MTN bike techical question - Wrist Twisters
 
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post #1 of 12 Old 12-16-2008, 04:57 PM Thread Starter
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MTN bike techical question

Look at the picture. See how the rear wheel centerline is about 4-5mm to the left of the frame centerline.
Is this something I can adjust back to center by removing the cassette and adjusting the alignment on the axle shaft?
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post #2 of 12 Old 12-16-2008, 05:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jetblast10 View Post
Look at the picture. See how the rear wheel centerline is about 4-5mm to the left of the frame centerline.
Is this something I can adjust back to center by removing the cassette and adjusting the alignment on the axle shaft?
Before you do anything with the weel or dish shift the chain into the smallest ring on the front and the biggest cog on the back and see how close it gets to the tire. Most bikes do have some offest there to prevent the chain hooking on the tire in low gears.

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post #3 of 12 Old 12-16-2008, 05:38 PM
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When I build a wheelset, I use one of these:
Park Dish Tool
I run multiple wheelsets on the same bike and this allows me to swap without needing to make adjusments to the brakes (other than open or close for wider or narrower wheels).
Check the distance between the mounting point and the wheel face. They should be the same from side-to-side. This is easiest without the tire mounted.
No need to remove the cassette. The adjustment is made loosening and tightening the spokes. The link explains this.
That being said, check to see that the wheel axle is in the drop-outs correctly. I like to put a bit of weight on the frame while the skewers are loose, then tighten them up. This ensures that they are seated all the way in and won't shift when you encounter a large bump.

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post #4 of 12 Old 12-16-2008, 05:57 PM
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I don't think I'd worry about it. How fast are you planning to go?

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post #5 of 12 Old 12-16-2008, 06:52 PM
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I have a dish tool and a trueing stand.....

Never should you need to make an adjustment ever at the axle!

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post #6 of 12 Old 12-16-2008, 06:58 PM
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When a deal is too good to be true...j/k

As said check the wheel dish, if it's good you are done and it's a feature that won't have much impact, except on your attention to detail. I'd only be concerned if the dish was bad, weakening the wheel, which is impossible for a factory wheel, but for aftermarket repair the high school kid could have put the short spokes on the left side. Fixing that requires a wheel rebuild and flip spoke sides. The old school through axle rear hubs allowed moving spacers around to change dish, but now not so on integrated rear hubs. Is the frame spacing to the axle washers tight?

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post #7 of 12 Old 12-16-2008, 06:59 PM
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hard to see exactly why the wheel is canted like that but I would guess it is a simple adjustment. Hopefully if you loosen the quick release and push the wheel/axle in the correct spot and then re-tighten the quick release you should be ok. Hope that is it.

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post #8 of 12 Old 12-16-2008, 07:04 PM
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While the wheel may be slightly out of dish, all of the Stumpjumper frames look similar to that due to weld placement. Mine looked identical, and my wheel was properly dished. Don't worry too much about it.

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post #9 of 12 Old 12-17-2008, 05:59 AM Thread Starter
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Define dish please.

Is it the axial alignment of the rim with the hub?
As in, if the spokes were tighter on the hub's left and looser on the hub's right the wheel would be dished to the left, is that a decent understanding?

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post #10 of 12 Old 12-17-2008, 09:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jetblast10 View Post
Define dish please.

Is it the axial alignment of the rim with the hub?
As in, if the spokes were tighter on the hub's left and looser on the hub's right the wheel would be dished to the left, is that a decent understanding?
You got it! Borrow a shop's dish bar, remove your tire and check both sides that the rim is centered between the outer axle spacers. But if the wheel is properly tensioned (no threads showing) you can't move the "dish" much, say 1/4". Since pro-jeff clarified specialized bikes have that frame space "feature"...it's probably a non-issue and time to ride! Since my trails are sloppy, it's road bike time!

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post #11 of 12 Old 12-17-2008, 09:36 AM
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Jet, WARNING: do not attempt to redish your wheel as a nubie or you will have to employ a local shop to reround it. Building wheels correctly requires much training from a pro. After what Jeff said I'd bet your dish is perfect.

Dishing to a frame isn't the wackiest idea I've ever heard. Our expert mechanic once trued our skinny race wheels to its imperfect sewup tire! Which was neat until I had a flat and he was gone.

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post #12 of 12 Old 12-17-2008, 09:38 AM
 
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Where did yo uget the bike ? If it were me, Id take it back to the shop and ask them whats up ! Nathans MTB need some adjustment after his second or third ride, I took it down to the shop and they went over the whole thing, for free !

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