Older Bike? - Wrist Twisters
 
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post #1 of 17 Old 07-13-2006, 11:27 AM
LouDuB
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Cool Older Bike?

Do any of you guys know of any sites that will help me get a steering damper for my 1989 ZX7?Please help,in need of some stabilisation.

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post #2 of 17 Old 07-13-2006, 11:31 AM
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Could it be a problem that could be fixed without a damper? I only ask because a damper will only cover up a problem. Are your forks tweaked, or what kind of problem are you having?

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post #3 of 17 Old 07-13-2006, 12:01 PM
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Have you checked eBay?
Do you have any local bike wreckers in your area?

Lookie what I found!
http://www.streetandcomp.com/pdfapps..._ZX7_89-90.PDF

Google is your friend!

http://www.motosites.com/Motorcycle_Salvage_Yards/

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post #4 of 17 Old 07-13-2006, 01:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 600RidgeRunner
Could it be a problem that could be fixed without a damper? I only ask because a damper will only cover up a problem. Are your forks tweaked, or what kind of problem are you having?
No,my forks are perfectly striaght,It happens when I am coming out of a turn and I get on the throttle pretty hard,The front wheel starts coming off the ground and it starts getting that shake.This is the only time it happens.

post #5 of 17 Old 07-13-2006, 01:16 PM
 
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Someone check her temp. she is being helpful and nice today... I heard anal ones are the most accurate.

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post #6 of 17 Old 07-13-2006, 01:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SportyChick
Have you checked eBay?
Do you have any local bike wreckers in your area?

Lookie what I found!
http://www.streetandcomp.com/pdfapps..._ZX7_89-90.PDF

Google is your friend!

http://www.motosites.com/Motorcycle_Salvage_Yards/
I am going to check Ebay and I have asked the local dealers and salvage dealers and they have not a clue.Thanks for both trying to help.

post #7 of 17 Old 07-13-2006, 01:32 PM
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SportyChick,you are a godess,I am going to look through there right now.I sure do appreciate the help guys and gals.Please be safe out there when riding.

post #8 of 17 Old 07-13-2006, 02:22 PM
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Yeah, it sounds like you are having the typical "light-front-end-as-you-are-hard-on-the-throttle-while-exiting-a-turn" syndrome. A damper does sound like the cure, I would recommend a little weight shift along with daily damper use. The combination of these two should cure your machine of most of these problems. Glad you found what you were searching for.

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post #9 of 17 Old 07-13-2006, 03:03 PM
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Yeah,it just makes me get puckerbutt when I am trying to concentrate on the task at hand.I am still having a hard time finding one though.I am hoping that one from a newer bike will work with no problems,just waiting for Email responses,Thanks again guys.

post #10 of 17 Old 07-14-2006, 01:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LouDuB
No,my forks are perfectly striaght,It happens when I am coming out of a turn and I get on the throttle pretty hard,The front wheel starts coming off the ground and it starts getting that shake.This is the only time it happens.
Does the bike come off the ground a lot and does it shake a lot?

Reason why I'm asking is my track F4i does the same and has no damper but it's not a bad shake and doesn't come off the ground much. I take it and use that as "feedback" from the bike. By no means am I saying that my bike would never go into a tank slapper (although I've yet to see or hear an F4i do that), just wondering how extreme your shakes are.

Quote:
Originally Posted by turn_1
Someone check her temp. she is being helpful and nice today... I heard anal ones are the most accurate.
I heard that too about the anal ones..........

I can be kind-hearted and thoughtful sometimes you big poophead!

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post #11 of 17 Old 07-14-2006, 03:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LouDuB
SportyChick,you are a godess,I am going to look through there right now.I sure do appreciate the help guys and gals.Please be safe out there when riding.

Hmmmm.... think he might survive Sporty afterall.

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post #12 of 17 Old 07-14-2006, 03:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 600RidgeRunner
Yeah, it sounds like you are having the typical "light-front-end-as-you-are-hard-on-the-throttle-while-exiting-a-turn" syndrome. A damper does sound like the cure, I would recommend a little weight shift along with daily damper use. The combination of these two should cure your machine of most of these problems. Glad you found what you were searching for.

I was just thinking along the lines with James here.

The ZX7 were one of the first homolgamation bikes - kinda the race on Sunday, sell on Monday type deals. They had aggressive seating and a lot front weight bias. I had one in England. In the event you don't find a damper for it, I would say check things like the suspension setting and height. Your bike might be squatting out of the corners.

Has it always done this ? If not, then go back to any recent changes like tires for instance. A smaller diameter tire will lower your rear and could be enough to unload the front under hard acceleration.

If on the other hand it has always done this - if you bought it new, then have you ever set the suspension to yourself - wieght, riding, etc. If you bought it used, was it set up for someone lighter ? Are all the suspension bits stock?

If you do find a damper and install, but it was not the cause of your initial concern, then other symptons may appear like front end tuck into turns, or understeer out of tires with front end slide...... I doubt these though.

Just some thoughts.

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post #13 of 17 Old 07-15-2006, 05:34 AM
 
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Maybe check to see how old the suspension is, suspension benefits from rebuilds

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post #14 of 17 Old 07-23-2006, 10:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SportyChick
Does the bike come off the ground a lot and does it shake a lot?

Reason why I'm asking is my track F4i does the same and has no damper but it's not a bad shake and doesn't come off the ground much. I take it and use that as "feedback" from the bike. By no means am I saying that my bike would never go into a tank slapper (although I've yet to see or hear an F4i do that), just wondering how extreme your shakes are.



I heard that too about the anal ones..........

I can be kind-hearted and thoughtful sometimes you big poophead!
If I rip the throttle hard,it comes off the ground and than does it just about every time.It usually isn't too bad.

post #15 of 17 Old 07-23-2006, 10:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WIM-RC51
I was just thinking along the lines with James here.

The ZX7 were one of the first homolgamation bikes - kinda the race on Sunday, sell on Monday type deals. They had aggressive seating and a lot front weight bias. I had one in England. In the event you don't find a damper for it, I would say check things like the suspension setting and height. Your bike might be squatting out of the corners.

Has it always done this ? If not, then go back to any recent changes like tires for instance. A smaller diameter tire will lower your rear and could be enough to unload the front under hard acceleration.

If on the other hand it has always done this - if you bought it new, then have you ever set the suspension to yourself - wieght, riding, etc. If you bought it used, was it set up for someone lighter ? Are all the suspension bits stock?

If you do find a damper and install, but it was not the cause of your initial concern, then other symptons may appear like front end tuck into turns, or understeer out of tires with front end slide...... I doubt these though.

Just some thoughts.
It didn't do this when I first got it because I was taking it easy getting used to it,but since than,I have been getting more comfortable with it and since than have had the suspension redone.It is set up pretty good and does really well in the corners.It just does it when I get on the throttle really hard,when the wheel comes off the ground.I guess that if I can't find a damper for it I will have to learn better throttle control.I need to learn it anyway.I sure do appreciate the feedback you guys and gals have been giving me,Thanks.

post #16 of 17 Old 07-23-2006, 10:12 PM
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Scotts and GPX dampers fit just about any bike... did you look into those?

'02 RC-51
'10 Unicycle

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post #17 of 17 Old 03-26-2007, 10:50 PM
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Traction control is the hallmark of every champion -- to have the confidence to be able to hold both tires on the hairy edge of disaster whenever necessary, and back away from the edge to save tires for the all important last few laps when your competitors have let their enthusiasm overcome their vision of the next lap, and the checkered flag. Remember the words of Mike Hailwood: "At all times, I go slow enough to win."

Congratulations. You are at the door to the next level of understanding the rider / machine interface. What you do now will decide whether you open that door or not. Either say "The bike is not right yet -- all it needs is..." and the door stays closed. Say "The bike felt like this when I do this," or "Just before this happened, the bike felt like..." and the door opens a crack. Machine setup becomes secondary to your setup, your feeling the messages the motorcycle is constantly sending. There are many riders who have mastered this machine language. To me, Calvin Lee Rayborn was the best example: on an underpowered, overstressed, underbraked, marginal handling Harley Davidson road racer he was able to so thoroughly embarrass the best riders Europe had to offer on the epitome of motorcycle technology of the era, to the point of having Jarno Saarinen comment to him "How do you go so quickly on that ... thing?" He understood that it is not machine and rider; it is an interactive unit constantly communicating. I've seen movies of him entering a corner by barely starting to lean, then steering into the corner, sliding the front tire to scrub off speed right down to the apex, shifting his weight at just the right instant to change the traction dynamic while throttling up and sliding the rear just enough to balance turning with accelerating, and exiting while looking at the exit of the next corner and the bike in front of him. With all the outward drama of a Gold Wing cruising through Arizona at 73 miles per hour with Tales of Topographic Oceans cranked up on the stereo. (A killer combination, by the way!) Jaw dropping to watch. And revealing. It is possible to learn this. All it takes is the will to do so.

Soon, when the front end starts to do its shuck and jive, you will shift your weight just right while slightly dragging the rear brake to modulate power delivery and step out the rear just enough to make it a non event.

I envy you: I'm near the top of my personal learning curve, which I flatter myself to think of as fairly lofty, but you are presented with an opportunity I could not take advantage of: the Rayborn / Hailwood / Roberts / Whoever level. Whether you know it or not, you already understand this. Open that door.

Rob

If it has already been done, it is safe to assume it is possible to do it.
On the other hand, if it has not been done never assume it is impossible to do it.
------- Rob --------
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