919 shock quest, yet again - Wrist Twisters
 
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post #1 of 10 Old 02-06-2010, 08:18 AM Thread Starter
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919 shock quest, yet again

It all started with me calling Ohlins USA. Long story short I found out there is a local NJ Ohlins authorized service and sales guy 10 min from my house Next thing you know I am in his shop bothering this poor guy with all kind of questions. Jim was nice enough to take the time from his busy schedule and spend almost 1.5 hours with me just shooting chit.
I brought my 07 919 shock with me so I could finally to test the spring and it turned out to be very close to stock HO201 ohlins 1093-74 spring. I can't find the paper I written down the exact number but it was a little more that 1000lbs. Due to it being progressive, it started up very soft and then settled at about 1020lbs. He also checked the stock shock and told me that shocks rebound is too soft/weak for 1000lbs spring. It can't control spring's force on the rebound and spring rebounds too rapidly hence that pogo stick feeling the most of us has experienced.
After taking the shock apart, Jim said that he can make it work for what I do with the 919. It will be re-valved, new fluid with proper nitrogen pressure in the bladder and new Ohlins linear spring for my weight.

I guess we will se how it turns out. Yes, I thought about "polishing the turd" concept. But after comparing stock internals and Ohlins and taking in consideration the price, I think it's worth a shot.
He also has Ohlins for 919, $908. There are better deals for HO201s Ohlins online but having somebody local, who can set it up just for your bike with you on it, priceless. Jim is also going to help me with my DIY fork re-valving project, free of charge, my hands his brains

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post #2 of 10 Old 02-06-2010, 08:47 AM
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sweet! i just got mine in the other day. got it from the local race shop for $889

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post #3 of 10 Old 02-06-2010, 08:50 AM
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Guys named Jim are like that. Patient and extremely smart.


Let us know how your journey progresses.

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post #4 of 10 Old 02-06-2010, 11:06 AM
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Sometimes polished turds look alright. Anyone who watches Mythbusters knows that. So Jim is re-working your OEM shock and putting an Ohlins spring on it? Or am I mis-understanding? I always thought the '02-'03 had the 1000lbs spring and the newer had about a 920lbs spring. I am changing my '02 shock for an '05 once the weather warms up.

Spoiler:

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post #5 of 10 Old 02-06-2010, 01:03 PM
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The later suspenders were improved - adjustable front and rear.

Out of interest what is the cost of the turd-rehash? I'm thinking it may not be far off the $900 spanking new Ohlins.

Out of interest a rear Ohlins for the Hornet in New Zealand will cost me in the region of $2k!

Consequently I'm running my stock shock ........

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post #6 of 10 Old 02-06-2010, 01:34 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rickard919 View Post
So Jim is re-working your OEM shock and putting an Ohlins spring on it? Or am I mis-understanding?
yes, you didn't misunderstand it.

As far as 919 oem springs go: we measure 07 spring and it was like at 1020lbs but it is progressive so rate changes as it goes through the stroke. I can't find where I wrote the exact number down. I also have 03 spring but it is still on the bike. I will ask him to measure both of them again once I take off the 03 shock. According to Ohlins, 1028 lbs spring (part# 1093-74) is for ~200lbs rider. So unless you are close to 200lbs, stock 919 spring is way to stiff for you. But like I said before, stock 919 shock is too soft for this spring. So if you are 160-170lbs, I would just change the spring and see if you can get the rebound right with stock shock valving. If it still pogos on the rebound, then rework it.

Price is far away from $900. The only expensive part is ~$90 Ohlins spring. I will give you total once it's all set and done

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post #7 of 10 Old 02-07-2010, 06:40 AM
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That poor 919..... Early on, it got the crummy title of "Budget Bike". Now a reworked rear shock, that will likely be a very nice improvement, is given the title of "polished Turd".

Zaq, I applaude you for being a foreward thinker and giving a reworked 04+ rear shock a try. A long time ago, I bought a used Ohlins off of a guy, or I'd have at least tried a different spring on my 04. It was a common practice of Gen 1 FZ1 owners to respring their rear shock. I've ridden a a friend's stock FZ1, then ridden an FZ that had been resprung. The resprung bike rode much nicer. It was still an FZ1. You weren't going to go out and give R1s a bloody nose with it, but it was a lot more pleasant to ride.

I've been th Putnam 4 or 5 times now. I usually go in the spring. I usually do the NESBA "Clinic". They bring in a guy to adjust your bike for you. Doesn't cost you any extra. He liked 919s, BTW. He didn't adjust anyone's race gas cap, or pizzazy levers, or brake line holder, or any other useless crap. He adjusted suspentions. He did mine some good. A compliant suspention is where it's at if you really want to enjoy RIDING your motorcycle.

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post #8 of 10 Old 02-07-2010, 08:11 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sniper View Post
That poor 919..... Early on, it got the crummy title of "Budget Bike". Now a reworked rear shock, that will likely be a very nice improvement, is given the title of "polished Turd".




Sniper, I'm with you on this one, the suspension is where it all is on the bike.
Speaking of suspension: people usually miss very important part of suspension-tires.
Any 919 out there was designed from the factory to handle ok and be safe for riders from 120lbs to 2up 380lbs. we are talking 260lbs difference there. I'm not even getting into differences in the terrain, being it autobahn or some gravel road, or even track
I think it is pretty obvious that adjusting suspension/tires for your own weight/riding condition will make a huge difference.

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post #9 of 10 Old 03-04-2010, 01:42 AM
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so im 165 with my gear on i have an 02 919 should i be riding the rear shock as soft as it will go with that little notch thing on top of the spring? how did you like the new shock was it worth it and how much was it?

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post #10 of 10 Old 03-04-2010, 04:13 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cotten Mouth Chris View Post
so im 165 with my gear on i have an 02 919 should i be riding the rear shock as soft as it will go with that little notch thing on top of the spring? how did you like the new shock was it worth it and how much was it?
my shock is built but Ohlins spring is on backorder and we still have snow on the ground, so no testing for me yet. You are asking about preload. It all depends on what numbers you are getting for the sag.

Here is what you need to do,
#1 - find someone to help you:

front rider sag:
lift up you bike by the triple ( hang it by the frame from garage roof rafters etc) so your front wheel is hanging free in the air with forks fully extended. Measure (use mm) from the axle to some point on the lower triple. Call this measurement L1
sit on the bike in full gear in your usual riding position with your feet slightly touching the ground as not to transfer your weight to your feet but just keep you bike from falling. Ask your helper to gently lift up your handlebars and slowly let them settle. Measure again at the same spot as before, call it L2
Have him gently push down on the front of the bike, and let it slowly rise up. Measure once more for L3

Sag = L1 – (L2 + L3)/2 Magic numbers here are 30-35mm for the street
If your measurements fall out of range, adjust your preload: stiffer (clockwise) for less sag, softer (counter-clockwise) for more sag. If you have no fork preload adjustability (02-03 919) you can take your for cap off and use lots of washers between the spacer and a retainer washer until you get right numbers. Than cut your spring spacer to the lengh of your existing spacer + washers you used (PITA method)

front free sag:
•Take the measurements the same as for rider sag, but measure L2 and L3 with no rider on the bike. Should be around 15-20mm

rear rider sag:

Measure the distance from the axle directly up to a solid point on your bike’s subframe or bodywork. Call this measurement L1.
Sit on the bike in full gear, in your usual riding position.
Ask your friend gently lift up the rear of the bike and lets it slowly settle on its suspension. Measure again. Call this measurement L2.
Gently push down on the rear of the bike, and let it slowly rise up. Measure once more for L3.
Sag = L1 – (L2 + L3)/2

Rear sag should be 30-35mm for street riding

If L3-L2 is more than 25mm for the front end, or more than 5mm for the rear end, there is too much friction. Investigate.

If your measurement fall out of range, adjust your preload: stiffer for less sag, softer for more sag.

rear free sag is measured the same as rider sag just without rider: 5-10mm is the number here

To recap the above:

SPRING RATE - Spring Rate OK - Both free and rider sag within acceptable range. Spring Rate too soft - Rider Sag OK, but too little or no Free Sag Spring Rate too firm - Rider Sag OK, but too much Free Sag

SAG - Front - Rider Sag - 30-35mm (25-30% of Full Travel) Free Sag - 15-20mm (60-70% of Rider Sag) Rear - Rider Sag - 20-30mm (race), 30-35mm (street) (25-30% of Full Travel) Free Sag - 5-10mm (extremely light bikes use less) (15-25% of Rider Sag)


Just to give you an idea, the procces should look kind of like this:

YouTube - Honda 2008 CBR1000RR Stock Suspension Evaluation

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