Trusting your Torque wrench - Wrist Twisters
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 15 Old 06-10-2011, 01:35 PM Thread Starter
Traitor
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Ottawa Ontario
Posts: 65
Rep Power: 1
 
Trusting your Torque wrench

I really hope I'm not alone on this but I just don't trust my torque wrench... I know I over torqued a bolt last night but the wrench didn't click that the torque setting had been reached.

Luckily I didn't strip or damage anything but I've had this happen before and now I'm questioning whether or not I can work a relatively simple tool

Any pro tips out there?

Davreece is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 15 Old 06-10-2011, 01:45 PM
Two Wheeled Warlord
 
Danke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Salmon Arm, B.C.
Posts: 1,143
Rep Power: 1
 
I like practicing on a bigger bolt first. Let's say I have to torque a caliper bolt at XX inch pounds. I'll take a couple practice swings at another bolt that requires a higher torque than that like a foot peg or axle one.

This lets you get the motion down. I know on some wrenches it takes a decent throw to get the click etc. If you go halfway, back off and try again you may not get it set.

If you are super nervous about this (and it can be an expensive way to make mistakes) get a break over wrench. That means when you get to the set value the wrench goes free and can't wreck stuff.

Danke is offline  
post #3 of 15 Old 06-10-2011, 01:48 PM
...is a Nihonjin.
 
Shmoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Virginia
Posts: 1,573
Rep Power: 1
 
What brand torque wrench are you using?

I have a cheap harbor freight which I don't trust - so I just picked up a Craftsman pendulum type (my mtn bike precision tq wrench is a pendulum type). The Craftsman range to 75 ft lbs I believe.

Shmoo is offline  
 
post #4 of 15 Old 06-10-2011, 01:50 PM
Le So Cal Troll
 
nd4spdbh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: So Cal
Posts: 5,766
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Danke View Post
I like practicing on a bigger bolt first. Let's say I have to torque a caliper bolt at XX inch pounds. I'll take a couple practice swings at another bolt that requires a higher torque than that like a foot peg or axle one.

This lets you get the motion down. I know on some wrenches it takes a decent throw to get the click etc. If you go halfway, back off and try again you may not get it set.

If you are super nervous about this (and it can be an expensive way to make mistakes) get a break over wrench. That means when you get to the set value the wrench goes free and can't wreck stuff.
other than your knuckles. haha.

never had any problems over torquing stuff with my el cheapo harbor freight 1/4in and 1/2in torque wrenches, they click like they should all the time.

The main thing is to make sure you back off the adjustment compeltly so the spring isnt compressed for long periods of time... this will make the wrench vastly incorrect.

nd4spdbh is offline  
post #5 of 15 Old 06-10-2011, 02:06 PM
The chill Moderator
 
07919Dave's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: COS:CO
Posts: 3,304
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Veteran 
Total Awards: 1

What brand and how long have you had it? What bolt where you torquing? It might be time for a new one. I let mine click then I go a little more after that. I give it a little go again and if I get the double click I know it is good.

Never Trade the Thrills of Living for the Security of Existence.
07919Dave is offline  
post #6 of 15 Old 06-10-2011, 02:55 PM
Why's everything on fire?
 
CB700S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Dallas
Posts: 2,258
Rep Power: 1
 
Garage
Remember to always set your torque wrenches back to zero when you're done with them; this will help keep them calibrated.

1986 Honda Nighthawk 700S
2002 Honda 919
CB700S is offline  
post #7 of 15 Old 06-10-2011, 03:23 PM
...is a Nihonjin.
 
Shmoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Virginia
Posts: 1,573
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nd4spdbh View Post
other than your knuckles. haha.

never had any problems over torquing stuff with my el cheapo harbor freight 1/4in and 1/2in torque wrenches, they click like they should all the time.

The main thing is to make sure you back off the adjustment compeltly so the spring isnt compressed for long periods of time... this will make the wrench vastly incorrect.
I've had two 1/2in tq wrenches from Harbor Freight. My first one, which was burnt to crisp in a garage fire, was within 3-4lbs of my buddy's Craftsman (which isn't a GREAT tq wrench). My second HF tq wrench was wayyyy off. I don't trust this one any further than I can throw it (Rooney).

Shmoo is offline  
post #8 of 15 Old 06-10-2011, 04:21 PM
Aquilifer
 
Rich Jura's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: SW Michigan
Posts: 1,217
Rep Power: 1
 
You could always get one of these if you don't trust your clicker.Amazon.com: Park Tool Torque Wrench - TW-1/TW-2: Sports & Outdoors


Rich

Rich Jura is offline  
post #9 of 15 Old 06-10-2011, 10:21 PM
Canyon Junkie
 
919rocket's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Littleton, CO
Posts: 140
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Veteran 
Total Awards: 1

You get what you pay for as a general rule with tools. I will torque wheels with my crapsman torque wrench at home--anything else and I bring home the big $ Snap On variety from work. My newest purchase was a 3/8 0-100 lb/ft digital that will do angle, ft lbs, inch lbs, and Nm. $450 and worth every penny. My other mechanical click-type were $200-350 each, one inch/lb 40-250, one 1/2 inch 50-250 ft/lbs. Not bragging, just saying. I own the one at home, but use the others if it's really precision. My $.02. Dave

Are we having fun yet?
919rocket is offline  
post #10 of 15 Old 06-11-2011, 02:40 PM
McTavish
 
mcromo44's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Calgary
Posts: 5,656
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 919rocket View Post
You get what you pay for as a general rule with tools. I will torque wheels with my crapsman torque wrench at home--anything else and I bring home the big $ Snap On variety from work. My newest purchase was a 3/8 0-100 lb/ft digital that will do angle, ft lbs, inch lbs, and Nm. $450 and worth every penny. My other mechanical click-type were $200-350 each, one inch/lb 40-250, one 1/2 inch 50-250 ft/lbs. Not bragging, just saying. I own the one at home, but use the others if it's really precision. My $.02. Dave
You get what you pay for BUT only get the proper results out of it if one uses it properly and stores it correctly.

Never go beyond the rated limit.
Never drop it or shock it.
Never leave on a surface that has dirt.
Never store click types without backing them off.
Never loan it out to someone who does not know how to properly use, handle and store it.
A real bad habit is resting them on hard surfaces while working, always have a patch of carpet on the concrete or asphalt if a bench is not handy.
Dial types are more accurate that click types, and over a wider range.
Click types are near useless at or near minimum wrench ratings, the tolerance is huge and there is no repeatability.
Beam types are the least accurate, but will tolerate the most abuse.
If you have a beam or dial type that is a bit short of the needed torque value, say by no more than 15 % and you do not have anything else bigger handy, torque to the wrench limit, then clock the fastener another 10-15 degrees with a flex handle. (you can use a ratchet, but flex handles are longer and give more leverage and control)

mcromo44 is offline  
post #11 of 15 Old 06-11-2011, 03:49 PM
LIVE FOR THE PROCESS
 
Nesty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: CBus!
Posts: 653
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Donation 
Total Awards: 1

I have a crapsman beam bender and then bought a nice strap-on that breaks at the desired torque on ebay. The calibration, though, is prohibitively expensive (~$90, every time I accost a snap-on guy in a parking lot). Periodically, I will use the beam bender to get close, then finish with the snap-on to confirm it is still in the ballpark.

Nesty is offline  
post #12 of 15 Old 06-11-2011, 06:33 PM
McTavish
 
mcromo44's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Calgary
Posts: 5,656
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nesty View Post
I have a crapsman beam bender and then bought a nice strap-on that breaks at the desired torque on ebay. The calibration, though, is prohibitively expensive (~$90, every time I accost a snap-on guy in a parking lot). Periodically, I will use the beam bender to get close, then finish with the snap-on to confirm it is still in the ballpark.
Interesting point.
Up here, recalibration of a click type is a touch over $ 100 from Snap-On.
So if one is suspicious of their Craftman click wrench, a new wrench is pretty much the same as a check/recalibration.
Maybe there is a recalibration place I have not found and is less, I really should check that out.

mcromo44 is offline  
post #13 of 15 Old 06-11-2011, 09:06 PM
BrokeRecord
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: West Monroe,La
Posts: 1,180
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Donation Donation Donation 
Total Awards: 3

I have the Park TW1/4" for my bicycle work. I bought a cheap clicker 3/8" yrs ago, but, never use it. A Craftman 1/2" beam does my bike and car work.
Twenty yrs ago I bought a very expensive looking antique torque wrench from a flea market. You set the pointer to the lbs and when the beam bent it made contact with a small light and the light flashed at the set lbs. No tellings how old this fine lil piece of history is.

[
brokerecord is offline  
post #14 of 15 Old 06-12-2011, 04:24 PM
The chill Moderator
 
07919Dave's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: COS:CO
Posts: 3,304
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Veteran 
Total Awards: 1

Haha funny enough in this months MC there is a small section on page 113 about Torque Wrenches. Everything we have said on here is in it. Also a few things on 919s in it as well.

Never Trade the Thrills of Living for the Security of Existence.
07919Dave is offline  
post #15 of 15 Old 06-14-2011, 06:35 AM
Tirone
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: indiana
Posts: 43
Rep Power: 1
 
Where I work, the cheapest torque wrench they allow you to buy is a Snap-On (but not Blue-Point) and they are calibrated every six months. So far over a three year period neither my Snap-On torque wrenches or my Craftsman (which they allow me to have because I had it before they started the policy) have ever been out of calibration or needed any type of adjustment. But I would not trust any harbor freight tool for accuracy or strength.

sburton6 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Wrist Twisters forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome