Torque Wrench Recs? - Wrist Twisters
 1Likes
  • 1 Post By mcromo44
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 40 Old 12-19-2012, 12:34 PM Thread Starter
Immune
 
bocomomark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Missouri
Posts: 312
Rep Power: 1
 
Torque Wrench Recs?

I'm looking for a small click style wrench for the lower end of the scale (Already have a wrench for doing head bolts and the like) And was just wondering if anyone out there had any reccomendations? Cheap does not necessarily scare me, as my 20 year old "auto zone" wrench is a $20 wrench, and each time I've checked it, it's been dead on (thus twarting my attempts to upgrade!).

bocomomark is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 40 Old 12-19-2012, 12:38 PM
Le So Cal Troll
 
nd4spdbh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: So Cal
Posts: 5,766
Rep Power: 1
 
i know others will highly disagree.... but my 1/4in and 1/2in harbor freight torque wrenches have never failed me. from stuff down to 2ftbls to stuff all the way to 200 they have never caused any problems with under or over torquing something.

just as with any clicker type tq wrench... undo the spring all the way every time you use it before you put it away.

nd4spdbh is offline  
post #3 of 40 Old 12-19-2012, 01:36 PM
The Cripple
 
Pvster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 8,772
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nd4spdbh View Post
i know others will highly disagree.... but my 1/4in and 1/2in harbor freight torque wrenches have never failed me. from stuff down to 2ftbls to stuff all the way to 200 they have never caused any problems with under or over torquing something.

just as with any clicker type tq wrench... undo the spring all the way every time you use it before you put it away.
This... Hf has a sale right now where you can get torque wrenches for ten bucks!

Pvster is offline  
 
post #4 of 40 Old 12-20-2012, 03:38 AM
(-(-(-(-(- -)-)-)-)-)
 
andrewebay1's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 6,883
Rep Power: 1
 
You mean to tell me HF tools will torque to spec at 20% and 80% of the range? Wish someone had one of those professional calibrating tools to put em to the test.

I bought an old needle type on Amazon. Never needs to be 'unwound' like the the clicker types. Only downside is having to put some back to torquing at the upper end. Not a problem for me but could be for some trying to torque while looking at the scale.

My classified(s):
Nothing at the moment

----------------
------------
---------
------
---
- '96 Race-retired GSXR 750 (Sold)
- '01 RC51 SP1 (Sold)
- '03 919

"Security is mostly a superstition, it does not exist in nature: avoiding danger in the long run is no safer than outright being exposed. Life is either a daring adventure or nothing."-Helen Keller
andrewebay1 is offline  
post #5 of 40 Old 12-20-2012, 03:54 AM
Why's everything on fire?
 
CB700S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Dallas
Posts: 2,361
Rep Power: 1
 
Garage
There's guys at Texas Instruments and Lockheed out here that use those HF torque wrenches. They're calibrated to within 4% at the factory; that's been checked by the calibration machines. They hold their calibration (provided proper treatment and maintenance) as well as most any other clicker type, including some of the rather more expensive ones that come from Sears or Lowes. I have all three of the major sizes and when I took one in to be calibrated at a tool specialist's open house it was already +/- 2% despite being a few years old and having been used a bit.

1986 Honda Nighthawk 700S
2002 Honda 919
CB700S is offline  
post #6 of 40 Old 12-20-2012, 04:09 AM
(-(-(-(-(- -)-)-)-)-)
 
andrewebay1's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 6,883
Rep Power: 1
 
Good to know. Do you know if their micro-torque wrenches are any good? I'm looking for something that'll do under 16lbs proper.

I've been looking at one of those digital attachments that basically turns any regular wrench into a torquer. I forget the name right now. It's marketed for that and calibrating clickers. I figure it's good for keeping luggage to a minimum for long trips and track outings, when you pack more than just the factory tools.

My classified(s):
Nothing at the moment

----------------
------------
---------
------
---
- '96 Race-retired GSXR 750 (Sold)
- '01 RC51 SP1 (Sold)
- '03 919

"Security is mostly a superstition, it does not exist in nature: avoiding danger in the long run is no safer than outright being exposed. Life is either a daring adventure or nothing."-Helen Keller
andrewebay1 is offline  
post #7 of 40 Old 12-20-2012, 04:28 AM
Why's everything on fire?
 
CB700S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Dallas
Posts: 2,361
Rep Power: 1
 
Garage
I have all three sizes, including the 1/4 inch drive one that's measured in inch pounds. They all seem to be calibrated properly within their tolerances.

1986 Honda Nighthawk 700S
2002 Honda 919
CB700S is offline  
post #8 of 40 Old 12-20-2012, 09:58 AM
Le So Cal Troll
 
nd4spdbh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: So Cal
Posts: 5,766
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by andrewebay1 View Post
You mean to tell me HF tools will torque to spec at 20% and 80% of the range? Wish someone had one of those professional calibrating tools to put em to the test.

I bought an old needle type on Amazon. Never needs to be 'unwound' like the the clicker types. Only downside is having to put some back to torquing at the upper end. Not a problem for me but could be for some trying to torque while looking at the scale.

i use my 1/4 in (which as stated is in in lbs) for stuff thats between ~ 2-16ftlbs

then the half inch for stuff thats 20-200 ftlbs.

nd4spdbh is offline  
post #9 of 40 Old 12-20-2012, 10:08 AM
Silent but Deadly
 
jtaylor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Grottoes, VA
Posts: 176
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pvster View Post
This... Hf has a sale right now where you can get torque wrenches for ten bucks!
I pick up one on this deal and it seems to do a fine job. Heck, for 10 bucks it was worth a shot. Not planing on using it for anything the needs to be too precise anyways. Just the routine maintenance.

jtaylor is offline  
post #10 of 40 Old 12-20-2012, 03:55 PM Thread Starter
Immune
 
bocomomark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Missouri
Posts: 312
Rep Power: 1
 
Does anyone have a coupon or the code for the hf wrenches? (Everything I dredge up is expired)

bocomomark is offline  
post #11 of 40 Old 12-20-2012, 05:17 PM
Silent but Deadly
 
jtaylor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Grottoes, VA
Posts: 176
Rep Power: 1
 
Harbor Freight Tools

Third coupon down on the right.

Coupon #70214271

jtaylor is offline  
post #12 of 40 Old 12-20-2012, 06:05 PM
McTavish
 
mcromo44's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Calgary
Posts: 5,999
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CB700S View Post
There's guys at Texas Instruments and Lockheed out here that use those HF torque wrenches. They're calibrated to within 4% at the factory; that's been checked by the calibration machines. They hold their calibration (provided proper treatment and maintenance) as well as most any other clicker type, including some of the rather more expensive ones that come from Sears or Lowes. I have all three of the major sizes and when I took one in to be calibrated at a tool specialist's open house it was already +/- 2% despite being a few years old and having been used a bit.
Generally speaking, click types used below 20 % of the wrenches limit, yield actual torques that can be way over, way under, and are non repeatable.
Short story, stay within 20 and 100 % of the wrench and you'll be OK.
If you want greater accuracy in general, use a dial type.
But a good dial type will buy you a few decent click types.
MOST IMPORTANT
NEVER loan a torque wrench who does not only know how to use it, but will also use it properly.

mcromo44 is offline  
post #13 of 40 Old 12-20-2012, 06:31 PM Thread Starter
Immune
 
bocomomark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Missouri
Posts: 312
Rep Power: 1
 
"Third coupon down on the right."

That's for a 1/2" wrench, a bit burly for me. I'm looking to get a 1/4" and a 3/8" (on the other hand I may pick up the burly wrench also, just cause, I'm a sucker for tools *cough* I mean "who knows when it might come in handy."

bocomomark is offline  
post #14 of 40 Old 12-20-2012, 08:08 PM
Rich
 
RichT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 188
Rep Power: 1
 
While some have had very good experiences with the HF tools, somethings to consider:
* The quality control at their contract manufacturers is probably non-existent.
* The quality can change significantly from lot to lot.
* contract manufacturers are changed all the time in the search for lower overhead

What you get from HF is probably more of a 'crapshoot' than anything else (and guys like lowes, sears, etc probably get their tools from the same factories).

RichT is offline  
post #15 of 40 Old 12-20-2012, 08:54 PM Thread Starter
Immune
 
bocomomark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Missouri
Posts: 312
Rep Power: 1
 
RichT,
Good points, I hadn't originally intended to go as cheap as HF, but for that price I figure I can fuss with them and check them over a bit before putting them into service. (I have access to several known good wrenches to check them against, and also have a good friend who is an engineer for a major airline, and he can probably evaluate them proper) I wasn't going to blindly trust a $10 wrench. Heck, even if it cost $500, I wouldn't trust if it passed through HF's doors...

bocomomark is offline  
post #16 of 40 Old 12-21-2012, 12:26 PM
Tirone
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Pismo Beach
Posts: 61
Rep Power: 1
 
I was at sears over the weekend and they had Craftsman 3/8 and 1/2 torque wrenches, usually 80 bucks - on sale for 39.99.
If you wanted to go a high-quality route.

ScramblerX is offline  
post #17 of 40 Old 12-21-2012, 08:12 PM
Why's everything on fire?
 
CB700S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Dallas
Posts: 2,361
Rep Power: 1
 
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScramblerX View Post
I was at sears over the weekend and they had Craftsman 3/8 and 1/2 torque wrenches, usually 80 bucks - on sale for 39.99.
If you wanted to go a high-quality route.
Those are the 'new' ones made in China. The plastic handle assemblies fall apart.

The HF ones are made in Taiwan.

1986 Honda Nighthawk 700S
2002 Honda 919
CB700S is offline  
post #18 of 40 Old 12-21-2012, 08:18 PM
(-(-(-(-(- -)-)-)-)-)
 
andrewebay1's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 6,883
Rep Power: 1
 
Taiwan's QC is much better.

I'm sure the Craftsman has a lifetime warranty, for $40 and a warranty claim they're still ahead. Lol

My classified(s):
Nothing at the moment

----------------
------------
---------
------
---
- '96 Race-retired GSXR 750 (Sold)
- '01 RC51 SP1 (Sold)
- '03 919

"Security is mostly a superstition, it does not exist in nature: avoiding danger in the long run is no safer than outright being exposed. Life is either a daring adventure or nothing."-Helen Keller
andrewebay1 is offline  
post #19 of 40 Old 12-22-2012, 07:35 AM
Brain stolen again?
 
Bigdaa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Goleta, California
Posts: 17,432
Rep Power: 1
 
Jeeze, if you are going to go cheap don't scream when you make a setting and find you have overtorqued by 50%.

Harbor freight stuff is shit!


Craftsman is OK.

You want accuracy, go Snap On or Matco Tools. These4 are pricey, but when you dial in 100 in-lbs, that's pretty much what you get and not 46 in-lbs instead.

I bought a 1/2 in drive Harbor Freight piece of shit along with a 3/8. The metrology department where I worked tried to calibrate the 3/8' piece of shit, told me it was impossible, and that this thing shouldn't be used except for a breaker bar.

I threw away the 3/8 and I use the big 1/2 drive for busting loose big bolts and nuts.

Good to great tools never fade away.

I said I never had much use for one.
Never said I didn't know how to use it."
Mathew Quigley
Bigdaa is offline  
post #20 of 40 Old 12-22-2012, 09:27 AM
Pierre-Marc
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Granite Falls
Posts: 556
Rep Power: 1
 
^+1...agree 100% with Bigdaa. you get what you pay for. I work in the aviation industry where everything is torqued, even oil filters. We depend
on our torque wrenches to be accurate and are required to have them checked and recalibrated, if necessary, annually. Expensive wrenches
need adjustment now and then, even if they are taken care of and handled
correctly. Just my

mx463 is offline  
post #21 of 40 Old 12-22-2012, 06:53 PM
Milites Gregarius
 
Boskru's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Fort Worth
Posts: 107
Rep Power: 1
 
For what its worth, Sears has a big sale on right now and I saw their torque wrenches discounted. I've had a Craftsman torque wrench for a few years and its a decent wrench!

Boskru is offline  
post #22 of 40 Old 12-23-2012, 07:19 AM
McTavish
 
mcromo44's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Calgary
Posts: 5,999
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigdaa View Post
Jeeze, if you are going to go cheap don't scream when you make a setting and find you have overtorqued by 50%.

Harbor freight stuff is shit!


Craftsman is OK.

You want accuracy, go Snap On or Matco Tools. These4 are pricey, but when you dial in 100 in-lbs, that's pretty much what you get and not 46 in-lbs instead.

I bought a 1/2 in drive Harbor Freight piece of shit along with a 3/8. The metrology department where I worked tried to calibrate the 3/8' piece of shit, told me it was impossible, and that this thing shouldn't be used except for a breaker bar.

I threw away the 3/8 and I use the big 1/2 drive for busting loose big bolts and nuts.

Good to great tools never fade away.
And my guess is the HF 3/8 your Metrology dep't tried to calibrate, either had stickers or some documentation showing is as being ISO and ANSI conformant, and maybe also a calibration certificate.

What do you think about Proto ?
I'm eyeing a J6006C which is a 16-80 ft lb range. (not the F which is 10-80)
ANSI B107.14M, +/- 3% clockwise and 6% counterclockwise (for any left hand threads that I have none of)

mcromo44 is offline  
post #23 of 40 Old 12-23-2012, 07:52 AM
Immune
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: East TN
Posts: 375
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by andrewebay1 View Post
Taiwan's QC is much better.

I'm sure the Craftsman has a lifetime warranty, for $40 and a warranty claim they're still ahead. Lol
No way. Their torque wrenches have never carried a lifetime warranty.

BKRMON is offline  
post #24 of 40 Old 12-23-2012, 08:24 AM
McTavish
 
mcromo44's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Calgary
Posts: 5,999
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BKRMON View Post
No way. Their torque wrenches have never carried a lifetime warranty.
I'm not sure what you meant, but I'll comment that Lifetime Warranties have less than zero to do with the accuracy of torque wrenches.
My guess is that 99.9 % of the click torque wrenches that rest in tool boxes are used by people that are 100% trusting of the wrench setting while having zero evidence of the device's accuracy.

mcromo44 is offline  
post #25 of 40 Old 12-23-2012, 02:20 PM
Milites Gregarius
 
Boskru's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Fort Worth
Posts: 107
Rep Power: 1
 
Most torque wrenches only have a year or two warranty. This just covers mechanical defects and NOT the calibration accuracy of the wrench itself. I had mine for work (aircraft mechanic) and it had to calibrated every year or else it could not be used.

Boskru is offline  
post #26 of 40 Old 12-24-2012, 06:26 AM
Princeps Prior
 
redline919's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Cincinnati
Posts: 1,894
Rep Power: 1
 
Where or how can I check my torque wrenches? I have the HF 1/4 in new and a Snap on 3/8 click style. I'm doing head gaskets on my Xterra and I don't trust my tools. Any suggestions?

redline919 is offline  
post #27 of 40 Old 12-24-2012, 07:49 AM
Brain stolen again?
 
Bigdaa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Goleta, California
Posts: 17,432
Rep Power: 1
 
Proto is good, too!
They have some very nice stuff. The kind of stuff that if the mechanic sees you borrowing from his roll away, you get your fingers busted.

They were the tools we used in the aerospace and military contracts I was involved in back 6 years ago.

I said I never had much use for one.
Never said I didn't know how to use it."
Mathew Quigley
Bigdaa is offline  
post #28 of 40 Old 12-24-2012, 08:57 AM
McTavish
 
mcromo44's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Calgary
Posts: 5,999
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigdaa View Post
Proto is good, too!
They have some very nice stuff. The kind of stuff that if the mechanic sees you borrowing from his roll away, you get your fingers busted.

They were the tools we used in the aerospace and military contracts I was involved in back 6 years ago.
Thanks for the feedback on Proto.
( I still have my Proto Challenger series sockets and wrenches from the mid 70s. At that time, SnapOn, Mac and Proto were the serious stuff. I couldn't afford it. But Proto had the Challenger line that was something like half the pro stuff price, but only a bit more than cheap stuff like Husky but twice as good.)

mcromo44 is offline  
post #29 of 40 Old 12-29-2012, 02:51 PM
Tirone
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Rio Rancho
Posts: 7
Rep Power: 1
 
Cornwell, again expensive just like Snap-on and the other high end tool suppliers. I'm not a huge fan of HF, some stuff seems good other stuff crap. If its made in Taiwan it is probably good quality, China items are crap. Older Sears stuff high quality the new stuff is being referred too as Crapsman for a reason, they sold out.
Proto, Cornwell, Thorsen, Snap-on, Armstrong, MAC, Matco, Vulcan---- most of the old school industrial suppliers all still make the best. I made friends with the Cornwell tool truck here in NM. He has a tester and I can verify all my wrenches anytime I see him. I repair motorcycles and cars as a hobby. some expensive Harleys, BMW's and Ducati's pass through my part-time shop. I cannot afford to have a cheap/inaccurate tool in my boxes. You paid a lot of bucks for your bike in general and one thing I do know is replacement parts are all out of proportion to the cost of a bike. One stripped out spark plug or drain plug can quickly piss through a few hundred bucks if not thousands of dollars. The older beam type are not as bad as I and lots of others once thought. I have one old sears beam type 3/8" drive that is as accurate as any of the click type we all love. I just checked my boxes and I have 9 torque wrenches at present (Cownwell, Proto, Snap-on, Sears) the Sears is the only beam type. I have a few screwdriver type with a torque dial for inch/lb applications a 1/4 inch, (2) 3/8 inch (5) 1/2 drive and can reach 350ft/lb at the high end. Critical items to remember: Clean, dry or oiled threads (as specified) are critical for accurate torque values. This means the mating threads as well, don't know how many times I see people clean the bolts then drop them into a dirty mating hole. Use a thread chaser or modified tap and insure the holes are just as clean! High temp anti-sieze on plugs is a must (exhaust flange bolts as well). Loctite is your friend learn which types to use for the application and apply as needed, it helps lubricate the threads during torque and prevents movement during temp cycles.

ggrimes2 is offline  
post #30 of 40 Old 12-29-2012, 03:21 PM
Tirone
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Rio Rancho
Posts: 7
Rep Power: 1
 
I quit the first post a bit soon. The point I was making about how you treat the fasteners and the holes is just a critical as the best torque wrench. For proper torque you must have clean fasteners and clean threads in the mating surface. In addition I also use a small amount of grease/oil under the bolt heads before I start the party. If washers are present the apply a bit of lube to prevent binding when you're torquing a fastener. Smooth, when applying torque NEVER jerk or pull a fastener down quickly. If its a critical area (valve cover, timing chain cover, cyl head, clutch, etc>.) then torque the item in 2-3 passes. Pre-torque, mid-range & final value: if you pull a fastener down to the proper value then the next you are rising warpage of damage of a gasket.
Is it tight enough??? When you do all the proper cleaning and prep and have small fasteners it often feels like you did not tighten then down enough. The Harley primary cover and the Kawasaki clutch covers are prime examples of this. Very small screws and thin gaskets, very easy to overtorque. Trust your torque wrench and use a bit of Loctite Purple (low strength) to insure the fastners stay in place. I can't remember the number? 242 is medium strength (blue) good for midsized fasteners and 271 is high strength (red) which most of you should never use or need w/o professional help. Fasteners on the Jap bikes is equal to US and Euro products nowdays. Some of the bikes I see from the 60's and 70's in not the same. Older bikes had a lot of phillips style fasteners which easily stripped or rounded. I have the impact driver as the aid in removal. Unless the customer wants all original I usually replace these crap fasteners with new Stainless Steel Socket Head items. Cheap steel fasteners on the old bikes seem to corrode up and "mate" remember the white powder you see when you finally get that bolt out? This is corrosion caused by dissimilar metals some water and age. During reassembly I clean out the threads and remove all the corrosion. I've tried oil, grease and or loctite as a barrier. Loctite seems to help but you cannot cover all the threads and excessive loctite creates problems all its own. Oil and grease help prevent the corrosion but they tend to dribble out or make a mess later and my customers as a rule are pretty picky. Lately I have been wiping the threads with Rectorseal #5 a pipe dope which does not impact aluminum, drys semi-hard so bolts do not come loose and seems to do a good job of preventing corrosion. Stainless steel fasteners do not corrode and as a substitute work well since if you choose a better head type (versus the phillips) you run less risk of having problems next time you perform work.

ggrimes2 is offline  
post #31 of 40 Old 12-29-2012, 03:32 PM
Tirone
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Rio Rancho
Posts: 7
Rep Power: 1
 
Visit your tool guy. Most of the Snap-on trucks have a tester if he won't let you check your wrenches move on. The plan is simple for them even the HF wrench should be verified, if it's bad then he gets the business of selling you a new one. I currently purchase mostly Cornwell tools and he will verify all my wrenches anytime he drops by. He feels that it is just good business as I purchase most of my tools from him and the service really costs him nothing. I have a part time shop in my backyard so he only drops by when I call him. another idea is if you have any friends who work a a shop or dealer, lots of those folks can get the items checked for free.

ggrimes2 is offline  
post #32 of 40 Old 12-30-2012, 08:32 AM
Brain stolen again?
 
Bigdaa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Goleta, California
Posts: 17,432
Rep Power: 1
 
I forgot Cornwell.

That's very good pro stuff right there. Thanks, new guy.

I said I never had much use for one.
Never said I didn't know how to use it."
Mathew Quigley
Bigdaa is offline  
post #33 of 40 Old 12-30-2012, 02:42 PM
Optio
 
touring919's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: OH
Posts: 917
Rep Power: 1
 
Craftsman is crap! They do not have the same warranty that their other hand tools have. They are not lifetime.

Snap on is good. Tonichi is the cats ass. But those things cost a mint.

I prefer dial or bar style wrenches. Except for torquing lug nuts. Clicker all the way for that. Its ttoo much of a pain to read the dial while bent over holding 80 or so ftlbs on the wrench. The only real draw back to th dial/bar style wrench is that they do not have a racheting mechanism.

02 919 (RIP)
07 600RR
07 CRF450X
81 XS850
09 Versys
touring919 is offline  
post #34 of 40 Old 01-10-2013, 07:43 PM
Milites Gregarius
 
trailblazer68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 110
Rep Power: 1
 
I'm a mechanic myself and I've got both a 1/4" and the 1/2" torque wrenches from HF most of my tools are HF. you can get junk there but if you stick to the PITTSBURGH tools your quality is in upper class. All Pittsburgh tools are lifetime warranty, made in Taiwan. I've yet to break a single Pittsburgh tool except for one 3/8" ratchet, which quick being selectable for some reason or other. I've broken more snapon tools than Pittsburgh. When I was at the local wyotech trade school I had both my torque wrenchs calibrated, both were within +-2% and advertised at +-4%. I use these tools regularly and as of yet they've only needed minor and I mean very minor adjustment over the past 3yrs. I calibrate them every 6 months if I can. In the first 2 yrs neither needed any adjustment.


Now I like mac matco proto and snapon tools just fine. But I hate the prices lol. I've gone to HF over and over and if you pickup a tool, and It feels cheap move on. Use your common sense. Yes they sell cheap tools, but I know a guy who refuses to buy anything else for impact sockets. In 15 yrs of wrenching 5 days a week he has never split a HF impact socket.

Snapon wrenches have the best size fit I've come across but HF 's PITTSBURGH wrenches are so close as to not even matter. If my PITTSBURGH tools can't do it, its very rare that a snapon can do any better.I bought a $70 1/2" impact gun rated at 700ftlbs. And the only gun that can touch it in our shop is one guys 1000ftlbs rated snapon. (Bluepoint whatever).

Use common sense when buying your tools. For me HF is close, if I ever do break a tool I walk in grab a new one and walk out end of story. No waiting a week for your truck to show up. The price can't be beat. Even there US GENERAL toolboxes are great quality. Better than craftsman. Heavier than craftsman and cheaper than craftsman. They are built just as strong as the big brands. No one believes me when I say I only paid $300 for mine (the smaller set) new. Its that good a quality.

So choose what you like, but look around. See what fits your budget and situation best. Remember that almost every mechanic has more than one brand in his his box and only the well off or the diehard brand fans don't.

trailblazer68 is offline  
post #35 of 40 Old 01-10-2013, 07:47 PM
Milites Gregarius
 
trailblazer68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 110
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by touring919 View Post
Craftsman is crap! They do not have the same warranty that their other hand tools have. They are not lifetime.

Snap on is good. Tonichi is the cats ass. But those things cost a mint.

I prefer dial or bar style wrenches. Except for torquing lug nuts. Clicker all the way for that. Its ttoo much of a pain to read the dial while bent over holding 80 or so ftlbs on the wrench. The only real draw back to th dial/bar style wrench is that they do not have a racheting mechanism.
I have a snapon adapter I found, for these types of wrenches that acts as a ratchet mech. Its even reversible! If your interested I could send it to you as I have no use for it.

trailblazer68 is offline  
post #36 of 40 Old 10-04-2013, 05:29 PM
McTavish
 
mcromo44's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Calgary
Posts: 5,999
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcromo44 View Post
I'm not sure what you meant, but I'll comment that Lifetime Warranties have less than zero to do with the accuracy of torque wrenches.
My guess is that 99.9 % of the click torque wrenches that rest in tool boxes are used by people that are 100% trusting of the wrench setting while having zero evidence of the device's accuracy.
I finally got around to buying the Proto J6006C I've had on my "get list" for some months now.
It's categorized as a ASME B107.14M-1994 wrench, meaning +/- 3 % accuracy of reading for 20 to 100 % of scale in the clockwise direction. It's a 80 ft/lb limit wrench, so the range of accuracy is from 16 to 80. The wrench goes down to 10, but that's a waste, and what a danger, as it's outside the accuracy band.
Each torque wrench is serial numbered and comes with a hand noted test card.
VERY INTERESTING TEST RESULTS for what is only supposed to be a 3 % accuracy torque wrench.
@ 20 % ,accuracy was only out by a factor of 1.0019
@ 60 % , accuracy was only out by a factor of 1.0104
@ 100%, accuracy was only out by a factor of 1.0063
So when one converts the factors to percent error, they are but a fraction of the allowable 3 %.
Interestingly enough, the Counterclockwise accuracy was way lower than 6 % through the full range, never more than 3 %.
Short story, a very accurate torque wrench for the price. (I paid regular price 185 CDN before tax @ KMS Tools)
The J6 range covers a broad range of ratings from low to high.
Good instructions as well.
Don't laugh at that.
It's mind boggling how many don't realize that A) storing a click type torque wrench that has not be zeroed out to its minimum results in bogus readings the next time you use it, and B) for maximum accuracy, set the wrench to it's limit, and take it to "click" at least 3 times before you start using it - particularly for wrenches used infrequently.

mcromo44 is offline  
post #37 of 40 Old 12-26-2016, 03:15 PM
McTavish
 
mcromo44's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Calgary
Posts: 5,999
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcromo44 View Post
I finally got around to buying the Proto J6006C I've had on my "get list" for some months now.
It's categorized as a ASME B107.14M-1994 wrench, meaning +/- 3 % accuracy of reading for 20 to 100 % of scale in the clockwise direction. It's a 80 ft/lb limit wrench, so the range of accuracy is from 16 to 80. The wrench goes down to 10, but that's a waste, and what a danger, as it's outside the accuracy band.
Each torque wrench is serial numbered and comes with a hand noted test card.
VERY INTERESTING TEST RESULTS for what is only supposed to be a 3 % accuracy torque wrench.
@ 20 % ,accuracy was only out by a factor of 1.0019
@ 60 % , accuracy was only out by a factor of 1.0104
@ 100%, accuracy was only out by a factor of 1.0063
So when one converts the factors to percent error, they are but a fraction of the allowable 3 %.
Interestingly enough, the Counterclockwise accuracy was way lower than 6 % through the full range, never more than 3 %.
Short story, a very accurate torque wrench for the price. (I paid regular price 185 CDN before tax @ KMS Tools)
The J6 range covers a broad range of ratings from low to high.
Good instructions as well.
Don't laugh at that.
It's mind boggling how many don't realize that A) storing a click type torque wrench that has not be zeroed out to its minimum results in bogus readings the next time you use it, and B) for maximum accuracy, set the wrench to it's limit, and take it to "click" at least 3 times before you start using it - particularly for wrenches used infrequently.
Thread resurrected because of the repeated references to torque wrenches in the current thread on 919 oil sump drain bolt access.

Also, the previous post in this thread has some interesting info re data found on torque wrench QA test cards. I don't know if Harbour Freight T' W's have test cards or not, but if they do, an interesting comparison could be made.

mcromo44 is offline  
post #38 of 40 Old 12-29-2016, 09:21 AM
LDH
Test Rider
 
LDH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: by the ocean
Posts: 4,474
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Trackday Recognition Referral Award 
Total Awards: 2

My thoughts:

Cheap Low End Torque Wrenches might be fairly accurate during a one-off test, but you don't know how consistent they are across an entire production run or how well they fare over time. Do they lose their calibration and get weak after months or years of use? Most do in my experience. If the task at hand is critical enough to warrant the use of a Torque Wrench then you better be using a good one not some made in Chaiwan crap if the task isn't that critical then do it by hand and shut the hell up about your cheap ass torque wrench.

Basically & I have said this many times before... Torque wrenches are for inside the motor and stuff outside the motor is done to feel. I have cited many instances where if you use the torque specs in the service manual you get issues with binding on various parts like bearing collars on axles etc.

The specs in the service manual for axles and pinch bolts etc are there for liability purposes on a lot of those things and there are a lot of variables with quality control and fitment of the components you are wrenching on that are not very consistent when it comes to those parts outside the motor. They do not take into account bolt stretch, leftover loc-tite residue, anti-seize or even just grease and lube

For the record sometimes even inside the motor presents a challenge for consistency when you have vehicles being mass produced on an assembly line, but outside parts all over the place in that regard even from bike to bike down the same line.

I don't do much motor work anymore and never liked doing it to begin with, but another area where torque specs are VERY important is suspension especially on the high end aftermarket stuff like the Ohlins I service. Where specs are measured in Newtonmeters and need to be adhered to. In this case I use CDI brand Torque Wrenches. This is the manufacturer that brands for Snap-On, but half the price without the Snap-On logo on them... They have a myriad of functions built-in and change from ft/bs, in/lbs and Nm with the touch of a button. All of which I have to do in the assembly of just one cart kit in an OEM fork leg.

https://www.amazon.com/CDI-1002CF3-C...mjybARSNK3N_tt


Again just my views on the subject.

LDH is offline  
post #39 of 40 Old 12-29-2016, 04:11 PM
Aquilifer
 
rpcraft's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Dallas
Posts: 1,128
Rep Power: 1
 
2 weeks ago I was flamed for recommending HF as a budget alternative, lol. That being said, I still recommend the HF 1/4 torque wrench if you have no spare money, but if you can't find it in yourself to trust that then I'd also recommend the 1/4 torque wrench made by Tekton (You can find them off Amazon.com).

I can vouch for the Tekton appearing to be a good quality clicker. I have compared it to my older craftsman 1/4 torque wrench from bolt to bolt and it seems on par when it comes to accuracy. I got the second one because sometimes I'll have several different fasteners on a project that have a first and second torque ratings and its easier to not have to constantly change them across the project.

Rob C

88 Blue Hawk (NT650) Project Pics - http://tinyurl.com/clw8h3q
2000 DL650 - Being ridden but make me an offer if interested...
2002 DL1000 V-Strom
rpcraft is offline  
post #40 of 40 Old 12-29-2016, 04:53 PM
McTavish
 
mcromo44's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Calgary
Posts: 5,999
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LDH View Post

I use CDI brand Torque Wrenches. This is the manufacturer that brands for Snap-On, but half the price without the Snap-On logo on them... They have a myriad of functions built-in and change from ft/bs, in/lbs and Nm with the touch of a button. All of which I have to do in the assembly of just one cart kit in an OEM fork leg.

https://www.amazon.com/CDI-1002CF3-C...mjybARSNK3N_tt

I hadn't heard of CDI before let alone fact they supply Snap-On.
I used the link.
I see they also have versions that also display clocking values (degrees of rotation instead of torque values).
LDH likes this.

mcromo44 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Wrist Twisters forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome