Too soon for synthetic blend oil? - Wrist Twisters
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post #1 of 69 Old 11-20-2008, 07:08 PM Thread Starter
 
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Too soon for synthetic blend oil?

Hi all,

Almost 4000 miles on my 919 I bought new exactly two months ago. Dealer did the 600 mile service, they changed the oil using Golden Spectro (?). Immediately the shifting seemed rougher. Is it ok to switch to a blended oil with this many miles?

Thank you.

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post #2 of 69 Old 11-20-2008, 07:30 PM
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No do not switch yet. Wait until atleast 8k miles. Drain the cheap crap and get some good regular oil. Honda black bottle was good for my friends bike when he had low miles. I used honda gold bottle partial synthetic for 2 oil changes. I am now using Amsoil synthetic oil, but I also have 26k miles

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post #3 of 69 Old 11-20-2008, 07:50 PM
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i am just shy of 4000... and i changed to repsol blended.. i like it so far... i don't know if i will ever go full synthetic..



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post #4 of 69 Old 11-20-2008, 07:54 PM
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I use semi-synthetic. I like it. I did not switch till around 5,000 miles though. Not sure what everyone's ideas are about the best time to switch, but I am sure there's a few opinions around that may be some help to you...


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post #5 of 69 Old 11-20-2008, 08:04 PM
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what's the reasoning behind x amount of miles before changing types?

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post #6 of 69 Old 11-20-2008, 08:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beefsalad View Post
what's the reasoning behind x amount of miles before changing types?
I wonder the same thing. I've heard valve seals need to seat correctly in dino oil first. I don't know that I buy the hype. My 06 tacoma came stock with 50/50 blend and at 20K miles I switched to full. My 9er just went full repsol syn @ 6K.

I cant say I have any 1st hand experience but I have heard no ill effects of switching before a magic mileage.

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post #7 of 69 Old 11-20-2008, 09:44 PM
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Just change it.
By 4000 miles your rings are seated, valves don't matter, & all is fine.
Remember, The Corvette comes factory filled with Mobil-1 at zero miles.

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post #8 of 69 Old 11-21-2008, 04:24 AM
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post #9 of 69 Old 11-21-2008, 05:22 AM
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like zookmor, im using amsoil, switched it out at 3000, im just at 5000 now, also, was 18 degrees this morning here, no odd noises, its all good





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post #10 of 69 Old 11-21-2008, 06:05 AM
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Here's the deal as I understand it. Full Synth oils are so good engines don't breakin very well. You need some wear to take the rough edges off which happens for the most part in the first 30 or so minutes of run time. As heat cycles occure some very minor shape changes happen but stablize quickly. Vettes, vipers, BMWs, and lots off other cars come with full synthetic from the factory because the engines are spun up on a machine to check oil pressure, compression, and a host of other things. This combined with modern manufactoring methods reduces needed breakin. I don't know about Honda bike engines being spun at the factory. I use full synth Repsol. Oil changes are expensive but the bike shifts best with that brand. Yes I have tried others but the Repsol just rides the best for me.

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post #11 of 69 Old 11-21-2008, 06:12 AM
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Repsol for me too...


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post #12 of 69 Old 11-21-2008, 06:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bike#9 View Post
Hi all,

Almost 4000 miles on my 919 I bought new exactly two months ago. Dealer did the 600 mile service, they changed the oil using Golden Spectro (?). Immediately the shifting seemed rougher. Is it ok to switch to a blended oil with this many miles?

Thank you.
You're fine ... do it.

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post #13 of 69 Old 11-21-2008, 06:19 AM
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There are a few bikes that come from the factory day one with full synthetic, MV Agusta's for example. I'm not sure, but I think there are Aprilia's and Triumph's that come with either a partial or full syn from day one. This is always a big argument amongst the ZX10 folks, because sometimes a full synthetic is linked to clutch problems. So, I have always gone with a blend for two reasons. First, no clutch problems reported with the blends. Second, in a pinch you can mix a blend either direction.

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post #14 of 69 Old 11-21-2008, 06:23 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sike View Post
There are a few bikes that come from the factory day one with full synthetic, MV Agusta's for example. I'm not sure, but I think there are Aprilia's and Triumph's that come with either a partial or full syn from day one. This is always a big argument amongst the ZX10 folks, because sometimes a full synthetic is linked to clutch problems. So, I have always gone with a blend for two reasons. First, no clutch problems reported with the blends. Second, in a pinch you can mix a blend either direction.
Your correct, Aprilia RSV-R and Tuonos are started for the first time ever with full synthetic Agip oil in it - IM not sure about the other brands though - I can say though all the air cooeld Ducatis come with a Dino based and are switched to full synthetic @ the 600 mile service, so, if a air/oil cooled Ducati and Aprilias are synthetic from the factory or switched to @ 600 miles, why would this hurt a Honda ? Arent they better bikes ?

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post #15 of 69 Old 11-21-2008, 06:55 AM
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I changed to AMSOIL Synthetic Motorcycle at 2600 miles, in other words, at the bike's 3rd oil change.
No problems, quieted engine noise, improved shifting, sounds like it's revving freer, etc.
+1


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post #16 of 69 Old 11-21-2008, 07:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vtwin996rider View Post
Repsol for me too...
+1

Full syn

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post #17 of 69 Old 11-21-2008, 07:52 AM
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Synthetic Oil Explained

Whether it's evil stuff or good stuff depends on who you talk to. And a lot of what you hear from backyard mechanics is rumor and myth. Myth # 1 is the claim that you don't have to change Synthetic oil as often as regular motor oil. Remember when Mobil 1 said you could go 25,000 miles between oil changes with synthetic oil? Notice they haven't said that for a good number of years? Keep that thought on the back burner for now... Myth #2 is that synthetic oil causes oil leaks. In this article I'm going to try to dispell these myths for you with the cold hard facts about the differences and similarities between dino vs. synthetic oil.

Let's talk first about what "dino" oil is (Dino is short for Dinosaur, which is when it started forming). Dino oil is created from something called "Base Stock". Base stock what the oil companies get after they have processed the crude oil that comes from the ground. From there, additives are combined with the Base Stock, to create our motor oil. There are 7 main additives which include anti-foaming agents, anti-corrosion, etc, etc. At the molecular level, dino oil contains molecules of varying sizes. Imagine the floor of a gymnasium covered with basketballs, baseballs, volleyballs, and beach balls. Now imagine that all those different size "balls" are moving around, flowing past the floor. Every time a ball surface contacts the floor surface, the ball absorbs heat from the floor. That is how oil removes heat from your engine components, from surface to surface contact.
Now imagine the same gymnasium floor covered in uniformly sized golf balls. Smaller, more uniform molecules can absorb more heat from a surface, because there are more of them AND they have a larger surface to volume ratio which means they have more surface area contact. That's what synthetic oil is. A man-made "Base Stock", where all the molecules are the same size, and smaller than those in dino oil. Better heat transfer, better lubricating properties, and a lot wider temperature range without breakdown, are now obtained.
Myth #1 debunked
Oil does not break down under normal use. This is true of both dino and synth oil and is also the reason why you take oil to the Recycling Center and not the trash dump. So if oil itself doesn't ever degrade, why do we have to change it? The answer is twofold: additives and contamination. It will probably surprise you to learn that synthetic oil has all the same additives that dino oil has! The additives in oil DO break down, which is part of what necessitates oil changes. The other reason for regular oil changes is that with use, motor oil becomes contaminated (dirt, water, acids, etc). Using synthetic oil does not protect against either of these problems, which is why you CANNOT go further between oil changes when running a synthetic. You should still change your synthetic oil at the same intervals as you do with dino oil. Anyone want to guess how many claims Mobil 1 had to pay to people that were going 25,000 miles between changes?
Myth #2 debunked
Synthetic oil causing oil leaks is another commonly spread myth. The truth of the matter is that if all your engine seals and gaskets are in good condition, synthetic oil will NOT leak in your engine. The myth started because on occasion, an engine will leak with synthetic oil, but not dino oil. The reason for this is that the smaller molecules of the synthetic are able to get past very small crevices, where the larger molecules of dino oil cannot. But this does not mean that the synthetic oil has caused the leak, it simply has "discovered" an infant leak, and regardless of what oil you are running, this infant leak will eventually grow to a size that will allow dino oil to occupy and pass also. Synthetic oil has not been shown to deteriorate engine seals or gaskets. It is not some evil solvent that will break down sealant, or anything like that. Like was said earlier, it is just a man-made base stock, that is uniform and smaller in molecule size than dino oil. Nothing more, nothing less.

ADVANTAGES OF RUNNING SYNTHETIC OIL in AIRCOOLED ENGINES
So if you are asking yourself "What's the point of running synthetic oil, if you can't change it less often?" Here's your answer in a nutshell.

Since synthetic oil has better heat transfer qualities than dino oil, your internal engine temperatures will be lower. Things like bearings, especially, will not operate at as high of a temperature as a result. The wider range of temperatures that synthetic oil can withstand is well suited for the air-cooled VW engine. With head temperatures normally between 300-350 degrees, synthetic will not breakdown while lubricating the valvetrain components at the heads. The better lubricating properties of synthetic in general will lead to a longer engine life as well. On average, when synthetic oil is run in an air-cooled VW engine, head temperatures stay the same, but engine oil temps reduce by anywhere from 10 to 15 degrees. This is in engines that have all the correct cooling tin in place, and are not suffering from overheating to begin with. Important note: Do not run synthetic to fix a hot running engine. Find the real reason it's running hot, and fix it!

Another benefit is that since synthetic oil is man-made, it can be tailored to suit a wider range of needs. Synthetic oil is now being made is such weights as 5w50, and 0w30, weights that are not possible to achieve with dino oils.

At Aircooled.Net we recommend that you run synthetic oils in all cases, with one exception: you should continue to run dino oil (and change it every 1k miles) if your car still has the stock oiling system.
In transmissions we can not praise synthetics enough; RUN IT, especially if you live somewhere that gets cold (under 30F/0C).
There is one thing I need to clarify though -- if you are not running an oil filter, there really is no point to using synthetic since your oil is going to become contaminated very quickly. Your engine will still benefit somewhat from it, but due to the higher cost of synthetic oil, the gain of running it before it becomes contaminated is negligible. Oil change intervals range from 1000-3000 miles in the VW engine with a strainer (not a filter). VWoM (Mexico) recommends 1k mile intervals on non-filtered engines; keep this in mind for your pride and joy! But on the flip side, the stock VW engine only takes 2.5 qts anyways, it's not going to break you if you do want to run synthetic!

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post #18 of 69 Old 11-21-2008, 12:32 PM
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All the new Triumphs run Triumph Mobil 1 from the get go from the factory. The manual calls for full sythetic for my first oil change coming up.
I had good luck running Repsol Sythetic from the 700 mile mark in my Honda.


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post #19 of 69 Old 11-21-2008, 01:39 PM
 
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I changed to Honda (black) full synthetic at 600 mi. Running fine!

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post #20 of 69 Old 11-21-2008, 02:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Naked/SS View Post
All the new Triumphs run Triumph Mobil 1 from the get go from the factory. The manual calls for full sythetic for my first oil change coming up.
I had good luck running Repsol Sythetic from the 700 mile mark in my Honda.
just forgot to mix in the "deer repellant"



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post #21 of 69 Old 11-22-2008, 03:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xrmikey View Post
Synthetic Oil Explained

Whether it's evil stuff or good stuff depends on who you talk to. And a lot of what you hear from backyard mechanics is rumor and myth. Myth # 1 is the claim that you don't have to change Synthetic oil as often as regular motor oil. Remember when Mobil 1 said you could go 25,000 miles between oil changes with synthetic oil? Notice they haven't said that for a good number of years? Keep that thought on the back burner for now... Myth #2 is that synthetic oil causes oil leaks. In this article I'm going to try to dispell these myths for you with the cold hard facts about the differences and similarities between dino vs. synthetic oil.

Let's talk first about what "dino" oil is (Dino is short for Dinosaur, which is when it started forming). Dino oil is created from something called "Base Stock". Base stock what the oil companies get after they have processed the crude oil that comes from the ground. From there, additives are combined with the Base Stock, to create our motor oil. There are 7 main additives which include anti-foaming agents, anti-corrosion, etc, etc. At the molecular level, dino oil contains molecules of varying sizes. Imagine the floor of a gymnasium covered with basketballs, baseballs, volleyballs, and beach balls. Now imagine that all those different size "balls" are moving around, flowing past the floor. Every time a ball surface contacts the floor surface, the ball absorbs heat from the floor. That is how oil removes heat from your engine components, from surface to surface contact.
Now imagine the same gymnasium floor covered in uniformly sized golf balls. Smaller, more uniform molecules can absorb more heat from a surface, because there are more of them AND they have a larger surface to volume ratio which means they have more surface area contact. That's what synthetic oil is. A man-made "Base Stock", where all the molecules are the same size, and smaller than those in dino oil. Better heat transfer, better lubricating properties, and a lot wider temperature range without breakdown, are now obtained.
Myth #1 debunked
Oil does not break down under normal use. This is true of both dino and synth oil and is also the reason why you take oil to the Recycling Center and not the trash dump. So if oil itself doesn't ever degrade, why do we have to change it? The answer is twofold: additives and contamination. It will probably surprise you to learn that synthetic oil has all the same additives that dino oil has! The additives in oil DO break down, which is part of what necessitates oil changes. The other reason for regular oil changes is that with use, motor oil becomes contaminated (dirt, water, acids, etc). Using synthetic oil does not protect against either of these problems, which is why you CANNOT go further between oil changes when running a synthetic. You should still change your synthetic oil at the same intervals as you do with dino oil. Anyone want to guess how many claims Mobil 1 had to pay to people that were going 25,000 miles between changes?
Myth #2 debunked
Synthetic oil causing oil leaks is another commonly spread myth. The truth of the matter is that if all your engine seals and gaskets are in good condition, synthetic oil will NOT leak in your engine. The myth started because on occasion, an engine will leak with synthetic oil, but not dino oil. The reason for this is that the smaller molecules of the synthetic are able to get past very small crevices, where the larger molecules of dino oil cannot. But this does not mean that the synthetic oil has caused the leak, it simply has "discovered" an infant leak, and regardless of what oil you are running, this infant leak will eventually grow to a size that will allow dino oil to occupy and pass also. Synthetic oil has not been shown to deteriorate engine seals or gaskets. It is not some evil solvent that will break down sealant, or anything like that. Like was said earlier, it is just a man-made base stock, that is uniform and smaller in molecule size than dino oil. Nothing more, nothing less.

ADVANTAGES OF RUNNING SYNTHETIC OIL in AIRCOOLED ENGINES
So if you are asking yourself "What's the point of running synthetic oil, if you can't change it less often?" Here's your answer in a nutshell.

Since synthetic oil has better heat transfer qualities than dino oil, your internal engine temperatures will be lower. Things like bearings, especially, will not operate at as high of a temperature as a result. The wider range of temperatures that synthetic oil can withstand is well suited for the air-cooled VW engine. With head temperatures normally between 300-350 degrees, synthetic will not breakdown while lubricating the valvetrain components at the heads. The better lubricating properties of synthetic in general will lead to a longer engine life as well. On average, when synthetic oil is run in an air-cooled VW engine, head temperatures stay the same, but engine oil temps reduce by anywhere from 10 to 15 degrees. This is in engines that have all the correct cooling tin in place, and are not suffering from overheating to begin with. Important note: Do not run synthetic to fix a hot running engine. Find the real reason it's running hot, and fix it!

Another benefit is that since synthetic oil is man-made, it can be tailored to suit a wider range of needs. Synthetic oil is now being made is such weights as 5w50, and 0w30, weights that are not possible to achieve with dino oils.

At Aircooled.Net we recommend that you run synthetic oils in all cases, with one exception: you should continue to run dino oil (and change it every 1k miles) if your car still has the stock oiling system.
In transmissions we can not praise synthetics enough; RUN IT, especially if you live somewhere that gets cold (under 30F/0C).
There is one thing I need to clarify though -- if you are not running an oil filter, there really is no point to using synthetic since your oil is going to become contaminated very quickly. Your engine will still benefit somewhat from it, but due to the higher cost of synthetic oil, the gain of running it before it becomes contaminated is negligible. Oil change intervals range from 1000-3000 miles in the VW engine with a strainer (not a filter). VWoM (Mexico) recommends 1k mile intervals on non-filtered engines; keep this in mind for your pride and joy! But on the flip side, the stock VW engine only takes 2.5 qts anyways, it's not going to break you if you do want to run synthetic!
I don't know who the author of that article is, but there are oversimplifications and inaccuracies in it based on research I've done over the years. I'm not an oil engineer, but I have spoken to a few about these issues and done much reading authored by respected authorities.

The breaking down of oil is really a lowering in viscosity due to the shearing action of the transmission gears in a motorcycle's combined engine/oil supply. Synthetics don't need the level of viscosity index improvers added to conventional oil to allow it to function as a multi-grade. The VI improvers don't have good lubrication properties and cook off at higher temps leaving deposits (in high stress situations which many engines don't experience).

The myth behind synthetics causing leaks originated with errors in the seal swelling additives that all oils contain. The compatible chemistry was eventually found and that is no longer an issue.

Although not addressed in this article, the time to switch to synthetics is controversial to say the least. It should be kept in mind that Mobil 1 (the common factory fill oil) is a synthetic hydrocarbon, not a grade 5 esther like Redline, Amsoil, and Spectro Platinum. Is Mobil 1 inferior to those listed oils? Tecnically yes, but it's unlikely our engines would be stressed or exposed to such high internal temps where it would make a difference. Are the listed oils "slipperier" or in technical terms is there a reduced coefficient of friction where they would hinder break-in where Mobil 1 does not? Again, many opinions no clear answers. Redline says on the bottle "do not use in engines with less than 3000 miles".

There's probably more controversy thab there are clear answers. That being said, I use synthetics after about 3000 miles.

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post #22 of 69 Old 11-23-2008, 08:35 PM
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I started using Castrol Semi-Synthetic just recently after my bike had done only approx 2200kms from new. I gave mine a reasonably quick run-in, by really using those revs up til about 1500 kms, slowly but surely increasing the revs for the first 1000 kms in shorter bursts at first. For the first couple of short rides I went up to about 4000 rpm max but never kept it in the same gear for more than a few seconds (maybe up to half a minute max) and never using 5th and 6th gears, just to keep the load off the engine, then I would let it cool down. Then I went up to 5000 rpm, same thing with no 5th and 6th gear. By this time I had done over 500 kms (300 miles) before I even put it in 5th gear for the first time. By now also I was using up to about 7000-8000 rpms in very short bursts off the mark and out of corners and kept this up til my first service check at 1000 kms and although I used top gear in occasions, I made much more use of revs in lower gears than slower rides in top. After the service check, I rode a lot more freely in all gears and took it for a few long rides through the hills etc. The oil they dumped in at the first service was crap if I ever had any. It clunked in gear changes and I hated it, so at 2200kms, and after the engine had really freed up, out that crap went and in came Castrol,, which feels as smooth as a pair of silk panties (on "her" of coourse). Now there's no looking back. It has run as sweet ever since...

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post #23 of 69 Old 11-24-2008, 09:13 AM
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4-5k miles before synthetic is fine. I wouldn't switch before the break in is complete.

Contact me for AMSOIL products!

www.rmbsynthetics.com

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post #24 of 69 Old 11-24-2008, 10:12 AM
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Since several manufacturers are using it from day one in both motorcycles and in cars, without any problems, I think that a lot of our "fears" and opinions might be outdated. That doesn't mean I'm going to go for it, because I'm playing it safe. However, like the arguments regarding break-in procedures (please note Honda has the same wording in its manual from the early 70's), maybe we are just behind the times regarding development of the synthetic oils and what they can and can't do. Or, if that wasn't true, how would Aprilia, MV Agusta, Triumph and Ducati be doing what they are doing????? I seriously doubt any of those motors (except maybe MV Agusta) is/are as well made (tight to spec) as a Honda motor..........

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post #25 of 69 Old 11-24-2008, 10:35 AM
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well... not long back at the dealership we had a customer bought a 08 cbr1000rr and at 200 miles decided to put full synthetic in... well it screwed up big time.. destroyed the clutch and the clutch basket.. i don't know how much abuse he was putting on it but i know the guy and he rides calmer than i do... they got the repair covered under warranty but it wasnt easy....

imesho.... i will probably never use full synthetic.. i ride the living piss out of my bike and i change the oil religeously (i dress like a priest, burn incense, etc) every 3000 miles... i leave every red light as hard as it will launch unless there is a cop nearby... i grind the footpegs on every curve i can.. and i use a quality filter (k&n) and quality oil (repsol semi-syn) and i have no problems..

the majority of us don't ride our bikes hard enough to really see any type of benefit from full syn... or that we would notice a difference from the switch over...

so my .02 use good oil... good filter.. change it when your supposed to... and mail me 10 bucks for my advice......



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post #26 of 69 Old 11-24-2008, 10:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barton664 View Post
well... not long back at the dealership we had a customer bought a 08 cbr1000rr and at 200 miles decided to put full synthetic in... well it screwed up big time.. destroyed the clutch and the clutch basket.. i don't know how much abuse he was putting on it but i know the guy and he rides calmer than i do... they got the repair covered under warranty but it wasnt easy....

imesho.... i will probably never use full synthetic.. i ride the living piss out of my bike and i change the oil religeously (i dress like a priest, burn incense, etc) every 3000 miles... i leave every red light as hard as it will launch unless there is a cop nearby... i grind the footpegs on every curve i can.. and i use a quality filter (k&n) and quality oil (repsol semi-syn) and i have no problems..

the majority of us don't ride our bikes hard enough to really see any type of benefit from full syn... or that we would notice a difference from the switch over...

so my .02 use good oil... good filter.. change it when your supposed to... and mail me 10 bucks for my advice......
I would need your address to mail you the money, so please PM me and wait patiently by your mailbox.....

I have been afraid of the full syn, because a fair number of guys with ZX10 have had clutch problems using it. Enough that it can't be a coincidence. I went with semi, and have no idea if it makes a difference, and I change between 2,500 and 3,000.

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post #27 of 69 Old 11-24-2008, 06:38 PM
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Again, factory fill synthetics are not esthers. They are the "lesser" synthetic hydrocarbons. As for synthetics causing clutch problems, all synthetics can't be condemned because some create issues with clutches and starter drives. One issue is the moly content in the oil. More moly in the formulation is more likely to cause clutch and starter issues. A safe bet is to look for the JASO (Japanese motorcyle engineers rating standard) rating. A JASO rating of MA means that it is completely safe for wet clutches and starter drives. A rating of MB may cause problems with those components

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post #28 of 69 Old 11-25-2008, 08:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barton664 View Post
just forgot to mix in the "deer repellant"
That must be what happened, I thought I was putting in Marvel's Mystery Oil and it turned out that it was Tink's #69 Doe in heat urine!! Damn, I won't make that mistake again, I gar-ron-tee! That Stuff is Dangerous!


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post #29 of 69 Old 03-01-2009, 06:57 AM
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Okay, folks, now I'm even more confused about synthetic oils. I mentioned it to my dealer on my first 600 mile service and they said NO, NOT YET! Huh?

I still want to run synthetic, but now you guys have me confused on a good brand. Being a performance enthusiast of cars, and having a few "hot rods" over the years, I've sworn by Castrol in ALL my CARS that have smaller engines (4 & 6 cylinders) or my cars that rev high (built V-8's). Castrol rocks, but then that's just my opinion. I found out early in life from just "noticing" and then working as a mechanic that almost every auto repair shop I've seen on the planet, the owners/top mechanics swear by Valvoline. In fact I don't know an auto mechanic who doesn't use Valvoline. But I never do.

Back to Synthetics...

I've NEVER used synthetic oils in anything I've owned, car nor bike. But this $8500+ (not including add-ons) 919 is my pride and joy and I want only the finest lubricants protecting her/it. So I want to run synthetic since all the other bike owners I talk to run synthetic. But everyone has a different preference for brands.

Would Castrol be okay in a BIKE? And should I or should I not wait to log more miles on the bike before I change to synthetic? My bike so far has just over 1,800 miles on it. The highest I've had it revved is about 7 grand (I know, peak power isn't realized until 9 grand according to dyno sheets I've seen on the 919). So I don't "race" the bike in a matter of speaking, but I do like to get on it in the first few gears!

SO: Castrol Synthetic okay or should I use a brand "designed" for bikes?
AND: Is 1800 miles to soon for synthetic?

I know, I sound like an idiot. But actually, I'm just a 50 year old bald guy who just bought his first brand new bike off the showroom who is still learning from the PROS (that's you people) all the cool tricks and awesome technical advice so as to keep my pride and joy running strong and turning heads!

post #30 of 69 Old 03-01-2009, 08:29 AM
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well there are 2 issues i have with auto oil in bikes. 1 auto oil does not go into their trans. 2 moly is a killer of clutches in bikes. dont use anything that says energy conserving.....
that said pick up some ams oil

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post #31 of 69 Old 03-01-2009, 08:57 AM
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Changed at 600 miles and ran Honda oil(dino) for the next 3K. Changed to Golden Spectro semi-synthetic 10W40 which I have been using for the past 30K.

I have used GS for the past 20 years in all my bikes and have been very satisfied.

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post #32 of 69 Old 03-01-2009, 09:32 AM
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Thanks! Yep, Professor Barton664 schooled me in a PM all about how & why NOT to use car oil in bikes. I forgot all about that technical stuff. I put a Barnett Clutch in my 82 GS-750 back in the mid 90's and my local m/c performance shop told me DO NOT use car oil in a bike because of the clutches! But hey, that was about 16,482,391 beers ago! So it just slipped my mind.

Brian said amsoil or repsol like the rest of you. And since the majority rules, and I like to stimulate the economy, I think I'll go with the Repsol.

But at 1800 miles is okay?

post #33 of 69 Old 03-01-2009, 10:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xrmikey View Post
Just change it.
By 4000 miles your rings are seated, valves don't matter, & all is fine.
Remember, The Corvette comes factory filled with Mobil-1 at zero miles.
Mikey's right.
Besides, if your rings aren't seated by 4K than it doesn't really matter what kind of oil you use because you've already missed the window of opportunity to properly seat your rings.
I'm willing to bet that the bikes (and cars) that show up on the showroom floor with a pure synthetic, have already spent time having the rings seated on the dyno with a petroleum oil in them.
As for air or liquid cooled, the same laws of physics as it pertains to ring seat applys to both.

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post #34 of 69 Old 03-01-2009, 03:33 PM
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I ran 325,000 miles on my '92 Accord and used nothing but plain Valvoline 5W-30 the entire time. Ran like clockwork. No problems, no smoking. The 919 is also a Honda so I figured I'll just run what they recommend.

As 3DCycle pointed out, moly is bad. The manual actually states to make sure you don't use moly. Would I be correct in assuming the moly additive is only for dry clutch systems?

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post #35 of 69 Old 03-01-2009, 03:42 PM
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You're absolutely right, cmurphy, but I apparently didn't read that page! And I forgot that Caster Oil (I know, it's Castrol, I was being a comedian again) has the additives Honda frowns upon.

You're right, Honda is Honda! Better use what they recommend if I want them to honor that WHOPPING 1 year warranty! I got for $8400!!

I'm sold on the Repsol after reading this thread every few minutes.

post #36 of 69 Old 03-01-2009, 03:44 PM
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You're absolutely right, cmurphy, but I apparently didn't read that page! And I forgot that Caster Oil (I know, it's Castrol, I was being a comedian again) has the additives Honda frowns upon.

You're right, Honda is Honda! Better use what they recommend if I want them to honor that WHOPPING 1 year warranty! I got for $8400!!

I'm sold on the Repsol after reading this thread every few minutes.

(Sorry about the blurry pics but Corona's tend to do that to cell phone pics!)
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post #37 of 69 Old 03-01-2009, 07:33 PM
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i'm not going to debate on this thread. i've read all the pro's and con's on synthetic oil. many internal combustion vehicles come from the factory with syn. oil. it's a superior oil! no if's, and's or but's. does'nt matter when you decide to put it in your engine, sooner the better though. i have used it in all my engines/ lawn mowers included, since the early 90's. only positive things to report. i have used it in all my air cooled harley's, some of which have accessories that cost more than the 919 stock. all this crap about it being too slippery is .......crap. we want low friction and as little degredation of the oil as possible, i. e. heat ! friction! are our biggest enemies, start fighting them as soon as possible! put the highest grade syn. oil in your bike right now, and enjoy riding for many, many trouble free miles!

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post #38 of 69 Old 03-01-2009, 07:48 PM
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06 Triumph Tiger - Ridden nicely on occassion, near redline often....

500 miles, drained original oil, Mobil 1 full synthetic used.

Currently 34000 miles on the bike. It runs incredibly strong. It does not show signs of any problems what-so-ever. It is the only bike I have run Synthetic this early on and it is the only bike I have bought new and yet to have a problem with (with exception of my 01 F4i).

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post #39 of 69 Old 03-01-2009, 07:53 PM
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hairball reply

you definitely want oil formulated for a bike, it's formulation is entirely different than for a car. that's where alot of people get screwed up!

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post #40 of 69 Old 03-01-2009, 10:41 PM
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I realized that after I started thinking about the clutch issue. It's strictly M/C oil for me now for sure! I just figured synthetics might be different than regular oils. I've never used synthetic in anything, but everyone tells me I should in my bike.

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