X" & "O" rings are made of a tougher material.
There is no way your going to get solvent past those "O"rings or "X" rings. It is simply just way to tight of a seal.
If simply brushing solvent over a chain dissolves the grease behind the "O"rings than the "O"ring idea would be a total wast of time.
I have been using "Safety Clean" solvent for years, & on my present chain for Three years.
Every time I come back from Off-Roading(12 times a year min.)I clean the chain this way.
I have never had any indication of grease removal,dryness,or excessive stretching. As a matter of fact, it still feels like new.
I make sure I blow out the rollers & hand roll each roller as I re lube it.

I can understand a non-"O" ring chain. but not an "O" ring one.

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post #8 of 24 Old 08-31-2007, 09:44 AM
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xrmikey, good tip. I've found the same thing. When I replace my chain, clean it, or just want to "deep clean" the swing arm and undercarriage, I always pull the counter sprocket cover and find whatever lube I've been using in there. I tumbled to the fact that it collects there when I changed oil one day and thought I had an oil leak just aft of the drain plug. Come to find out it was the 90 wt gear oil I had been lubing the chain with, that had filled the sprocket cover and had found it's way to the underside of my engine. I clean it more regularly now.

Thanks.

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post #9 of 24 Old 08-31-2007, 11:01 AM
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xrmikey, you really have that much faith in a chain's seal? morton thiokol couldn't build a decent sealing ring with millions of dollars, but you don't think a little brake clean can get past the .00002cent individual tiny seals in a chain? even when you put 80psi of air behind it? maybe there's no downside to your method (and remember, evidence from one person is merely anecdotal and not scientific) but i do believe that your solvent is making it past the seals. besides, the metal surfaces of a chain move around a heck of a lot in relationship to each other: i don't think the seals can reliably bridge the gap between two metal surfaces with such drastically changing juxtapositioning. if no solvent can get past the orings as you posit, then no dirt could have gotten in there in the first place and there's no point to using solvent, right? why try to clean whatever's behind an impermeable barrier?
they call me, "Devil's Advocate". (and douchebag, from time to time)

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post #10 of 24 Old 08-31-2007, 11:45 AM
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I've noticed in the Honda manual recommends cleaning the chain with a hi flash point solvent like Kerosene. I used Kerosene on the stock 919 chain (O ring) for the first 2 years, and that chain rusted and ceased up at the pins after i did one long rain ride. Turns out the O ring grease had been dissolved and I suspect it had been that way for a while and didn’t present until I got the chain wet in the rain. I replaced that chain with a D.I.D. X ring and I only clean and lube that one with WD-40 and a rag. Note i also clean the sprockets when i clean the chain. Going on 3 years and I’ve only adjusted once (that include flogging the crap out of it at a few trackdays too) and that was a very small adjustment. Granted I don’t ride much in the rain; however I’ve been caught in it a few times as it’s almost impossible to avoid out here. So far this chain seems to be doing quite well.

I suspect that the new chains don't really require Lube for the roller & pins with the better seals and such, IMO the importance of lube now is for the chain and sprocket contact points.

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post #11 of 24 Old 08-31-2007, 01:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xrmikey View Post
. . .Upon pulling the cover I found it full of oily grease from chain lube.
Because it’s been hot, the lube was liquefying & dripping in front of the tire.
See what lazy will get you. A mess.
So, my suggestion is to check your drive sprocket cover for build up of lube once in a while.
Just leave off the cover, ala Joe Racer, for those quick gear changes. I do, though not for the gear changes. I like the racer look. And, having it off allows me to clean the sprocket area after each ride. The 9er will get the same look.

My CBR600RR


My CRF250X Streetard

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post #12 of 24 Old 08-31-2007, 01:49 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bucky View Post
xrmikey, you really have that much faith in a chain's seal? morton thiokol couldn't build a decent sealing ring with millions of dollars, but you don't think a little brake clean can get past the .00002cent individual tiny seals in a chain? even when you put 80psi of air behind it? maybe there's no downside to your method (and remember, evidence from one person is merely anecdotal and not scientific) but i do believe that your solvent is making it past the seals. besides, the metal surfaces of a chain move around a heck of a lot in relationship to each other: i don't think the seals can reliably bridge the gap between two metal surfaces with such drastically changing juxtapositioning. if no solvent can get past the orings as you posit, then no dirt could have gotten in there in the first place and there's no point to using solvent, right? why try to clean whatever's behind an impermeable barrier?
they call me, "Devil's Advocate". (and douchebag, from time to time)
I am that faithful due to experence & all I clean is the area around the seals not behind them. Where the sprockets ride & roller area.
I also don't blow air at the seal area but at the roller area only.

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post #13 of 24 Old 08-31-2007, 01:52 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 9nineteen View Post
Just leave off the cover, ala Joe Racer, for those quick gear changes. I do, though not for the gear changes. I like the racer look. And, having it off allows me to clean the sprocket area after each ride. The 9er will get the same look.

My CBR600RR


My CRF250X Streetard
My off-road bike has the cover removed. But the 919 stays covered.
Too messy.

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post #14 of 24 Old 08-31-2007, 06:03 PM
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because of my 8" over swingarm, i have to run significant play in my chain. turns out, i let it get a little bit TOO significant. one time this year, doing a rolling burnout for my adoring fans (ah-hem) on the return road at the strip, attempting said burnout derailed my chain and broke my front sprocket cover. it also cracked the engine case where one of the 3 sprocket cover bolts attaches. luckily for me, it didn't split the case enough to cause an oil leak, so i run the barenaked sprocket look on The Tinman too. "Simplicate and add lightness"! Wm. Stout.

"just watch yer toes"! Bucky
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post #15 of 24 Old 08-31-2007, 06:18 PM
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The bike looks sexy bucky.

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post #16 of 24 Old 08-31-2007, 06:30 PM
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That's a meat grinder

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post #17 of 24 Old 09-02-2007, 08:42 PM
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I have been using Honda chain lube (HP Chain Lube w/ white graphite) and it's made a greasy mess of my bike too. I took off the front spocket cover today and cleaned it out, so what's next for me to try that won't be so messy? Can I use a 75-90w gear oil, I've looked a couple places and haven't found just 90w. I'm not a big WD-40 fan, works fine for desk fans and IV poles, but not sure about my chain? (forgive the ignorance, i haven't had to worry bout chains for the last 7 years, thats the ONE good thing about a Harley-the only thing)

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post #18 of 24 Old 09-02-2007, 09:15 PM Thread Starter
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Maxima Chain wax is one of the best for non fling. I just haven't been all that fond of it's lubrication properties.
All spray lubes will build up.
Oil will just plain fling off immediately due to lack of cling ability.
Oil lubes well & generally won't build up much but requires more applications.
As with all lubes, watch for over lubing.
I use PJ1 Blue Label (clear) One of the best spray lubes I have used with minimal fling off.
One to two chain revolutions is all it needs. Making sure to wipe off any excess immediately.

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post #19 of 24 Old 09-03-2007, 07:24 AM
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Mikey, you said you just wipe the chain thoroghly while it's hot ? Your chain looks cleaner than mine after having taken it to the shop for a tire, chain cleaning and oil change. I gotta get me some tools. I'm getting quickly wary of my shop.

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post #20 of 24 Old 09-03-2007, 07:37 AM
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I'm generally okay with something i may have to use more frequently, if it protects well and has low build up, what kinda oil lubes are we talking about?

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post #21 of 24 Old 09-03-2007, 08:09 AM Thread Starter
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If you are going to use an oil instead of a spray lube. Then a 10w-40 would be fine.
I would recommend staying with the spray lubes & maybe try the Maxima "Chain Wax" first.

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post #22 of 24 Old 09-03-2007, 09:43 AM
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A quote from the box my RK530XSO chain came in (spelling, grammar, punctuation and all!):

"CLEANING: For street applications you should clean chain every 300 miles with mineral oil based cleaner to keep the excess road dirt and grit from building up between link plates and roller surfaces. When cleaning, be sure not to damage the special rubber RX-Rings by using a coarse brush or caustic solvent. Avoid steam cleaning or other hi-pressure water or solvent systems that might penetrate past the sealed RX-Rings and contaminate or wash away the lubrication inside the critical internal bearing surfaces.

LUBRICATION: All RK RX-Ring motorcycle chains come pre-lubricated from the factory with our original grease special injected into the internal bearing surfaces. Keeping the chain clean and generously lubricated with a petrolatum based SAE 80-90 oil or suitable O-ring lube will insure the long life and performance of the special RX-Rings and the Chain. We recommend RK O-Ring Chain Lube.

WARNING: Many aerosol lubricants contain corrosive solvent/detergents in their carrying agents which are harmful to RX-Rings and the environment."

I ride 120 miles round trip each work day. I only ride a little bit around town on the weekends. I've started cleaning and adjusting my chain each Saturday and Wednesday. I use the methods Mike proposed on an earlier thread of pouring 90 wt gear oil on a rag and while holding the oil pool on the rag around the chain, rotating the tire till the intire chain has rotated through the rag 3-4 times. This cleans and oils the chain. I go one step further and drop 90 wt gear oil on the chain, sparingly, on the side plates and center rollers while spinning the wheel with my hand. A little 90 wt gear oil is thrown on my wheel but comes off easily when I give the bike a bath. I'm thinking of adding something like the "Grunge Brush" to the mix also.

It looks like RK doesn't want me to soak my chain in mineral spirits or use WD-40 anymore.

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post #23 of 24 Old 09-03-2007, 12:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xrmikey View Post
If you are going to use an oil instead of a spray lube. Then a 10w-40 would be fine.
I would recommend staying with the spray lubes & maybe try the Maxima "Chain Wax" first.
Maxima "Chain Wax" is good stuff. I've been using it for years. Just make certain your chain is a bit warm. Easy enough done by riding a bit.

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post #24 of 24 Old 09-03-2007, 03:32 PM
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Oiler

My Loobman oiler is on the way from England. The Co. is very nice and Proffessional.

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