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post #1 of 25 Old 11-23-2015, 03:50 PM Thread Starter
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Want to BORROW a steering stem socket for the 919. Oem Honda is 100 bucks

Chinese knock offs are 45 bucks.

Anybody?

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post #2 of 25 Old 11-23-2015, 04:08 PM
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FYI: http://gl1800riders.com/forums/17-ho...?action=thread

1986 Honda Nighthawk 700S
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post #3 of 25 Old 11-23-2015, 04:43 PM Thread Starter
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I did see this buuuuuut I wanted to see if I could score the real deal.

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post #4 of 25 Old 11-23-2015, 06:05 PM
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Got mine off fleabay from jolly old England for $50 shipped to this side of the pond, looks to be every bit as sturdy as the one I spent a small fortune on for the VFR

Honda Steering Stem Headrace Socket PT No 7916 3710101 | eBay


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post #5 of 25 Old 11-23-2015, 06:55 PM Thread Starter
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So are you gunna let me borrow it?

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post #6 of 25 Old 11-23-2015, 07:20 PM
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Anytime I've needed one, I just cut up an old socket. Pulling the engine from a SV 650 required 2 different sizes.

Spoiler:

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post #7 of 25 Old 11-24-2015, 07:35 AM
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There is a guy named Cycledude over on the GL1800 forums that makes sockets and indeed an entire tool set for installing the bearings and such.



Well regarded, inexpensive. Cycledude's Steering Stem Socket and Race Tools - GL1800Riders

Last I looked the socket by itself cost $40 from him and was made in USA. Last email address I have for him is [email protected].

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post #8 of 25 Old 11-25-2015, 10:31 AM
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Use channel locks or a spanner wrench. If you have to have one, you can borrow (have) mine for $25.00 shipped to your door. It's been used once.

Robert

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post #9 of 25 Old 11-25-2015, 10:35 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by HRC27 View Post
Use channel locks or a spanner wrench. If you have to have one, you can borrow (have) mine for $25.00 shipped to your door. It's been used once.
I want to get the torque specs correct on it, it's important a to me I do it correctly.

Let me see if I can source one to just use here. I don't wanna take your tools just borrow them

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post #10 of 25 Old 11-25-2015, 10:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nickr919 View Post
I want to get the torque specs correct on it, it's important a to me I do it correctly.

Let me see if I can source one to just use here. I don't wanna take your tools just borrow them
In other words, why buy it for $25 if you can use one for free.

Your gonna' spend $10+ on shipping to borrow, why not spend an extra $15 and own it. I paid $50 for it. Just saying.

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post #11 of 25 Old 11-25-2015, 11:25 AM Thread Starter
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I'm a cheap bastard at heart lol

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post #12 of 25 Old 11-25-2015, 12:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Nickr919 View Post
I'm a cheap bastard at heart lol
Most of us cyclist are....lol Shoot me that Paypal before 3:30 and I'll drop it off today. If later, will send Friday.

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post #13 of 25 Old 11-25-2015, 12:29 PM
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If you're really cheap, you spend $5 on a socket and make your own. It only takes 5 minutes.

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post #14 of 25 Old 11-25-2015, 01:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nickr919 View Post
I want to get the torque specs correct on it, it's important a to me I do it correctly.

Let me see if I can source one to just use here. I don't wanna take your tools just borrow them

There are quite a few threads out there about this. You will quickly find that when dealing with items outside of the engine that correct torque specs and correct assembly are two completely different things when it comes to the real world. Due to variables in lube, thread wear, calibration etc it is VERY UNLIKELY that you would achieve proper resistance by simply using a spec out of the service manual. Compound that problem by the fact that tightening the top clamp nut also affects the lock nuts under the clamp and you have something that really needs to be done to feel rather than by the book.

I firmly understand that this concept is foreign to many novice mechanics, but that is what separates Professionals from the Shade Trees

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post #15 of 25 Old 11-25-2015, 01:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LDH View Post
There are quite a few threads out there about this. You will quickly find that when dealing with items outside of the engine that correct torque specs and correct assembly are two completely different things when it comes to the real world. Due to variables in lube, thread wear, calibration etc it is VERY UNLIKELY that you would achieve proper resistance by simply using a spec out of the service manual. Compound that problem by the fact that tightening the top clamp nut also affects the lock nuts under the clamp and you have something that really needs to be done to feel rather than by the book.

I firmly understand that this concept is foreign to many novice mechanics, but that is what separates Professionals from the Shade Trees
Absolutely spot on.
Steering head setup is best by feel.
It can be frustrating, though.
One gets it within a few tries, or has to spend countless trying just to get it "just so".

Worse yet, someone trying to do the setup with entire front end in place ........................

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post #16 of 25 Old 11-25-2015, 02:31 PM Thread Starter
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Who said anything about going by service manual torque specs

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post #17 of 25 Old 11-25-2015, 04:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LDH View Post
There are quite a few threads out there about this. You will quickly find that when dealing with items outside of the engine that correct torque specs and correct assembly are two completely different things when it comes to the real world. Due to variables in lube, thread wear, calibration etc it is VERY UNLIKELY that you would achieve proper resistance by simply using a spec out of the service manual. Compound that problem by the fact that tightening the top clamp nut also affects the lock nuts under the clamp and you have something that really needs to be done to feel rather than by the book.

I firmly understand that this concept is foreign to many novice mechanics, but that is what separates Professionals from the Shade Trees
This is exactly why I use channel locks. We never used a spec when setting rotor bearings, for example, when I was an auto tech.

No hard feelings if you want to pass on this one.


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post #18 of 25 Old 11-25-2015, 04:10 PM
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It only takes 5 minutes.
TWSS

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post #19 of 25 Old 11-25-2015, 07:37 PM Thread Starter
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But seriously can you guys tech me to be a professional mechanic? Is there a rule of thumb or method to it?

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post #20 of 25 Old 11-25-2015, 08:39 PM
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TWSS
Damn you!

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post #21 of 25 Old 11-25-2015, 11:37 PM
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But seriously can you guys tech me to be a professional mechanic? Is there a rule of thumb or method to it?
I was told here that, with the front end elevated, the forks should fall slowly to the stops - not slam.

Not sure if that is "by the book" advice but I have been 85+ with no head shake and my steering is very smooth so I'm good with it.

Hopefully, someone else will chim in.


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post #22 of 25 Old 11-26-2015, 09:16 AM Thread Starter
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Cmon LDH quit eatin turkey and give me some advice damnit!!

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post #23 of 25 Old 11-26-2015, 10:00 AM
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Cmon LDH quit eatin turkey and give me some advice damnit!!
He already did

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post #24 of 25 Old 11-27-2015, 08:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HRC27 View Post
I was told here that, with the front end elevated, the forks should fall slowly to the stops - not slam.


I'm strangely disturbed that anyone would remember that.

https://www.wristtwisters.com/forums/...tml#post986249

Quote:
The rule of thumb on the steering is that with the front end suspended so that the front can swing freely side to side you want the steering to swing just free enough that it can go lock to lock with just enough resistance to keep it from banging on the steering stops. If it just flops all the way to one side or the other on its own then it is too loose.

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post #25 of 25 Old 11-27-2015, 08:28 AM
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I'm strangely disturbed that anyone would remember that.
It was early this year

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