Stripped oil drain hole - Wrist Twisters
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post #1 of 30 Old 07-21-2017, 01:19 PM Thread Starter
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Stripped oil drain hole

I tried to search and didn't come up with anything. My son called the other day and said he stripped his drain hole on his 92 CBR600F2. Immediately I thought oh shit. He said he as pissed at something else and didn't pay attention to what way he was turning it. Don't know if he beat on it or what? After some searching I found the oil pan was shared from 91-96, but can't find one (go figure). Do any of you guys have any cheap easy ideas to get her back on the road? Or know where we could find a 27 year old discontinued oil pan lol. I did borrow a drain plug that we use on one of or hydraulic tanks at work and the tap it requires I'll still need a 13/16" drill bit to try that route. Just looking for ideas. 30 years of wrenching on stuff and I've never messed of an oil drain hole. TIA

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post #2 of 30 Old 07-21-2017, 01:47 PM
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Would a Helicoil insert do it?

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post #3 of 30 Old 07-21-2017, 03:03 PM Thread Starter
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Not sure if a helicoil or timesert is the answer since "Violet" hasn't come back to my place yet. I hope we can get get back on the road since she is such a pristine vintage ride.

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post #4 of 30 Old 07-21-2017, 03:15 PM
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Could the old drain plug be cut out and a drain hole from another oil pan be welded onto yours?

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post #5 of 30 Old 07-21-2017, 03:35 PM
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Helicoil will get the job done, but a used oil pan from a salvage yard would be the simplest route and the best piece of mind as far as I am concerned. Call a good one like P&F cycle salvage and they will find one! I just did this for a customer a few weeks ago BTW

Gaskets are readily available as well and cheap even on ebay
Honda 11394-MV9-670 - GASKET OIL PAN | eBay
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post #6 of 30 Old 07-21-2017, 06:26 PM
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[QUOTE=LDH;1293977]Helicoil will get the job done, but a used oil pan from a salvage yard would be the simplest route and the best piece of mind as far as I am concerned. Call a good one like P&F cycle salvage and they will find one! I just did this for a customer a few weeks ago BTW

Gaskets are readily available as well and cheap even on ebay
Honda 11394-MV9-670 - GASKET OIL PAN | eBay[/QUOTE

The above approach is by far the best and the one to pursue.

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post #7 of 30 Old 07-21-2017, 06:43 PM Thread Starter
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Do you have any contact info for said salvage place?

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post #8 of 30 Old 07-21-2017, 07:04 PM Thread Starter
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Found them if drilling/retapping doesn't work out I'll give them a call thanks

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post #9 of 30 Old 07-22-2017, 12:55 AM
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For what it's worth I found a couple of 94 and 95 cbr600 here at local wreckers. The bad news is I live across the pond.

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post #10 of 30 Old 07-22-2017, 10:59 AM
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I had the same issue on my '81 Gold Wing after 136K on the clock. I used a Time-Sert after removing the front cover. I believe it to be a more permanent fix.

From their website:

TIME-SERTŪ is a solid bushing insert. This guarantees easy installation and allows for full load use of tapped hole, ensuring protection against stress and vibration.

TIME-SERTŪ is thin walled due to synchronized internal external threads. Thin cross sectional area allows for installation in areas of limited space and clearance material.

TIME-SERTŪ Positive Placement. Having a flange on the top of the insert will insure that the insert will have positive placement and cannot wind down into the newly repaired hole.

TIME-SERTŪ is self locking. On installation the bottom internal threads of the insert are cold rolled to expand the mating external threads into the base material locking the insert in place. Locking mechanism is at the bottom of insert.

The biggest issue is proper alignment of the bit to the piece being repaired when drilling.



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post #11 of 30 Old 07-23-2017, 08:00 AM
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I would do the salvage yard pan.

But another option may be an oversized drain plug.......

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post #12 of 30 Old 07-23-2017, 10:42 PM
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Back in the good old days when I was working at Morris Industries we used Time Serts in all magnesium wheels: they are easy to install, offer much stronger threads than either aluminum or magnesium by a considerable margin, and can be drilled out and replaced if damaged by a ham handed tech / owner. In the years I was there I installed literally thousands of them, and we never had a failure of any sort. The same cannot be said for Helicoils!!

In fact for many years they were the only thread repair method approved by the military, NASA, ICAO , and FAA.

Most engine rebuilder businesses use them as well, and will be happy to do a quick repair for a reasonable price. Of course you have to remove the pan and bring it to them, but that's the same for any repair / replacement (unless you don't mind having metal shavings and Helicoil tangs wandering around in your motor).

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post #13 of 30 Old 07-24-2017, 04:44 AM Thread Starter
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I'm thinking the time seer is going to be the solution. Now I need to find a kit for a reasonable price. I also need the bike on my possession he was going to bring it this weekend but other things came up.

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post #14 of 30 Old 07-24-2017, 04:30 PM
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I asked my mechanic mate's yesterday about repairing a stripped oil pan drain thread. They work at a local garage. First try helicoil. Cheap, easy and never back out. Second try a threaded insert like time serts. The guys said these are more difficult to fit, sometimes leak around crush washer and sometimes back out. If both of these fail, welding and cutting a new thread. Remember these mate's are thinking like commercial mechanics, cheap and quick. I'm no expert either. Good luck.

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post #15 of 30 Old 07-24-2017, 06:50 PM Thread Starter
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I haven't been able to find a time sert kit for under $100 so at this point I'm going to drill the hole larger and retap it for a different plug but still need to get the bike here my son lives 3 hours nw of me

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post #16 of 30 Old 07-25-2017, 06:13 AM
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How about this idea. Came across something called a self tapping piggy back oil drain plug. Found a couple on flea bay.
Look at this on eBay http://www.ebay.com/itm/142379179377
I've never heard of them.

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post #17 of 30 Old 07-25-2017, 10:34 AM Thread Starter
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Holy shit that may do it! Thanks! Still gonna drop the pan to make sure no shavings get left behind.

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post #18 of 30 Old 07-25-2017, 01:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Islandboy View Post
I asked my mechanic mate's yesterday about repairing a stripped oil pan drain thread. They work at a local garage. First try helicoil. Cheap, easy and never back out. Second try a threaded insert like time serts. The guys said these are more difficult to fit, sometimes leak around crush washer and sometimes back out. If both of these fail, welding and cutting a new thread. Remember these mate's are thinking like commercial mechanics, cheap and quick. I'm no expert either. Good luck.
The only time they leak is if the alignment is off when you Drill & Tap with Time-Sert.

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post #19 of 30 Old 07-25-2017, 10:40 PM
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I reckon you'd be right Doc. I should have mentioned that I would never let these mate's of mine work on my bike. Rough as guts.

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post #20 of 30 Old 08-01-2017, 05:30 PM Thread Starter
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Well we got the plug out I cleaned up the threads on the bolt with a die and ran a tap in the hole covered in anti seize and I think we're gonna be able to save it ? I'm thinking he over reacted and all that really happened was he destroyed the seal washer
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post #21 of 30 Old 08-02-2017, 09:20 AM
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Phewww! Bet your boy will be real careful next time.

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post #22 of 30 Old 08-03-2017, 07:03 AM
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Mistakes are the best birth control going forward. Islandboy is right, he won't make that same mistake again.


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post #23 of 30 Old 08-03-2017, 06:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ST-DocLizard1 View Post
The only time they leak is if the alignment is off when you Drill & Tap with Time-Sert.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gxnm8J9WXz8
The only thing worse than a threaded hole not square to the deck, is an insert going into a salvaged hole that ends up not being square.
A critical part needs a drill press at the very least, along with good clamping devices or methods.
Even then, if it's really critical, the drill press table should be swept with a dial gauge on the spindle, and adjusted to square - given that drill presses vary wildly in terms of accuracy and rigidity.
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post #24 of 30 Old 08-03-2017, 06:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ST-DocLizard1 View Post
The only time they leak is if the alignment is off when you Drill & Tap with Time-Sert.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gxnm8J9WXz8
Thanks for posting the video link.
Unfortunately, it is blocked from us here in Canada due to some copyright issue(s).
I did a super quick search and found the following YouTube video that is excellent and hopefully serves as a good substitution from the one you posted.

Thread Repair Using a TIME-SERT Insert

by repairengineering

Also, the Time Sert installation kit is serious stuff - most impressive.
I have a need that the Time Sert looks to be "the" solution for the ruined critical threaded hole I have on one of my bikes, and may offer a solution for a head on one of my CB750s.

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post #25 of 30 Old 08-03-2017, 07:23 PM
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There's a very interesting comparison video I found on YouTube re repair inserts.
Helicoils did surprisingly well vis a vis Time Serts.
And for deep holes, Helicoils can be stacked, while Time Serts cant.
(hi strength fasteners threading into aluminum need way more than D x 1.5 = thread engagement length.)
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post #26 of 30 Old 08-04-2017, 09:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcromo44 View Post
There's a very interesting comparison video I found on YouTube re repair inserts.
Helicoils did surprisingly well vis a vis Time Serts.
And for deep holes, Helicoils can be stacked, while Time Serts cant.
(hi strength fasteners threading into aluminum need way more than D x 1.5 = thread engagement length.)
Oil pan bolts are not high strength fasteners.
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post #27 of 30 Old 08-04-2017, 08:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LDH View Post
Oil pan bolts are not high strength fasteners.
Yes indeed, for sure not.

I have a particular sensitivity to all this.
Let's just say I learned a harsh lesson by torquing a grade 8 1/4-20 capscrew to the fastener torque spec, for an application involving a single (not stacked) helicoil in the cast aluminum head of my SOHC CB750 a bit over 40 years ago.
(when I cammed it, did some head work, fitted hi-er comp pistons, and changed to early style OEM pipes with the secondary baffling removed)
To hold the cam towers to the head no less.
I don't screw up often, quite infrequently in fact, but when I do, invariably it's a doozy.

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post #28 of 30 Old 09-08-2017, 04:31 AM Thread Starter
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Quick update, the hole was stripped. Couldn't get the bolt tight. Removed the pan drilled and helicoiled. Still had a drip found the pan had cracked. Got lucky and found another pan on fleabay. This pos app isn't letting me upload pics!

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post #29 of 30 Old 09-08-2017, 10:43 AM
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So after 2 months and a lot of fucking around you did exactly what I told you to do in my first post. Good Job


& yea the cracked pan happens all the time with the stripped threads...

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post #30 of 30 Old 09-08-2017, 11:15 AM Thread Starter
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Yeah LDH we were looking almost daily for a used pan. Got lucky and nabbed one. Other wise it was going with me to work to be welded up.

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