Suspension Setup for my Weight? - Wrist Twisters
 
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post #1 of 15 Old 07-22-2011, 11:16 PM Thread Starter
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Suspension Setup for my Weight?

Hey everyone, I am very sorry if this topic has been covered extensively, but I didn't quite find what I was looking for when searching through the threads.

I purchased my 919 a few weeks ago and I'm really loving it, except for the suspension. I'm coming from a VFR, so suspension feels a lot softer and bouncier than what I'm used to. The 919 suspension feels a little uneasy in the hard corners, and a little annoying at times when feeling like I'm riding a pogo stick over certain bumps.

Am I able to swap out the rear spring for one with a higher weight rating? I'm 240 lbs. (hopefully losing some weight eventually), kind of a bulky build. Didn't know if an easy fix was to adjust the rear suspension some, or possibly get a new rear spring to help with this bounce/soft feeling. I don't exactly want to swap out the shock for an Ohlins, but I am open to more budget oriented setups...I guess I'm looking for something (a solution) that is a great deal of bang for the buck.

I apologize for my lack of knowledge in this area, but I'm hoping to gain some of your insight. Thanks in advanced!

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post #2 of 15 Old 07-23-2011, 02:24 AM
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We're all in the same boat. Nothing much more to be done other than spend a lotta money on good suspension (Ohlins, Penske seem to be the most popular here) after you change to better springs and good oil upfront.

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post #3 of 15 Old 07-23-2011, 04:18 AM
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Have you cranked up the rear preload and tried to set the sag as well as possible? Have you tried increasing the rear rebound damping to reduce pogoing?

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post #4 of 15 Old 07-23-2011, 08:30 AM
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I go about the same weight & last year I sent my forks & shock to Traxxion Dynamics for some TLC. They put in 1.0 kg springs in the fork & a Hyperco 5x1200 spring on the shock. Wow, what a difference!!! As I said I sent them in for the full treatment which was about $900. I know you can buy the fork springs(about $100) & shock spring(about $100) to do a spring swap your self, although the shock spring is a little more work as I understand it cause you need a spring compressor. There is plenty of info on the site on how to do this. I hope these numbers help get you in the ballpark. There is much more to suspension set up than just the right springs but with them you can can build from there.

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post #5 of 15 Old 07-23-2011, 09:07 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa919 View Post
Have you cranked up the rear preload and tried to set the sag as well as possible? Have you tried increasing the rear rebound damping to reduce pogoing?
I actually haven't done any adjustments myself...kind of looking for some help in that category to figure out if I can get them adjusted to help any. After I figure out how it's done, I'll probably give it a shot with the help of some friends.

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Originally Posted by jclong74 View Post
Toast

I go about the same weight & last year I sent my forks & shock to Traxxion Dynamics for some TLC. They put in 1.0 kg springs in the fork & a Hyperco 5x1200 spring on the shock. Wow, what a difference!!! As I said I sent them in for the full treatment which was about $900. I know you can buy the fork springs(about $100) & shock spring(about $100) to do a spring swap your self, although the shock spring is a little more work as I understand it cause you need a spring compressor. There is plenty of info on the site on how to do this. I hope these numbers help get you in the ballpark. There is much more to suspension set up than just the right springs but with them you can can build from there.
Thank you very much for this reply/info! It's what I'm looking for to help get me started. If I can find a spring that I would be able to swap over to a new rear shock when the time and money comes, I'll be all for buying and replacing my stock rear spring in the meantime. Would that new spring be compatible with my stock rear shock and eventually my updated rear shock in the future? I haven't decided if I want to invest a lot of money in the bike, just looking for a somewhat cheap solution for now in case I decide to part ways with my 919 within a couple years.

Thank you.

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post #6 of 15 Old 07-23-2011, 10:18 AM
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Cheapest short term solution is to at least get the stock suspension set up as best as possible for your weight. Just increase the preload by using the spanner in the 919 toolkit that's under the seat to turn the notched ring adjuster on the top of the spring.

You don't need to take anything off the bike to do this except the seat that you already took off and the one allen key side cover for better access. Notice on the right side how there are "steps" on the adjuster. Turning it so that it rests on a higher step is increasing the preload which is what you want. You can probably go to the highest or second highest step (setting). I am about 195 with gear and I am on the third highest setting in order to get the sag in the ballpark.

The rebound is the little screw at the bottom of the shock on the right side. Screwing it in increases the rebound dampening which slows the shock's return up it's stroke after hitting a bump. No rebound damping and you will only have a pogo stick because the spring by itself rebounds too quickly. Too much rebound damping and the shock doesn't get ready for the next bump quickly enough resulting in packing because there isn't enough stroke and compliance from a shock that already deep in it's stroke.

I would find out where your rebound is at now. Maybe the PO messed it up. Screw the adjuster in gently until it lightly seats and then screw it back out again. Screw it out to the midway point for starters.

I hope this helps. At least you will get a better riding experience as you determine what you want to do with mods. There are tons of threads here on set up. Here's a good general read:

https://www.wristtwisters.com/forums/...tos-24916.html

Here is my sag setting experience:

https://www.wristtwisters.com/forums/...ise-27074.html

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post #7 of 15 Old 07-23-2011, 10:42 AM Thread Starter
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Thank you very very much

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post #8 of 15 Old 07-23-2011, 11:59 AM
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Hey Toast, are you like me, love that buttered toast and jam?
I weigh 240lbs, and I'm on step #4 on the rear, and very close to mid on the damp. On the front I screwed down about 4-5 threads and mid on the damp.
This suits me fine, as I do more long rides then I do the peg scratchers.
The stock late model springs may suit you just fine.
Don't change every thing at once.
Do your sag 1st then do minute changes if needed.

[
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post #9 of 15 Old 07-23-2011, 12:41 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by brokerecord View Post
On the front I screwed down about 4-5 threads
Thanks for the reply. When you say this...do you mean you raised the forks to 4-5 threads so it's leaned forward a little more?

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post #10 of 15 Old 07-23-2011, 01:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brokerecord View Post
Hey Toast, are you like me, love that buttered toast and jam?
I weigh 240lbs, and I'm on step #4 on the rear, and very close to mid on the damp. On the front I screwed down about 4-5 threads and mid on the damp.
This suits me fine, as I do more long rides then I do the peg scratchers.
The stock late model springs may suit you just fine.
Don't change every thing at once.
Do your sag 1st then do minute changes if needed.
Brokerecord - how much rear sag are you getting? I had to go to the third hardest just to get to 1.5" at 195 with gear. Note that this is still slightly more sag than standard recommendations. As noted in my thread, I didn't go more than that because I was going to be running out of free sag.

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post #11 of 15 Old 07-24-2011, 12:09 AM Thread Starter
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After doing much research, I have a lot better understanding on how suspension works, and what all the adjustments do, and what is usually done to help improve suspension.

I guess I should have searched the forum more before making another suspension thread! Haha

Quote:
Originally Posted by jclong74 View Post
They put in 1.0 kg springs in the fork & a Hyperco 5x1200 spring on the shock.
Just wondering, after putting the new springs in the front, what thread are your front forks set at? I think stock has two lines showing, are yours still at that same level?

In the future, I'm thinking on getting new springs and fork oil in the front, and a new spring on the rear...and possibly a new shock if money permits. JCLONG...how does the rear feel with that new rear spring on the stock shocks? Good enough? Thanks.

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post #12 of 15 Old 07-24-2011, 08:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toast View Post
After doing much research, I have a lot better understanding on how suspension works, and what all the adjustments do, and what is usually done to help improve suspension.

I guess I should have searched the forum more before making another suspension thread! Haha



Just wondering, after putting the new springs in the front, what thread are your front forks set at? I think stock has two lines showing, are yours still at that same level?

In the future, I'm thinking on getting new springs and fork oil in the front, and a new spring on the rear...and possibly a new shock if money permits. JCLONG...how does the rear feel with that new rear spring on the stock shocks? Good enough? Thanks.
Looking at the fork checkout sheet they sent me it says 4 lines showing on the pre-load & 2 turns out from full stiff on the rebound. Like I said the bike felt awesome after the work they put in to it! No, more pogo the bike didn't "collapse" when I got on all I can say is a night & day diference. If I remember right it was 1 or 2 from full on the preload & I don't remember the rebound. I had them respring for my weight. I had a couple of conversation with them before they did the work. As you said theres a lot of info on the site about suspension. I think you will be suprised at what new springs & fork oil will do. These are things that are not to difficult to do yourself, especially with the WT's help . I hope this info is helpful.

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2011 Cb1000r

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post #13 of 15 Old 07-24-2011, 08:33 AM Thread Starter
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Yes, very very helpful, thank you.

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post #14 of 15 Old 02-27-2012, 07:02 PM
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Are you able to adjust the preload on 2003 OEM shocks?

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post #15 of 15 Old 02-27-2012, 07:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by david75 View Post
Are you able to adjust the preload on 2003 OEM shocks?
yes, but that's it. 02-03 rear shocks are horrid to say in the least and actually shine when riding 2 up. Your best bet is to get an 04+ rear shock if you want to go cheap or the penske/ohlins if you want to go expensive.

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