New tire flat after accident, what to look for? - Wrist Twisters
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post #1 of 25 Old 08-22-2019, 07:07 PM Thread Starter
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New tire flat after accident, what to look for?

I got rear ended about 10 days ago and noticed my new rear tire was 100% flat. I didn't check the pressure afterwards, so I'm assuming a slow leak.

The impact was right on the tire, but I'm not sure what to look for. Maybe a crack in the rim?

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post #2 of 25 Old 08-22-2019, 11:02 PM
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You should prolly get your rim checked for runout tolerances, I'd look it up, but I don't want to look like a know-it-all...and I'm lazy ;-)
I was looking at some Harbor Freight kit wheel balancer thing with an attachment for checking runout, don't remember if I saw it on here or some utube thing but if they got one at hand I might pick it up next time I'm in HF, looked like it might come in handy for things like this.

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post #3 of 25 Old 08-23-2019, 07:17 AM
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On top of that, you can stick the wheel vertically in a plastic tote partially filled with about a foot or so of water (so you don't get water in the bearings or interior) and rotate it slowly to see where the air is leaking from.

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post #4 of 25 Old 08-23-2019, 03:11 PM Thread Starter
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Found it. Small pin hole in the tread caused by a small white glass looking object.

So, looking to repair this thing, local shop wants $45 off the bike.

I guess they have what's called a "patch plug".

Anyone every use one of these before?

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post #5 of 25 Old 08-23-2019, 03:23 PM
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I've used plugs to repair lots of leaks in vehicle tires.
But never on a motorcycle.

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post #6 of 25 Old 08-23-2019, 03:29 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
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I've used plugs to repair lots of leaks in vehicle tires.
But never on a motorcycle.
I've done plug repair, but this is different, I guess it basically looks like a "T" with a patch part on the inside and a plug thru the hole.

Because I just had an accident and it was a hit in the rear, I'm going to include the new tire in repair estimate.

I'm wondering if I get a new rear tire, should I keep the old one. I just had it put on maybe 6~8 weeks ago and at the rate I'm going thru tires, I'd be using this pretty soon.

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post #7 of 25 Old 08-23-2019, 03:34 PM
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Never used a patch plug before. Never heard of one. Sounds good.
Do it yourself.

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post #8 of 25 Old 08-23-2019, 03:46 PM
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I would plug it with a gummy worm and never give it a thought. If you are able to get the insurance company to pay, go with the patch plug. Much better method.

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post #9 of 25 Old 08-23-2019, 04:24 PM
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Buy them from Cycle Gear and get the Motoguard tire road hazard warranty. Last year I had a series of flats and they just kept replacing the tires.

Tire patches on motorcycles are strictly temporary measures to get you home. The consequences of a patch fails are so dire that it is stupid to not just get a new tire.

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post #10 of 25 Old 08-23-2019, 04:30 PM
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Quote:
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Tire patches on motorcycles are strictly temporary measures to get you home. The consequences of a patch fails are so dire that it is stupid to not just get a new tire.
I tend to agree with this.

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post #11 of 25 Old 08-23-2019, 04:56 PM
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Quote:
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Anyone ever use one of these before?
I had a flat on a road trip, and got home [250km] with a roadside glue-in plug-type repair, much to my surprise, then took the [new-ish] tyre to a repair shop to ask their advice. They took my plug out, glued in one of their own, and put a big round flat patch inside the tyre, so the air pressure couldn't act on the plug from the inside. Rode it till the tread ran out.

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post #12 of 25 Old 08-23-2019, 08:00 PM
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I had a tube patch failure happen once.
On my Norton.
Many years ago, 46 to be specific.
It was rather unnerving, to say the least.
I have not forgotten the incident, nor the feeling of the flat tire while moving, and what my tummy felt like.
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post #13 of 25 Old 08-24-2019, 12:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcromo44 View Post
I had a tube patch failure happen once.
On my Norton.
Many years ago, 46 to be specific.
It was rather unnerving, to say the least.
I have not forgotten the incident, nor the feeling of the flat tire while moving, and what my tummy felt like.
Code brown.

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post #14 of 25 Old 08-24-2019, 10:54 AM Thread Starter
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[Update] got a new Road 5 installed on the rear and kept the 6 week old one. I'll have the 6 week old one patched and used it next time I need a tire.

Can't see throwing away a 6 week old tire.

Total cost $266.

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post #15 of 25 Old 08-27-2019, 07:16 PM
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Anyone know of emergency tire inflators on the market? Preferably small enough to fit under seat.

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post #16 of 25 Old 08-27-2019, 07:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Islandboy View Post
Anyone know of emergency tire inflators on the market? Preferably small enough to fit under seat.
Tire inflation specific high pressure can of C02?
Not the sealant doped stuff, just a straight gas.

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post #17 of 25 Old 08-27-2019, 07:41 PM
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I was watching a motorcycle cop show a couple of nights ago and one copper got a puncture. To get back on the rode again he just pushed in a plug then used a small pressure can to inflate. It looked like the ones you would use for a life jacket or whip cream? I wouldn't have a clue but am interested in getting one. But it would need to fit under seat along with plugs and plug needle.

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post #18 of 25 Old 08-28-2019, 12:48 AM
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Can't remember the brand of my one, but it's like this - rides in a side pocket of my tankbag.

No-one more surprised than me when the roadside fix stayed good for 250km..

Co2 PUNCTURE REPAIR KIT | Motozone NZ
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post #19 of 25 Old 08-28-2019, 12:50 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Islandboy View Post
I was watching a motorcycle cop show a couple of nights ago and one copper got a puncture. To get back on the rode again he just pushed in a plug then used a small pressure can to inflate. It looked like the ones you would use for a life jacket or whip cream? I wouldn't have a clue but am interested in getting one. But it would need to fit under seat along with plugs and plug needle.
Something like this should do the job. You can get a small compressor, but even the small ones would be tough to fit under the seat.

One other option is a special license plate holder that's actually about 1~2" thick and you put a few things in there. Basically it's a plastic box about the size of the license plate that can hold things.

https://www.amazon.com/Motor-Motorcy...a-568499109529

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post #20 of 25 Old 08-28-2019, 12:53 AM Thread Starter
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Here's an example of some extra storage. It doesn't have the other parts, but maybe a bit thicker. I think you get the idea.

https://www.twistedthrottle.com/stas...isted-throttle

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post #21 of 25 Old 08-28-2019, 02:15 AM
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Perfect. Those are exactly the type of kit I saw that copper using. I'm going to get one. Piece of mind and all that.
Thanks lads.
Kiwi glad to hear repair might be good for at least 250km. I'm never that far from home or a mates place. Cheers bro.
Karl that is a very novel storage idea and I will consider if I can't store where I want.
I'm sure the kit will fit under the seat somewhere even if it means dividing the kit up between spots.
Any chance of one of those cylinders blowing up and taking your bum off?.....that wouldn't be fun.
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post #22 of 25 Old 08-28-2019, 05:14 AM Thread Starter
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Perfect. Those are exactly the type of kit I saw that copper using. I'm going to get one. Piece of mind and all that.
Thanks lads.
Kiwi glad to hear repair might be good for at least 250km. I'm never that far from home or a mates place. Cheers bro.
Karl that is a very novel storage idea and I will consider if I can't store where I want.
I'm sure the kit will fit under the seat somewhere even if it means dividing the kit up between spots.
Any chance of one of those cylinders blowing up and taking your bum off?.....that wouldn't be fun.
Those types of cylinders have been around for a long time. I have a pellet gun that uses them, they're pretty common. I've never heard of them blowing up.

The ones on Amazon say don't go over 120F which doesn't seem all that hot to me. I guess wrapping them in some foam would be a good idea to keep the heat off. They also say to store upright, I've never heard that before. I really doubt they'd make it thru the seat, it wouldn't be directed pressure, it would just be the release of pressure in all directions.

I think these are the same thing they use in those air bags. They make air bag motorcycle jackets that inflate when you fall off the bike. I think they use these.

I'd check to see how many it takes to air up a tire.

https://www.sportsrec.com/dangers-co...s-5980374.html


One other note: I have no idea if that flat tire kit is any better than any other, I just picked one for example. Someone mentioned that the cords used should be made in the USA for better quality. I have no idea if the kit I linked is good quality or not.

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post #23 of 25 Old 08-28-2019, 07:45 AM
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Quote:
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I've never heard of them blowing up.

The ones on Amazon say don't go over 120F which doesn't seem all that hot to me. I guess wrapping them in some foam would be a good idea to keep the heat off.
FWIW: a case of CO2 cartridges got left behind in my truck bed with a tonneau cover for a Summer. My truck sees full sunlight all day. I have used an IR thermometer, and measured 148į in the bed. The CO2 cartridges didnít blow up, and they were only in the cardboard box. Iím sure 120į has a healthy safety margin. I wonít leave them in there again, but they didnít pop.
As an aside for number geeks: along with an IR thermometer, I use a SEEK, thermal imaging camera, too. So fun. Start your bike, look at the headers and watch Ďem glow evenly. Check your calipers and tires for even temps, compare bearings, check a chain for a hotspot.. the fun goes on.

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post #24 of 25 Old 08-28-2019, 02:58 PM
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Good to know those cylinders are safe.
I will definitely pick up a puncture kit which uses those CO2 cylinders.

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post #25 of 25 Old 08-28-2019, 05:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K1w1Boy View Post
Can't remember the brand of my one, but it's like this - rides in a side pocket of my tankbag.

No-one more surprised than me when the roadside fix stayed good for 250km..

Co2 PUNCTURE REPAIR KIT | Motozone NZ
This kit uses the same size "small" CO2 tubes as a cycling inflator does.
So that means a Planet Bike Red Zeppelin CO2 Inflator would be more than adequate.
As well, 25g tubes are interchangeable and for a MC tire, I'd automatically use that size instead.
I have a Planet' in my road bike flat fix kit, and can attest that it works like a charm.
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