known "issues" w/Honda CBR 954RR? - Wrist Twisters
 1Likes
  • 1 Post By Bigdaa
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 40 Old 04-22-2012, 10:35 AM Thread Starter
Boilermaker in B-town
 
stamperman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Bloomington
Posts: 247
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Veteran 
Total Awards: 1

known "issues" w/Honda CBR 954RR?

I'm helping my son buy his first motorcycle.
He's interested in a 2002 Honda CBR 954RR. I'm not very familiar with this model (I ride a 919). Are there any known "trouble spots or issues" for this model machine?
My overall experience with Honda's is that usually design issues are small and can be dealt with.
But, without asking, who's to know?
Tell me what you think I should be evaluating with a critical eye on this bike....


"First You Fly, Then You Die!"--Los Lobos
stamperman is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 40 Old 04-22-2012, 10:47 AM
The Cripple
 
Pvster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 8,743
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stamperman View Post
I'm helping my son buy his first motorcycle.
He's interested in a 2002 Honda CBR 954RR. I'm not very familiar with this model (I ride a 919). Are there any known "trouble spots or issues" for this model machine?
My overall experience with Honda's is that usually design issues are small and can be dealt with.
But, without asking, who's to know?
Tell me what you think I should be evaluating with a critical eye on this bike....
first off, great project!

second off, you say this is your son's first motorcycle? may i suggest you guys look at a smaller bike for a first bike?

Pvster is offline  
post #3 of 40 Old 04-22-2012, 10:53 AM
Tirone
 
Green Fox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Kenosha
Posts: 26
Rep Power: 1
 
Brother had one really nice bike. It was his first bike. No issues with it. For a first bike I hope he takes it slow they are pretty quick.

Green Fox is offline  
 
post #4 of 40 Old 04-22-2012, 11:43 AM
Le So Cal Troll
 
nd4spdbh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: So Cal
Posts: 5,766
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pvster View Post
first off, great project!

second off, you say this is your son's first motorcycle? may i suggest you guys look at a smaller bike for a first bike?
+1 maybe an sv650

nd4spdbh is offline  
post #5 of 40 Old 04-22-2012, 11:48 AM Thread Starter
Boilermaker in B-town
 
stamperman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Bloomington
Posts: 247
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Veteran 
Total Awards: 1

Pvster, you may suggest a smaller bike, but it would probably fall on my son's deaf ears
He's the most level headed guy his age I know. Not much if any squid in him. Otherwise, I'd alarmed, as you're suggesting.
I personally feel larger bikes are easier to ride, but that's just me.


"First You Fly, Then You Die!"--Los Lobos
stamperman is offline  
post #6 of 40 Old 04-22-2012, 12:12 PM
duc duc GOOSE!
 
HondaCrazy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: PA
Posts: 946
Rep Power: 1
 
u know your son better than anyone, but there is a lot of throttle in that 954, not as forgiving as a 919, or a ninja 500, or an sv650 as suggested.

other than that, they are sweet bikes! and they are honda's, nough said.

14 Ducati Monster 1200, termi's
07 VFR Anniversary Edition-SOLD
02 919-SOLD
01 CBR F4i-SOLD
02 CBR F4i-SOLD
92 Kawi EX 500-SOLD
HondaCrazy is offline  
post #7 of 40 Old 04-22-2012, 12:42 PM
The Cripple
 
Pvster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 8,743
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stamperman View Post
Pvster, you may suggest a smaller bike, but it would probably fall on my son's deaf ears
He's the most level headed guy his age I know. Not much if any squid in him. Otherwise, I'd alarmed, as you're suggesting.
I personally feel larger bikes are easier to ride, but that's just me.
while i respect your position, i must point out that any bike bigger than 600cc is going to be "too much" for ANY new rider, regardless of age or maturity. the fact of the matter is, he does not have the experience to handle that kind of power to weight ratio, let alone the experience needed to handle getting out of a situation with that size of a bike. 600cc is plenty as it is to get yourself in trouble as a new rider. i know because my 2nd bike (after a LONG stretch from the 1st bike) was a 600 cc vtwin and i got into tons of trouble lol.

i can tell you right now, no one "outgrows" a ninja 250, and anyone who says otherwise clearly thinks they need "better equipment" to be a "better rider" and are clueless.

the fact that suggesting a smaller cc bike "falling on deaf ears" screams squid, and lack of a level head to me personally. that 954 has got not only weight, but that oooomph that is pretty addicting, very sporty rider position, and high center of gravity thrown into the bag of "novice rider" and is asking for trouble.

nonetheless, i wish you both the best of luck and hope you encourage him to at least take a rider safety course.

oh, and pix of the build, you know better

Pvster is offline  
post #8 of 40 Old 04-22-2012, 01:01 PM
Discen
 
carotman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Montreal South Shore, Qc, Canada
Posts: 286
Rep Power: 1
 
The fun thing with a powerful bike is that when you want less power, you just go easy on the throttle. With a small bike, you can't turn the throttle past the stop screw to get more power.

carotman is offline  
post #9 of 40 Old 04-22-2012, 01:02 PM
"Whose ABBA ZABBA?"
 
Bigdaa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Goleta, California
Posts: 17,119
Rep Power: 1
 
No 954 or anything like it.

I don't care if he is as level headed as Jesus.
One mistake on that kind of power and you may be in for total heartache.


I urge you to get him to consider something forgiving as a first bike!
This comes from a 56 year old guy who learned to ride a 90 at 12 years old.

Don't gamble with his life.

“In my opinion, the M1 rifle is the greatest battle implement ever devised.”
General George S. Patton
Bigdaa is offline  
post #10 of 40 Old 04-22-2012, 02:04 PM
Back in the day
 
Hondad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Melbourne, FL
Posts: 270
Rep Power: 1
 
I have to agree.
Do not let you son get a 954 as his first bike.
When I was looking for a sport-bike it was between a 954 and RC51. I chose the RC51 but I really liked to 954. The 954 is very light and as smooth as it gets. A bit twitchy but a steering damper cures that.
Probably the biggest issue is that an inexperienced rider will take there eyes off of the road ahead and look at something else and by the time they get there vision back to the road a head the closing distance is way to short and an accident happens. Also they do not look far enough ahead. This is learned from experience. A 954 has a lot of acceleration and smoothness so you do not feel the speed that you are going. That is what gets the inexperienced riders into the most trouble and just riding the bike to fast for conditions.

I would suggest a SV650s. There are always a lot of them for sale at reasonable prices. They are very reliable and easy on maintenance. With some suspension work it can handle with almost anything on the street. If his ego cant handle a SV650s then his maturity level is not what you think it is and a 954 would be a very costly.

I would also recommend MSF course and my be some track instruction.
This is my best advice. It would be the advice I would give my own son and I did.

Hondad is offline  
post #11 of 40 Old 04-22-2012, 02:11 PM
rmb
Let's go!
 
rmb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Sussex Couty NJ
Posts: 7,643
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Wrist Twisters Event Attendance Wrist Twisters Event Attendance Wrist Twisters Event Attendance Wrist Twisters Event Attendance 
Total Awards: 9

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigdaa View Post
No 954 or anything like it.

I don't care if he is as level headed as Jesus.
One mistake on that kind of power and you may be in for total heartache.


I urge you to get him to consider something forgiving as a first bike!


Don't gamble with his life.
This is a true statement(s). Has he ridden anything at all before now? Unless he's very experienced in the dirt or on two wheels of some sort I think it's a mistake starting on a 954, sooner or later he will grab a handfull and wish he didn't. Do this, buy the 954 AND a $500 beater to learn on and let him graduate.

rmb is offline  
post #12 of 40 Old 04-22-2012, 02:47 PM
Le So Cal Troll
 
nd4spdbh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: So Cal
Posts: 5,766
Rep Power: 1
 
question before this thread turns south quick.

Has your son had riding experience before? IE lots of dirtbike time etc etc?

nd4spdbh is offline  
post #13 of 40 Old 04-22-2012, 03:10 PM
The Cripple
 
Pvster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 8,743
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by carotman View Post
The fun thing with a powerful bike is that when you want less power, you just go easy on the throttle. With a small bike, you can't turn the throttle past the stop screw to get more power.
perhaps so, but its no longer fun when you exceed your capabilities on a more powerful bike and pay a high price for it. a novice rider will most certainly exceed their capabilities.

as for a "small bike", i've had a huge blast on the 250 ninja, some of my best cornering was done on that bike, and i intend to get another one! the 250 ninja is just as fast as most bikes in the twisties when in capable hands. that bike is a hoot!

Pvster is offline  
post #14 of 40 Old 04-22-2012, 03:51 PM
Woodward Ave
 
Bryan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Metro Detroit
Posts: 130
Rep Power: 1
 
Everything said in this thread has been spot on. I have been on the street for 5 years. Started on a 83 kz550, then went to a 99 vz800 marauder, then stepped up to the 919. Even with 5 years of experience I still feel like the 919 was a huge jump from the cruisers. I understand the cool factor of the 954, but you need to earn your stripes on 2 wheels.

Bryan is offline  
post #15 of 40 Old 04-22-2012, 04:34 PM
Tirone
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Australia
Posts: 71
Rep Power: 1
 
Wow,big call letting your son get a bike that big. Hope your not having a (my sons better than most other kids)moment.Be a hard thing to live with if he came unstuck.I even worry taking my daughters for a ride on my bike , in case they one day get onto the back of another bike and the rider is not as careful as me. But i'm over cautious. All the best.

cotso is offline  
post #16 of 40 Old 04-22-2012, 04:37 PM Thread Starter
Boilermaker in B-town
 
stamperman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Bloomington
Posts: 247
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Veteran 
Total Awards: 1

I've done my son a disservice in this thread. There's nothing squidly about him.
He's thoughtful, careful, and together.
He has eyes for the 954 because of it's appearance.
No, he has no real bike experience.
And maybe I've spent too much time on *slow* big bikes
You have all given me some food for thought.
I've revisited the situation with him and suggested he consider something smaller....
I owned a V65 Sabre in '84.....fastest production bike made that year.....then, I imagined what it would have been like if someone had handed me a *more powerful* bike than the Sabre in *'74* when I first started riding.....that helped get things in perspective
Thanks guys.


"First You Fly, Then You Die!"--Los Lobos
stamperman is offline  
post #17 of 40 Old 04-22-2012, 05:11 PM
Why's everything on fire?
 
CB700S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Dallas
Posts: 2,215
Rep Power: 1
 
Garage
I am just going to cut and paste some stuff I've posted to another forum in the past to save time.

Quote:
Newbies should get something 500cc or less, preferably 60hp or less, older, naked, fairly light, cheap and Japanese. (There are some few exceptions to these that were built specifically to be starter bikes - the later Nighthawk 750, Yamaha Seca II 600, Suzuki Bandit 600 among others) When equipped with the appropriate crash bars it will shrug off the usual newbie drops with minimal to no damage, they will be cheap to buy and repair, they're cheap to insure, and if you do total it nobody will care. More importantly, they will be pretty forgiving (due to weight and engineering) and won't go fast enough that you don't have sufficient time to correct any errors (most of the time). Most importantly, unlike sportbikes they won't teach you that the throttle is the answer to all problems - because it's not. It's really sad to see newer riders who started out on a sportbike get into a situation that they can't throttle out of who suddenly discover they don't have a ready answer to the problem (or worse, discover that the throttle made the problem worse and now they're really, really screwed); usually it ends up with them going to the hospital or worse when actually learning to use the rest of the bike other than the throttle would have saved them.
Quote:
The number one worst thing about a newbie learning to ride (and make no mistake, for the first six months you are still learning the basics in the real world) on a hypersport/high power machine is that they only ever seem to learn that applying the throttle is the solution to every problem that presents itself.

Yes, the throttle is an answer to quite a few problems.
No, it's not necessarily the best answer.
A thousand times no, it isn't the correct answer to a number of problems.

Those who start out on less powerful and more forgiving machines learn that there is more than one solution available to them to apply to problems on the road - such as maneuvering and brakes. They also learn conservation of kinetic energy and how to keep their speed up in turns better. All of which makes you a better rider, so come the day when that idiot cuts you off, you have more than one tool with which to deal with them. -snip-

"When in doubt, throttle out" does not necessarily apply to bikes and can actually get you killed.

Additionally, anything over 599cc will get you hammered on insurance as a newbie rider (with some few exceptions such as that Nighthawk 750) and you don't even want to think about a non-cruiser over 1000cc. -snip-

Edit: I'd also point out that despite the power and speed advantage (among a host of other advantages) the 919 has over my 700 I still find the 700 to be far more entertaining to ride. Raw power is not necessarily everything, especially when we're talking about bike speeds - a 'slow' bike is still faster than 90% of the cars on the market today.
I wish I had a dollar for every newbie rider I ever heard of who said, "It's okay, I'm responsible, I won't wreck it" when told that a sportbike was the wrong thing to start with, ignored it, then proceeded to totally destroy it in one or more wrecks in the first six months.

1986 Honda Nighthawk 700S
2002 Honda 919
CB700S is offline  
post #18 of 40 Old 04-22-2012, 05:13 PM
Hastatus Prior
 
TheBeeDeeGee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Mobile
Posts: 1,570
Rep Power: 1
 
As someone who started riding with limited dirt bike experience on the 599 I can tell you he could be very easily overwhelmed by the power of a 954.
After my 599 was totaled and I found a 919 for sale I was kinda anxious about it, and realized quickly the power of the 9er could get away from me very easily. He may be very level-headed, I like to think I am, but that power tempts you. You always want to use it, after having the 9er for a few days I just had to pin it and see what she had, with the power of a 954, sitting in that racey position it'll be begging him to put the hammer down.

"A motorcycle is not just a two-wheeled car; the difference between driving a car and climbing onto a motorcycle is the difference between watching TV and actually living your life."
-2005 CBR 600 F4i
-2001 RC51 ** SOLD
-2002 VFR 800**SOLD
-2002 919 **SOLD
-2006 599 ** WRECKED
TheBeeDeeGee is offline  
post #19 of 40 Old 04-22-2012, 05:26 PM
rmb
Let's go!
 
rmb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Sussex Couty NJ
Posts: 7,643
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Wrist Twisters Event Attendance Wrist Twisters Event Attendance Wrist Twisters Event Attendance Wrist Twisters Event Attendance 
Total Awards: 9

Quote:
Originally Posted by stamperman View Post
I've done my son a disservice in this thread. There's nothing squidly about him.
He's thoughtful, careful, and together.
He has eyes for the 954 because of it's appearance.
No, he has no real bike experience.
And maybe I've spent too much time on *slow* big bikes
You have all given me some food for thought.
I've revisited the situation with him and suggested he consider something smaller....
I owned a V65 Sabre in '84.....fastest production bike made that year.....then, I imagined what it would have been like if someone had handed me a *more powerful* bike than the Sabre in *'74* when I first started riding.....that helped get things in perspective
Thanks guys.
Good decision! FWIW, my first street bike was a Yamaha XS400, I looked like a polar bear humping a football riding it... I had a chance to ride a CBR900RR and scared the $hit outa myself and kept the 400 for a while.

rmb is offline  
post #20 of 40 Old 04-22-2012, 05:37 PM
Le So Cal Troll
 
nd4spdbh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: So Cal
Posts: 5,766
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stamperman View Post
I've done my son a disservice in this thread. There's nothing squidly about him.
He's thoughtful, careful, and together.
He has eyes for the 954 because of it's appearance.
No, he has no real bike experience.
And maybe I've spent too much time on *slow* big bikes
You have all given me some food for thought.
I've revisited the situation with him and suggested he consider something smaller....
I owned a V65 Sabre in '84.....fastest production bike made that year.....then, I imagined what it would have been like if someone had handed me a *more powerful* bike than the Sabre in *'74* when I first started riding.....that helped get things in perspective
Thanks guys.
Thats a big flag IMO...

Im 22 years old. Rode dirtbikes since i was 10, i have EXTENSIVE experience off road and a mastery of the workings of a bike (ie all functions, shifting clutch braking steering are ALL second nature) as well as 10k miles on a moped around the neighborhood between ages 13-18. My transition to actual street at age 18 was STILL a big shocker... being amongst cars etc etc. I was glad that actually handling a motorcycle was second nature so i could concentrate on the navigation / surroundings at hand.

There is NO way i would even want to start a motorcycle riding experience on a 919, let along a 954rr ...

Its just some food for thought. This is not to say your son cant do it, but if there isnt much / no experience there to begin with it might not be the best path. Power does get to the best of us ALL even experienced riders, but much MUCH more so to inexperienced riders.

Next question, how old is your son?

nd4spdbh is offline  
post #21 of 40 Old 04-22-2012, 06:42 PM
Discen
 
carotman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Montreal South Shore, Qc, Canada
Posts: 286
Rep Power: 1
 
My first bike was (is) the 919 that I own. Maybe because I used to ride 3wheelers, dirt bikes and ATVs a lot back when I was a teenager but I don't think this bike is hard to handle or has too much power. My girlfriend had a VTX1300 as her first bike and when she tried my 919, she instantly wanted one because it was easier to handle than her big cruiser. We couldn't find another 919 for a decent price so she opted for an almost brand new 599. My girlfriend had no bike experience and she handled the 919 just fine.

Of course a 954 has wayyy more power than our 919/599 but I would be more worried about the bike ergonomics for a beginner if he has no bike experience.

It's easier to lift the front wheel on those SuperSport bikes. The triple tree geometry makes them more prone to tank slappers also.

As a first bike for someone with no experience and 22 years old, I'd get a Standard or a sport Touring.

carotman is offline  
post #22 of 40 Old 04-22-2012, 07:00 PM
Tirone
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Kernersville
Posts: 28
Rep Power: 1
 
I dont care who you are or how much/little experience you have. After a few days of riding you feel comfortable enough that you just HAVE to open it up ! That will get real dangerous on a big sportbike really fast.
Everyone has seen or heard the horror stories . I know of a guy whos friend rode his bike a couple of times and thought he could ride, then just because he could afford it bought himself a brand spankin new hayabusa and promptly killed himself on it .

Dont let any stories scare you away from riding though, just start out a bit more realistically. Tell him if he starts with something smaller and enjoys riding then after 6 months you will help him get the 954 .If he really wants a bike and is gonna be a biker then 6 more months should be no big deal .

I rode lots of smaller dirtbikes as well. Mine was a yamaha 175 enduro lol . My brother had a Can-Am 400 and it scared the living shit outta me !

jbreddawg is offline  
post #23 of 40 Old 04-22-2012, 09:21 PM
Community Moderator
 
g00gl3it's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Idaho
Posts: 11,612
Rep Power: 1
  

Awards Showcase
Wrist Twisters Event Attendance Wrist Twisters Event Attendance Wrist Twisters Event Attendance 
Total Awards: 3

Just have him pay the insurance on it. That'll change his mind REAL quick.


+1 to everything above. DECADES of pure riding experience on this one thread alone. And even to most of us, the 954 would be considered a 'big boy' bike and one to be treated with respect.


I once shot a Browning 10 gauge with 3.5" shells in it when I was about 10 years old. Knocked me down before I could swear at it.

This would be a similar circumstance, only you're handing your son's life over when he puts that key in the ignition.

2009 Aprilia Tuono - Ginger
2001 XR650R BRP (Big Red Pig)
2006 Honda 599 - Ex wrecked it :-D
2007 Honda CB900F (sold)
2006 Honda VTX 1300C (sold)
YouTube Channel
g00gl3it is offline  
post #24 of 40 Old 04-23-2012, 04:57 AM
Aquilifer
 
Rich Jura's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: SW Michigan
Posts: 1,217
Rep Power: 1
 
What everyone else said, I'm 63, first bike was a Norton 750 Atlas in 1966. Which at the time was one of the 'big' bikes, at that time if you had a bike that would do the 1/4 in sub 12 seconds most likely you were taking it to the strip on a trailer with no lights, muffler or other street trim.
When I got my 919 it was the first bike that I didn't get on and hammer the throttle. It still amazes me how fast it is with mufflers, turn signals and full street trim plus it's not even considered a really fast bike today. . Sit down and watch some youtube videos containing fast bikes and fast cars, when things go wrong they go wrong FAST.
My son wanted to ride when he was 20, first 125 dirt bike, 600 Ninja, 600 Yamaha (forget the designation ). Now at 28 he has a 919, figured he'd buy one as he kept borrowing mine when he wanted to ride two up because he found it more comfortable than the crotch rocket ergonomics.
Excuse the babbling, with the 8 years I spent working at the bike shop just too many incidents that I witnessed. Being a father I still worry to which I'm sure you can relate.

Good Luck
Rich

Rich Jura is offline  
post #25 of 40 Old 04-25-2012, 08:54 AM
CBR 954rr
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 1
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nd4spdbh

+1 maybe an sv650
+1 on the SV. Bike handles great, looks great, sits comfortably, and it's bigger than a 250 (assuming your son is probably against riding a bike that "small").

I ride a 954. Not the greatest choice for a starter bike.

MissRumsey is offline  
post #26 of 40 Old 04-25-2012, 09:07 AM
Immune
 
bocomomark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Missouri
Posts: 312
Rep Power: 1
 
Definitly not a first bike for anyone under any circumstances. I haven't read all the previous posts, so forgive me if this has been pointed out already. While it has been pointed out that using less throttle (via discipline, maturity or self control) solves the problem, I think it's needs to be pointed out that its not that simple. Throttle control takes time and practice. For example the experienced rider has no problem manipulating the front brake and the throttle at the same time. however, the beginning rider can often crack open the throttle (on accident) at the very moment he is attempting to brake. That's too much bike for a first bike.

bocomomark is offline  
post #27 of 40 Old 04-25-2012, 09:34 AM
Serial Monogamist
 
ST-DocLizard1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Hampton, NJ
Posts: 1,491
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Wrist Twisters Event Attendance Wrist Twisters Event Attendance Wrist Twisters Event Attendance Wrist Twisters Event Attendance 
Total Awards: 21

My history without the benefit of an MSF course.

1978 KZ400 (sold after 1100 miles)
1979 CB750LTD (sold after 10,000 miles)
1981 GL1100 Interstate (still in garage gathering dust after 146,352 miles)

All were purchased new and delivered a really nice graduation over the first four seasons.


Doc



"FRIENDS DON'T LET FRIENDS EARLY APEX."
ST-DocLizard1 is offline  
post #28 of 40 Old 04-25-2012, 01:07 PM
...is a Nihonjin.
 
Shmoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Virginia
Posts: 1,573
Rep Power: 1
 
He's a kid, cut him a deal. Watch him do well and safe learning the basics, get him the 954 that he wants down the road

Something was said about cranking the throttle, I remember the first time I hamfisted the throttle on my first bike - I thought my hands were going to get ripped off. This was on a Bandit 600. The first week (probably the first day).

As far as issues, I've never heard of issues with that bike. Maybe the normal Honda r/r issue.

Shmoo is offline  
post #29 of 40 Old 04-25-2012, 01:18 PM
Hastatus Prior
 
TheBeeDeeGee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Mobile
Posts: 1,570
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shmoo View Post
Something was said about cranking the throttle, I remember the first time I hamfisted the throttle on my first bike - I thought my hands were going to get ripped off. This was on a Bandit 600. The first week (probably the first day).
.
I felt like this the first time I did it with the 919, a 954 woulda been intense for sure.

"A motorcycle is not just a two-wheeled car; the difference between driving a car and climbing onto a motorcycle is the difference between watching TV and actually living your life."
-2005 CBR 600 F4i
-2001 RC51 ** SOLD
-2002 VFR 800**SOLD
-2002 919 **SOLD
-2006 599 ** WRECKED
TheBeeDeeGee is offline  
post #30 of 40 Old 04-25-2012, 09:25 PM
Batman
 
velodesign's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Fargo
Posts: 1,053
Blog Entries: 3
Rep Power: 1
 
I'm not one usually for long words, but this got me thinking...How tall is your son? That should weed out a lot of questions / bikes right there. Short inseam and tallish sport bikes are not a good combo to work from for a beginner...well shit anyone like that for that matter.

If I may suggest something classy, retro, and lower for a new rider is find a used thruxton. It's new enough to be more reliable than a beater, It's low, its got loads of character, usable power but not insane (60hp?) And you should Bolt on the rear cowl with a combination lock so no passengers can ride with him either until AT LEAST 6 months. Something else new riders want to do is show off and take the hot cheerleader out for a ride...(this is a family show so ill stop there) ....unless you want him on a sport bike...then what about ninja 500?

So many things to learn...so many things to experience...id hate to do that learning on the bike of my teenage dreams...not to mention insurance. Ouch...

Anyways, good luck and keep us posted.

I may not have a lot to say but it doesn't mean I don't listen.
velodesign is offline  
post #31 of 40 Old 04-25-2012, 09:41 PM
What?
 
2002-919's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 428
Rep Power: 1
 
Plus chicks dig the Thruxton.


2002-919 is offline  
post #32 of 40 Old 04-25-2012, 11:29 PM
Le So Cal Troll
 
nd4spdbh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: So Cal
Posts: 5,766
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2002-919 View Post
Plus chicks dig the Thruxton.

chicks dig motorcycles in general.... ill walk the halls of my college, moto boots, nice jeans, moto jacket and helmet in hand.... i catch SOOOO many of them pretty much eye fucking me, its great.

nd4spdbh is offline  
post #33 of 40 Old 04-26-2012, 12:21 AM
Pilus Posterior
 
AllanB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 2,101
Blog Entries: 1
Rep Power: 1
 
On my side of the world you have to start on a small bike by law.

IMO it would be mental starting on a 954. Plain mental.

AllanB is offline  
post #34 of 40 Old 04-26-2012, 06:42 PM
Ben
 
HondaStreetfigh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Virginia
Posts: 1,392
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Veteran 
Total Awards: 1

My first was a 919...

Sent from my MB855 using Tapatalk 2

2 > 4
HondaStreetfigh is offline  
post #35 of 40 Old 05-16-2012, 06:06 AM
rider
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: douglasville, ga
Posts: 249
Rep Power: 1
 
NO! NO! NO! Have I made my point? I own a 954 and I've been riding for 40 yrs. No way should an inexperienced rider be on this bike.

My son (32 yrs old) wanted a bike. We bought an 82 goldwing. Fixed it up and now he's riding. He didn't like the idea at first but now realizes he's gaining valuable experience and loving the bike. Someday I'll let him ride my 919 and he can decide then if a sportbike is in his future.

If your son is determined to have a sport bike, the best money he'll ever spend is on a SV650. Dollar for dollar there isn't a better bike on the market.
You don't have to believe me, but that doesn't change the truth.

s10hornet is offline  
post #36 of 40 Old 05-16-2012, 07:43 AM
Optio
 
jay313's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Dallas
Posts: 833
Rep Power: 1
 
SV650 is a great bike with more than enough horsepower to get a newbie in over his head. A 954 that can lift the front wheel effortlessly in tall gears is asking for trouble. Throttle control takes time to learn. The first time he hits a pothole on a 954, he will accidentally open the throttle and send the front tire to the sky. Guaranteed. What happens after that is anyone's guess.

jay313 is offline  
post #37 of 40 Old 05-26-2018, 09:16 PM
Tirone
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 1
Rep Power: 1
 
Thumbs down honda cbr 954 2003

I was riding it when it just cut off ….now it want start fuel pump wont prime what should I do

curt8338 is offline  
post #38 of 40 Old 05-27-2018, 02:47 PM
"Whose ABBA ZABBA?"
 
Bigdaa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Goleta, California
Posts: 17,119
Rep Power: 1
 
You are speaking to ghosts (for the most part)
Fuse
Bad Fuel pump
Diablo likes this.

“In my opinion, the M1 rifle is the greatest battle implement ever devised.”
General George S. Patton
Bigdaa is offline  
post #39 of 40 Old 05-27-2018, 05:01 PM
Milites Gregarius
 
Coondawg07's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 105
Rep Power: 1
 
known "issues" w/Honda CBR 954RR?

Quote:
Originally Posted by curt8338 View Post
I was riding it when it just cut off ….now it want start fuel pump wont prime what should I do


Most older Honda’s have the fuel pump powered through the kill switch. I’ve actually had a loose wire in there cause a similar issue. Of course start with the easiest thing first. Check the fuses, then swap relays, etc.

Coondawg07 is offline  
post #40 of 40 Old 05-28-2018, 12:31 PM
Tesserarius
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 620
Rep Power: 1
 
To me, my 929, which is the predecessor of the 954, never felt right until I was doing 80 mph.

Sniper-x is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Wrist Twisters forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome