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post #1 of 83 Old 12-06-2009, 03:39 PM Thread Starter
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Road Bike

I'm stupid with roadbikes.

Find me a deal on one.

54-56cm

Carbon frame

Looked at a Cervelo RS and liked it.

Let me know where to send the money. Thanks.

'02 RC-51
'10 Unicycle

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post #2 of 83 Old 12-06-2009, 04:48 PM
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eBay is your friend. You can get super deals on bike stuff on eBay but you need to now what you want and what frame by what manufacturer will fit you.

A 56cm by 1 company/model could be way huge where another is perfect. The frame designs and methods of measurement can differ dramatically even within the same manufacturer across different models. You got some homework to do unless you're buying from a bike shop where they know all the ins and outs. Or you can go to bike shops and have them help you figure out what you want then go find it for 1/2 price on eBay.

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post #3 of 83 Old 12-06-2009, 05:06 PM
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Instead how about a steel cross bike with wide tires to handle your rain/mud?

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post #4 of 83 Old 12-06-2009, 05:30 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dream View Post
Instead how about a steel cross bike with wide tires to handle your rain/mud?
I have a MTB and it hardly rains here compared to the Midwest, you've been lied to.

http://www.weather.com/outlook/trave...opnav_business

I want to stick with a carbon frame and higher end parts. I made the mistake of buying a MTB with cheaper components when I started getting into that and it didn't last long before I dumped it for Shimano XT. So learning from that, something like Ultegra or SRAM bits would be good.

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post #5 of 83 Old 12-07-2009, 07:19 AM
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Cannondale all the way. Trust me on this one, I've owned them all over the past 20 years.

Go with at least 105 components.

I sold a Cannondale R900 this last summer with full Campy for $650.

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post #6 of 83 Old 12-07-2009, 07:24 AM
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It all comes down to fit.

As for Cannondale all the way... never fit me right on the mountian bike side, and rode bikes are "OK" - but there is no Carbon C-dale and that is what he is looking for. (That said I do have a Capo)

Also... Cannondale of 10 years ago is not the same as C-dale of today. Amazing how dealers keep buyouts quiet....

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post #7 of 83 Old 12-07-2009, 07:47 AM
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Just send me the money, I'll have it wrapped up and delivered for christmas.

Does it need to be pink to match your current biking gear, and do you want the standard or extra long tassles on the bars??

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post #8 of 83 Old 12-07-2009, 09:43 AM Thread Starter
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So far I've tried the Trek Madone 5.2 Pro and the Cervelo RS. They feel like... bicycles. I'll need more saddle time before I can tell any difference, I guess. Maybe I should get something much cheaper since I can't tell the difference but then I'll probably go back to what I said above and want to upgrade to something better sooner than later. Ack.

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Just send me the money, I'll have it wrapped up and delivered for christmas.

Does it need to be pink to match your current biking gear, and do you want the standard or extra long tassles on the bars??
I will email you a pic of my boobie tassles so you can get the tassles on the bars matched up.

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post #9 of 83 Old 12-07-2009, 10:36 AM
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Carbon, steel and ti are all flexi. Flexi = comfy.

Aluminum = stiff and quick.

Go to Seven Cycles and check out how they rate things.

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post #10 of 83 Old 12-07-2009, 12:21 PM
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OMG, the WestCoast Heathnut Weinies have gotten to you...

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post #11 of 83 Old 12-07-2009, 12:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ragdoll View Post
So far I've tried the Trek Madone 5.2 Pro and the Cervelo RS. They feel like... bicycles. I'll need more saddle time before I can tell any difference, I guess. Maybe I should get something much cheaper since I can't tell the difference but then I'll probably go back to what I said above and want to upgrade to something better sooner than later. Ack.



I will email you a pic of my boobie tassles so you can get the tassles on the bars matched up.
If you can't tell much of a difference than I would try one of these.

Road Bikes, Roadbikes - 2009 Motobecane Immortal Pro


You can't go wrong with a $1300 105/Ultegra equiped Carbon bike.

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post #12 of 83 Old 12-07-2009, 06:29 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hondaf4iguy View Post
Carbon, steel and ti are all flexi. Flexi = comfy.

Aluminum = stiff and quick.

Go to Seven Cycles and check out how they rate things.
Heh... I am well aware of Seven7 Cycles... I'm not going to spend that much.

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post #13 of 83 Old 12-07-2009, 06:58 PM
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They have something similar to a Dyno Chart. Shows you what each bike is good for. You can use that to help decide material and geometry.

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post #14 of 83 Old 12-07-2009, 07:09 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hondaf4iguy View Post
They have something similar to a Dyno Chart. Shows you what each bike is good for. You can use that to help decide material and geometry.
Ohhh, gotcha!

Will check it out. Thanks.

'02 RC-51
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post #15 of 83 Old 12-07-2009, 07:33 PM
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ya know walmart has a carbon fiber road bike for ~1500 bucks that people were actually saying was well worth the money



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post #16 of 83 Old 12-08-2009, 05:40 AM
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Ahh finally, something I can give advice on rather than ask for advice.

Aluminum CAN BE harsh/buzzy but the material alone doesn't determine the ride quality but it's the way the material is put to use on the frame design and the geometry just like CF can be stiff too depending on the design but it's generally a better material for absorbing road vibes and chatter. If you want a responsive, racy bike, guess what...it's gonna be stiff and somewhat buzzy wether aluminum or CF. Comfort is a very relative term when it comes to roadbikes. Next to the frame the wheelset will make the biggest impact on the ride quality.

A 56 is a 56 no matter what manufacturer you choose. It's a level line (parrallel to the ground) from the centerline of the seat tube to the centerline of the head tube.

If you're not too experienced a cyclist, you will likely not feel much of a difference between a madone and a RS. Both are great race-level bikes, but the finer points will not be apparent to someone who isn't on the saddle day in and day out and has a lotta miles and a riding style/preference. Based on what you said about your MTB, get at least Ultegra upwards (or similar level in SRAM or Campy). HAving said that, if your the kind of guy who likes top shelf stuff, a custom fitted seven a great thing to consider. Their old-scool round tubes aren't a purdy as the aero-tubed stuff out there but they make an excellent bike. Whatever you choose, get a knowledgeable fitter to fit you properly. It makes all the difference.

I ride Cervelo and dig it. So I vote Cervelo. Remember though, performance-oriented road bikes aren't the most comfortable things, so be prepared for some break in aches and pains.

Well, after all that I see that I typed a whole lotta stuff that doesn't really answer your query. "Find me a deal"...

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post #17 of 83 Old 12-08-2009, 09:53 AM
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There are some great road bike shops in Seattle, I can recall one real old school one near to either the causeway or Pike's Place.

Look for something non-current. Road bikes are very refined so you'll be getting not so current colours or decals but you won't miss any gee-whiz new parts (unless you must have the electronic Dura-Ace).

If you tend to crash, knock around, or otherwise abuse your bike you might want to avoid high performance CF models. On some the tubes will be paper thin. The bike in the picutre is now fully built and scales at 16 lbs with a couple bottle cages but there is not much margin for me to ride through a ditch or hit something if I'm not paying attention.
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post #18 of 83 Old 12-08-2009, 10:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Danke View Post
There are some great road bike shops in Seattle, I can recall one real old school one near to either the causeway or Pike's Place.

Look for something non-current. Road bikes are very refined so you'll be getting not so current colours or decals but you won't miss any gee-whiz new parts (unless you must have the electronic Dura-Ace).

If you tend to crash, knock around, or otherwise abuse your bike you might want to avoid high performance CF models. On some the tubes will be paper thin. The bike in the picutre is now fully built and scales at 16 lbs with a couple bottle cages but there is not much margin for me to ride through a ditch or hit something if I'm not paying attention.
No wonder its 16lbs. Its missing the BB, crank, F/R deraileurs.

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post #19 of 83 Old 12-08-2009, 11:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pacojerte View Post
ya know walmart has a carbon fiber road bike for ~1500 bucks that people were actually saying was well worth the money

wally world.
it's nicer than my oldie though.

Walmart.com: Corsa FC Lightweight Full Carbon Fiber Road Bike: Bikes, Scooters & Skates

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post #20 of 83 Old 12-08-2009, 11:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Danke View Post
There are some great road bike shops in Seattle, I can recall one real old school one near to either the causeway or Pike's Place.

Look for something non-current. Road bikes are very refined so you'll be getting not so current colours or decals but you won't miss any gee-whiz new parts (unless you must have the electronic Dura-Ace).

If you tend to crash, knock around, or otherwise abuse your bike you might want to avoid high performance CF models. On some the tubes will be paper thin. The bike in the picutre is now fully built and scales at 16 lbs with a couple bottle cages but there is not much margin for me to ride through a ditch or hit something if I'm not paying attention.
It's an honest 16 built up. FSA carbon cranks, regular Ultegra pedals, Dura Ace derailleurs. I think there are probably less that 50 of these worldwide, the frame is a big different than the full bike. It has a half oversize and half regular head tube and a seatstay that has a split section instead of solid.

Lighter pedals and wheels would shave quite a bit off but it's almost too light right now.

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post #21 of 83 Old 12-08-2009, 12:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Danke View Post
It's an honest 16 built up. FSA carbon cranks, regular Ultegra pedals, Dura Ace derailleurs. I think there are probably less that 50 of these worldwide, the frame is a big different than the full bike. It has a half oversize and half regular head tube and a seatstay that has a split section instead of solid.

Lighter pedals and wheels would shave quite a bit off but it's almost too light right now.
Just bugging you, I like your build and 16lbs is not unreasonable. Plus anything below 16 and changes will disqualify you from road races anyway.

My buddy is a Kona dealer and I was looking at the steel Kona Haole. Partially because I am an old school road racer and partially becuase I can't stand seeing a $2,000 carbon frame breaking going over a pot hole. I rule out alum becuase it is too stiff and unforgiving.

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post #22 of 83 Old 12-08-2009, 02:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by honda ng gingsa View Post

A 56 is a 56 no matter what manufacturer you choose. It's a level line (parrallel to the ground) from the centerline of the seat tube to the centerline of the head tube.

.
This bit of info is actually not accurate. Even within a manufacturer 2 56cm frames can be hugely different in how they fit. The most obvious example is sloped vs horizontal top tubes. A 56cm measured c-t (typical) is usually (not always) considered a medium sized frame. A sloped top tube 56 cm frame measure c-t is generally at least large or extra large. And different manufacturers measure differently. Most measure from crank center to the top of the top tube (C-T). Some measure from crank center to the center of the top tube (C-C). with large diameter tubes, it can make a significant difference. If you visit my favorite factory's web site you'll see some of what I'm talking about:

Specialized Bicycle Components : FAQ

Here is a useful chart. It shows that for different bikes from the same manufacturer, the best frame size for an average 5'8" male rider varies from 52cm to 58cm depending on the bike:
http://specialized.custhelp.com/cgi-...344668&p_olh=0

And these are all sloping top tubes.

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post #23 of 83 Old 12-08-2009, 03:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catonsvilleguy View Post
This bit of info is actually not accurate. Even within a manufacturer 2 56cm frames can be hugely different in how they fit. The most obvious example is sloped vs horizontal top tubes. A 56cm measured c-t (typical) is usually (not always) considered a medium sized frame. A sloped top tube 56 cm frame measure c-t is generally at least large or extra large. And different manufacturers measure differently. Most measure from crank center to the top of the top tube (C-T). Some measure from crank center to the center of the top tube (C-C). with large diameter tubes, it can make a significant difference. If you visit my favorite factory's web site you'll see some of what I'm talking about:

Specialized Bicycle Components : FAQ

Here is a useful chart. It shows that for different bikes from the same manufacturer, the best frame size for an average 5'8" male rider varies from 52cm to 58cm depending on the bike:
http://specialized.custhelp.com/cgi-...344668&p_olh=0

And these are all sloping top tubes.
Gonna have to respectfully agree to disagree with you on this. Sloped or horizontal, large tube or small a 56 is a 56 in my book. It's center of seatube (fat or narrow tubes, doesnt matter, cause the center is always the center wether its a fat tube or a narrow tube) to center of headtube measured along the virtual line parralell to the ground that bisects the seatbube and headtube, so wether sloping or not, the measure is constant.

But I will agree that a 56 in one manufacturer can be a different "fit" to a 56 in another manufacturer but if you measure them in a constant way (as above), a 56 will be a 56. They may fit and feel different, but the measure will be constant if measured in a constant way.

I can agree with your sizing chart though, 2 or 3 sizes different sizes can be set-up to "fit" a rider of average dimensions. (e.g. a 54 frame with a 110 stem might fit the same guy on a 56 frame with a 100 stem). If I understand Specialized chart correctly, this is what it's saying.

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post #24 of 83 Old 12-08-2009, 04:20 PM
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Ahh, I see what you mean now.

I'm saying the measure will be constant if you break out the tape and measure frame to frame in a constant way. Your whole point is it's not measured in a constant way.

Agreed. Yes, correct.

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post #25 of 83 Old 12-08-2009, 04:39 PM
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Top tube length is far more important than seattube length anyway.
But since shops dont talk about it, the average persona has no idea what true size bike the need. I dont care is you have a 36" inseam and can straddle a 64/65 cm frame. If you can't reach the bars, it is no good for you!

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post #26 of 83 Old 12-08-2009, 05:54 PM Thread Starter
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I just got back from an extended test ride on a Cervelo RS (56cm)

First of all, I'm frickin BEAT! The path they suggested I take was something an avid cyclist probably would take(lots of hills). I lived on 1st gear for a while and all I could think is, "This thing better come with a different crank if I buy it!" It has a 53/39 on it now. We need a compact set for a wuss like me! Part of it is that it was that the sun was going down and it was in the upper 20's, the other part is that since my motorcycle crash in September I haven't done a dang thing and I'm out of shape!

Anyways. Very smooth ride, not much to complain about. The one thing I like about the Cervelo RS verses other bikes in its price-range/class is that the stem tube thingy is taller than most anything else. It's less aggressive in feel and gives some nice comfort, I guess

I just need to ride a few more before I can speak much more on which bike I like. I'm going to go try a Specialized aluminum frame tomorrow to see how it feels, see if I can sense the difference.

That said, I'm not sold on any bike yet so any thoughts or opinions you guys have are read and appreciated

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post #27 of 83 Old 12-08-2009, 06:14 PM
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i personally like cross bikes for the added durability.
They give up speed, but add strength....

and geared lower just for you.

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post #28 of 83 Old 12-08-2009, 07:18 PM
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i got my mb working.... and have been making ~10mile rides on the city *(chinese pronunciation) streets around here.... ugh.... but the soreness is fading....

hope you find the bike your looking for at the price you want....



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post #29 of 83 Old 12-08-2009, 09:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hondaf4iguy View Post
i personally like cross bikes for the added durability.
They give up speed, but add strength....

and geared lower just for you.
+1, but most are stock dual chainrings.
I upgraded my steel road bikes to triples.
AL road frames are miserably stiff, don't do it!
Try a Ti frame.
Got worn out on a test ride...you need a bike!
...not just for hanging out at the coffee shop.

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post #30 of 83 Old 12-08-2009, 11:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hondaf4iguy View Post
Top tube length is far more important than seattube length anyway.
But since shops dont talk about it, the average persona has no idea what true size bike the need. I dont care is you have a 36" inseam and can straddle a 64/65 cm frame. If you can't reach the bars, it is no good for you!
Correct! When we say 56 road frame that is top tube measurement. Road frames are not sized by seatube length which is pretty irrelevant given the variables of modern frame design. Top tube length is an absolute measure but often times a virtual measurement now cause of the sloping designs.

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post #31 of 83 Old 12-08-2009, 11:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ragdoll View Post
I just got back from an extended test ride on a Cervelo RS (56cm)

First of all, I'm frickin BEAT! The path they suggested I take was something an avid cyclist probably would take(lots of hills). I lived on 1st gear for a while and all I could think is, "This thing better come with a different crank if I buy it!" It has a 53/39 on it now. We need a compact set for a wuss like me! Part of it is that it was that the sun was going down and it was in the upper 20's, the other part is that since my motorcycle crash in September I haven't done a dang thing and I'm out of shape!

Anyways. Very smooth ride, not much to complain about. The one thing I like about the Cervelo RS verses other bikes in its price-range/class is that the stem tube thingy is taller than most anything else. It's less aggressive in feel and gives some nice comfort, I guess

I just need to ride a few more before I can speak much more on which bike I like. I'm going to go try a Specialized aluminum frame tomorrow to see how it feels, see if I can sense the difference.

That said, I'm not sold on any bike yet so any thoughts or opinions you guys have are read and appreciated
Not sure how the bikes are spec'd in the US but it could also help to have shallow drop handlebars on the bike you eventually choose if your flexibilty is not so good. Just another "comfort" consideration.

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post #32 of 83 Old 12-09-2009, 06:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by honda ng gingsa View Post
Correct! When we say 56 road frame that is top tube measurement. Road frames are not sized by seatube length which is pretty irrelevant given the variables of modern frame design. Top tube length is an absolute measure but often times a virtual measurement now cause of the sloping designs.
Ahhhhhhhhhh........ Not.........Really............True. Virtually all manufacturers' published frame sizes for road bikes and others refer to some measurement along the seat tube, NOT the top tube. The most commonly used frame size measurement is from the center of the crank to the top of the top tube or center to center, measured along the seat tube.

Here's a link for more (accurate) info:
Bicycle frame - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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post #33 of 83 Old 12-09-2009, 07:11 AM
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DO NOT buy a Specialized. I have a 2009 Spec Allez elite (Alum/Carbon w/ Zertz anti-vibe inserts) and they are not worth the money. For the same price or just a few dollars more, you should look at the Cannondale Six or Giant Defy advanced with a compact crankset and something like a 12-27 cassette for climbing hills. You can always upgrade components as you ride more. Sometimes it's cheaper to buy the components already installed, but I have found some kick-ass deals on Dura-Ace 7800 series all over Ebay.

I'm currently running a Dura-Ace front Deraileur, 105 rear, compact Tiagra crankset and just picked up a pair of Ultegra brake calipers w/ new pads for $25 at a bike swap meet. I bought the bike new in March of this year and have just a tick over 4,000 miles on it since then. My plan is to strip everything off this winter and buy a Carbon frame/fork combo for next season, since I plan on racing UCI events.

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post #34 of 83 Old 12-09-2009, 07:14 AM
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I bought the bike new in March of this year and have just a tick over 4,000 miles on it since then.
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post #35 of 83 Old 12-09-2009, 03:30 PM
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Random thoughts, steel and Ti can both give a great ride but steel can be heavy and Ti can be expensive. How much do you scale at?

Cross vs. road. For a daliy driver this can be a great choice but if you plan to go on a few semi serious rides with other road folks the a cross bike can feel like a boat anchor when the chips are down. It also won't brake as well as a road bike on a fast descent (for some of us that's our only chance to keep up with the fit folks).

I like long cranks on my bike, I'm a bit of diesel so I chug vs rev along.

You may want to avoid roads you love to ride on a motorcycle. Long grinding hills can seem to appear out of nowhere and really knock you back on your heels.

The Haole is a great bike that goes back to the old lugged bikes everyone used to ride. What shop is your buddy at Joe?

And last save a good chunk of cash for real road shoes, and pedals. Get something with a very stiff carbon sole and don't use the small off road type cleats. The small contact area will create a hot spot on your sole.

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post #36 of 83 Old 12-09-2009, 03:50 PM
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Regarding steel.... my steel mountain bike frame is 4lbs.
My old Cannondale frame was 3.5. lbs....

Good steel is not too heavy at all.

Virginia Beach Remodeling
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Ride In Peace Marcus Randolph (Kahuna) 12/17/06
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post #37 of 83 Old 12-09-2009, 03:51 PM
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For not so serious road bikers who live where it is not flat, I highly recommend triple chain rings up front. You probably won't need the granny gear very often but when you need it, it sure is nice to have it. The only penalty is a few ounces of extra weight. The benefits are huge when you are tired and hit that last steep hill on the way home.

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post #38 of 83 Old 12-09-2009, 04:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catonsvilleguy View Post
Ahhhhhhhhhh........ Not.........Really............True. Virtually all manufacturers' published frame sizes for road bikes and others refer to some measurement along the seat tube, NOT the top tube. The most commonly used frame size measurement is from the center of the crank to the top of the top tube or center to center, measured along the seat tube.

Here's a link for more (accurate) info:
Bicycle frame - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Gonna have to agree to disagree with you again here. You might wanna click on the "discussion link on bike sizing " on your original wiki link. Which will bring you here
Revisionist Frame Sizing--by Sheldon Brown
Maybe I'm out of touch but I've only seen MTB's sized to seatube/standover. Road frames I have always known to be sized to toptube (virtual reach)

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post #39 of 83 Old 12-09-2009, 04:39 PM
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Been out of biking awhile now ( still have my Paramount Track and Raliegh Pro), the only thing I can say is steel fails gracefully. All that carbon stuff just makes me nervous.
YouTube - Mountain Bike High Speed Record Accident
YouTube - F117 Stealth Jet Crash
I'll wager they are a bit more critical with the F117's then bicycles.

Rich

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post #40 of 83 Old 12-09-2009, 05:46 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Danke View Post
Random thoughts, steel and Ti can both give a great ride but steel can be heavy and Ti can be expensive. How much do you scale at?

And last save a good chunk of cash for real road shoes, and pedals. Get something with a very stiff carbon sole and don't use the small off road type cleats. The small contact area will create a hot spot on your sole.
Ti doesn't seem as pricey as it used to... cheaper than Carbon depending on where you look. I'm around 190lbs at the moment, should be around 180lbs. I haven't been at all active since my Sept motorcycle accident. Now I'm itchin to get back at it.

I'll plan on buying some nice gear once I figure the bicycle part out. I'll concern myself with getting exactly what I want before I concern myself with cost, I always find deals.

As with everything, I only buy top notch stuff at bargain prices.

'02 RC-51
'10 Unicycle

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