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post #1 of 56 Old 12-13-2018, 01:28 AM Thread Starter
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Its just you and me now...

After oohing and ahhing for too many moons I finally sold my beastly 09 FZ1 S last weekend. Whilst I had hugely enjoyed returning to that monster after six months on the hornet (partly due to my probationary period, partly due to the riding position and weight) the same neck and back issues I used to have on the FZ1 returned. I did order some Rox risers, but then had a keen buyer for the FZ and decided on balance that the weight and size of the thing (and immense power) and also the trickiness reversing into the yard of my new place all lead to keeping the 919. The deed is now done.

I am to treat myself to some a pair of Pirelli ANgel Gt tyres this weekend or soon after. The t30 evos are probably the worst tyre I have had on any sporty bike I have ridden. They were new last March. Yet the rear is slippy in the wet and also in the dry - I have come to avoid putting any power to the rear when the bike is anything but straight and upright, for the back end has moved too many times. I was going to aim for the Pilot Roads, but my tyre mechanic (superb reputation here in Melbourne) and other sources I trust have led me to believe whilst the PRs are amazing in the wet, the angels are a superb tyre in the dry and fine in the wet. Either way, they should offer superior grip to the Evos.

And so now I am considering what other treats I can give myself, via the 919. Its an 05 model with close to 60k on the clock. Had a thorough service last April, with all fluids replaced, plugs changed, pads and rotors inspected for wear, connections checked and the valves also peeked at (which were fine).

I will soon apply the flapper MOD. WHy not eh?

Also have some cheap chinese baffles which might fit the danmoto end cans as they are quite loud.

My aim is to now focus upon maintenance. Firstly the chain. With no centre stand and the paddock stand I have not the right fit for this 919 I am reminded of a tasmanian on here who suggested removing the chain as a whole. Is this an easy job? Any guides around? And what is the best method for cleaning? I have for many moons scrubbed my chains with kerosene and a grunge brush, then degreaser and hose down, ride for five mins or so then apply motul chain lube top and bottom of chain.

I might be able to throw a few more $ at the bike over the coming months. And wonder what else might be worth the investment and viable for my very novice mechanical prowess to attempt. Steel braided brake lines seemed a nice idea, but I have already changed the pads front and rear recently and the brakes and lines seem fine. So seems a bit of a waste of cash. Unless the difference the steel lines make is very noticeable to the ride?

Often heard in the past that having the fork oil changed can make a very noticeable difference to the ride??? Cannot find anywhere in the bike's service history when this was changed!
Just the oil to be changed would bring some joy? Or does more really need to be done to the suspension to bring added value I will feel?

I wonder if the 7/8 rox risers I grabbed for the FZ would fit the 919?

Other than which, any ideas?

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post #2 of 56 Old 12-13-2018, 04:15 AM
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Hey Gutter, the Tasmanian here. My bike came stock with the Pirelli Angel's. Great tires. Lasted very well, never slipped. The Bridgestone Battlax tires I tried once where terrible. I didn't feel confident with them and they slipped a couple of times.
The chain is easy to get off intact but you need to reverse your swing arm bolt. See first pic. Now you can drop the side plate and slip the chain off, see second pic. Leave your swing arm bolt permanently reversed for future chain removal. You could use a ratchet strap to lift the back end while you reversed swing arm bolt.
Mods and maintenance I will suggest.
Definitely the flapper one. What a stupid piece of crap. WTF.
Pair valves. Just removes so much useless clutter.
Power commander, just cause it's awesome.
Font springs. The hornet 900 front end is like a pogo stick. Fork springs are fairly cheap, and you'll get some to suit your weight. You'll replace your seals and fluid at the same time so it's all good.
Steel braided brake lines. Bit more of an initial bite than stock lines. Probably should think about it since your rubber ones are getting on. Main reason why I did mine. Age. I'd hate to have a line fail. Yikes!
Seat cover, stock is old, hard, slippery and sucky.
Sato rearsets cause they are sweet and it's Christmas.
Filter in the fuel tank. Maybe even the fuel pressure regulator. Must be more stuff but it's late and I'm knackered. I'll think up some more and get back.
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post #3 of 56 Old 12-13-2018, 10:23 AM
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Is the nut fully tightened in your pic? It is not all the way on the shaft & the locking portion is not touching any threads. I looked into this when I swapped my sprockets & decided not to do it because some thing was different when you flipped the pivot--can't remember what exactly, but it was something so I stuck with the original orientation. I think it was flipping it puts the threads in shear verses the shank of the bolt shaft. In the original orientation the cover plates are such that the threads are not in shear even on the brake/far side of the swingarm.

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post #4 of 56 Old 12-13-2018, 01:02 PM
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Yeah the nut is not fully tight in that pic. This is how it should end up. Several thousand kms and on/off several times no sign of trouble. I'll keep doing it.
You can still take the chain off intact without flipping pivot bolt. But you have to fully remove bolt.
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post #5 of 56 Old 12-13-2018, 02:16 PM
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Dammit Bryce... I'm going to pull the back end of my bike apart to check that bloody bolt. Got a couple days of bad weather settling in so I gots to thinking I might pull the swing arm bolt out and look where everything lines up. I think I know what was troubling you. But I got to pull it all apart to see. Good opportunity to chuck on a new set of sprockets and chain. I'm going back to the stock gearing just for shits and giggles. The chain I've brought is an endless 112 link, no master link so I need to take the side plate off. I hope it's enough links.

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post #6 of 56 Old 12-13-2018, 02:52 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Islandboy View Post
Hey Gutter, the Tasmanian here. My bike came stock with the Pirelli Angel's. Great tires. Lasted very well, never slipped. The Bridgestone Battlax tires I tried once where terrible. I didn't feel confident with them and they slipped a couple of times.
The chain is easy to get off intact but you need to reverse your swing arm bolt. See first pic. Now you can drop the side plate and slip the chain off, see second pic. Leave your swing arm bolt permanently reversed for future chain removal. You could use a ratchet strap to lift the back end while you reversed swing arm bolt.
Mods and maintenance I will suggest.
Definitely the flapper one. What a stupid piece of crap. WTF.
Pair valves. Just removes so much useless clutter.
Power commander, just cause it's awesome.
Font springs. The hornet 900 front end is like a pogo stick. Fork springs are fairly cheap, and you'll get some to suit your weight. You'll replace your seals and fluid at the same time so it's all good.
Steel braided brake lines. Bit more of an initial bite than stock lines. Probably should think about it since your rubber ones are getting on. Main reason why I did mine. Age. I'd hate to have a line fail. Yikes!
Seat cover, stock is old, hard, slippery and sucky.
Sato rearsets cause they are sweet and it's Christmas.
Filter in the fuel tank. Maybe even the fuel pressure regulator. Must be more stuff but it's late and I'm knackered. I'll think up some more and get back.
Many thanks, comrade!

The chain routine - sorry to appear rather half asleep - is as simple as removing that nut and loosening the bolt? The chain will then give enough slack to remove once the cover is off? Or do I need to also adjust anything near the rear wheel?
If I can manage this herculean task(!) I can soak the chain in some kerosene, scrub it clean, then spray with degreaser, hose off, allow to dry, then apply motul lube top and bottom and before reapplying, also scrub the sprockets with kero, degreaser, then hose down, dry, lube - finally put the chain back on, the nut back on and tighten up and...all done?

Probably give the PCIII a miss as I am yet to be convinced that it will offer major change. The PC V I installed on my FZ1 did little until I had the ECU flashed (and Ivan's map). Then the bike changed completely. Which leads me to believe any changes with the PC III on the 919 will be minimal. As it was the flash that transformed that bike, not the PC V.

The fork oil and seals change seems for the best, makes sense to put in springs. Just had a peek and the ohlins are around AU$220 from Europe. Is it really worth the extra $ to change the springs with the oil and seals? Might well have to get my trust grease merchant to do the deed for me.

Fuel filter might be something I can do myself? And the braided brake lines would be good, can loosely justify as leaning towards added safety (for the fiance to swallow without more than a brief scowl at the cost) also could be fitted myself (perhaps). Just need to feel more certain they will make any real difference.

Seating is fine for now.

Pair valves I have seen elsewhere on here and will peek when I have more time.

Gearing did interest me...changing the front sprocket on the FZ made a lightning bolt of a difference, but then required the speedo healer to adjust the speedo. Assume the same applies with dropping the hornet front fangs down by -1 or rear by+something? Might get costly as probably best to replace sprockets and chain at the same time! Last done at 40k I believe...

very much appreciate the advice.

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post #7 of 56 Old 12-13-2018, 03:40 PM
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If you can manage to do the forks yourself you would save enough money to afford a pair of springs. It's honestly not that hard. There are some good threads around here as well the workshop manual. I got Racetech springs from the US for well under 200 dollars. Maybe OEM Cycles? I could look back for ya.
Chain removal. Since your swing arm bolt is in its stock position its not as simple as a nut or two. But don't worry the hornet comes apart easy and this will be a good opportunity to check and grease your swing arm pivot bolt because you will need to remove it. That way the side cover plate which it goes through can come away. Its all about getting that side cover plate off. First suspend the rear of your bike. I use a ratchet strap/centerstand. But a ratchet strap and trolley jack will do.
Next remove rear wheel. Tire hugger/chain guard too. Easy.
Now undo swing pivot bolt nut, gently tap out pivot bolt, flip it and put back in from the brake side. This will hold everything in its place. Undo the couple of bolts holding side cover on. Take side cover plate off.
You should be able to slip chain off. I usually give it a good clean in an old ice cream container with diesel. I'm a freak and only use WD40 to lube with. But I won't bore you with that fetish.
Reverse the steps to put it all back together. A good opportunity to grease your swing arm pivot bolt. I like to remove the swing arm and give it all a good clean and pack a little grease here and there. I've left my pivot bolt reversed to make future chain removal easy. Just undo its nut and side cover bolts. No need to remove rear wheel. But I'm going to look into this since a good point has been raised.
Don't think I forgot anything.
Good luck.

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post #8 of 56 Old 12-13-2018, 04:33 PM Thread Starter
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Chain removal your style not quite so simple for me, my friend! No centre stand. No obvious way of suspending the rear! So Im stuck there...perhaps this should be my first port of call, in terms of peeking around for a cheap mechanism for the lifting. But where!

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post #9 of 56 Old 12-13-2018, 05:04 PM
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Good call on finding a center stand. I got mine from a wreckers, Melbourne. Spent a few months ringing, waiting, rinse and repeat. Eventually one came up, OEM around $50. I've seen two on Gumtree in the last twelve months, both OEM and under a hundred.
Seek and you shall find! Just might take awhile.
I keep looking at my OEM stand and think it wouldn't be that hard to make a similar service stand out of some pipe and such.
In the short term how about a small cheap trolley jack. You can jack the bike up, even gently on the headers then tie it off to a beam or similar. I used too before I got the stand. There are some threads hereabouts on lifting the bike.

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post #10 of 56 Old 12-13-2018, 05:34 PM Thread Starter
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https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/2-Ton-Hy...690e:rk:5:pf:0

How about this kind of gadget? Will still need some rope. Can try get the thing into the shed once its cleared out, and add the rope to stabilize...Seems an awful lot of work but I will try to focus upon it as learning and loving my hornet more. Yet will such a device connect to the bottom of the bike in the right way to lift and play with the thing? I guess thats where the rope work comes in!

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post #11 of 56 Old 12-13-2018, 06:15 PM
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Yep that will do it. I would rest a 1inch thick board about a foot long, 6 inch wide on the top. Find the balance point. And gently lift, with board resting under headers. Lift and tie off. I believe someone made a jig for lifting as well. Search for the thread.
Also get some cheap ratchet straps, much better than rope. But rope will do. Can you tie a truckies hitch? It's a knot than you can tension rope with.

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post #12 of 56 Old 12-14-2018, 02:13 AM Thread Starter
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I've a shed at the bottom of the garden. Its cluttered to HAdes, yet I can clear a space and get the bike in. Cheap ratchet straps are $15 for 2 X 3m at Bunnings. A new trolley jack is around 50. SO for 65 and a piece of wood I should be in business. Then its a case of how to get the damn thing balanced. one side of the shed has two shelves with wooden angles as supports. And there is a long bench at the end. Am hopeful of working out how to get the thing balanced without too much bother! Might show pics to gain assistance as I am not a naturally practical chap with mechanical work, as you might have gathered.

Will hold fire on the fork work. Focus first on the chain routine. Lets get to that stage first and then ponder if removing the rear wheel is viable for a man of my absence of dexterity and patience and natural nous with mechanics.

Still wondering on the difference the fork work could make to the ride?

And what have you found with the PC III?

Dropping a tooth on the front sprocket or adding to the rear will require a speedo healer I assume? Though have quite dramatic impact on the low down grunt?

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post #13 of 56 Old 12-14-2018, 03:03 AM
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This is roughly how I used my trolley jack. To lift rear wheel set up near center stand mount points like in pic. To lift front wheel set up jack further towards the front under the headers where they are still four separate pipes. Have the side stand down and chock that with boards. When lifting, cause it's unsteady and I didn't like all that weight on the headers I would come onto a ratchet strap either on the back grab bar or handlebar. Ratchet strap fixed directly overhead to a beam or support. If your real keen you could knock up a cradle out of board that sat on the jack and picked up the bike at the two center stand mount points. So the header had no weight on it and sat between lifting points.
I lifted my bike on the headers a heap of times, no damage. Just go gentle and slow. I wouldn't have done it without the ratchet strap support. Too scary. Do it with an empty fuel tank and once the rear wheel has gone it lightens up a lot. Crack your axle nut while wheel is still on the ground. Just so your not yanking on your bike while its off the ground.
I'll keep an eye open for a secondhand center stand for ya.
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post #14 of 56 Old 12-14-2018, 01:33 PM Thread Starter
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Cheers, my chum from across the water...Do you live on Flinders Island or nearby? Definitely will be taking my recently expanded family tribe to Van Diemen's land at some stage next year. Shame I cannot head over the 919 and charge around, maybe further into the mist of the future. Firstly have to focus more heavily on being able to move pixie queen and her little scoundrel. And dont fancy a side car project for the 919.

Thanks for keeping your eyes open for a centre stand. I sent word to most major wreckers in Australia to no avail. So will get to work on clearing the shed and pondering where to put the ratchet straps. Adding a step for the side stand seems a great way of lessening the precarious nature of the honda shibari routine.

No rush on pondering the front fork work. First I am eager to get the chain properly cleaned. Have only given it a scrub once since April, and that was using the 'scrub, move bike a few feet forward, scrub, move bike a few feet forward etc etc'. And on that occasion I was rather haphazard with the hosing down (never a problem with the FZ1 which I would spray with degreaser in many more places than the chain and spray down after doing the chain) and somehow shorted the battery. Yet it was quite old!

Not sure if I will try the removal of the chain method as per your instructions. If I can get the hoist and planks viable I can use my normal method of spinning the rear as I scrub.

Loose plan>
flapper mod
get angel gts installed (by my tyre mechanic)
Get makeshift lift in place.
Clean chain and rear sprocket (would removing the front sprocket cover allow access to scrub the front sprocket to any degree with a toothbrush!?)
Ponder brake line replacement and fork oil/spring/seals work

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post #15 of 56 Old 12-15-2018, 02:14 AM Thread Starter
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Certainly thinking more on changing the brake lines. As far as I can tell, they haven't ever been changed. As the bike is nearly 14 years old, with 60k on the clock, it seems a good measure to apply in regards to general safety.

Anyone got any suggestions of which after market stainless steel braided lines to get for my 05 919?

The chain was changed around 40k, so 20k back in riding history. WOuld this and the sprockets be due a change now also, through general wear and tear? Or perhaps just make a thorough check when I finally can raise the bike and clean the chain deeply?

Given that I very rarely use anywhere near the top end, I would be keen on changing the sprockets -1 and +2 perhaps. Yet this will throw the speedo out? And require a speedo healer?

Also, should I be giving the rotors a rub with scotch brite? And some kinda fluid?

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post #16 of 56 Old 12-15-2018, 04:02 AM
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Yeah Flinders island.
If ya not going to muck about with the swing arm and just want to lift rear why not just find a paddock stand? I've seen one that doesn't rely on spools. I'm sure it had flat bars that went under the swing arm, each side. Or fit spools.
I've recently fitted Venhill braided lines. Better than old rubber stock lines. My bike had the original lines on it, 15yrs old. I did it mostly for safety. But it did firm the brakes up. And they look better. I waited until they had a sale on.
Any idea what the teeth count is for your current sprockets?
If you haven't run out of adjustment on the chain and the front sprocket/chain isn't noisy then keep going with em.
Definitely take of front sprocket cover. Crud builds up behind there. Good time to have a look at it all too.
Flapper mod is easy, free.
Scotch Brite is OK on rotors. No "some kinda fluid" just elbow grease.
The roads are crap here. I changed out the rear spring then the front springs. Bike felt a lot more comfortable over crappy roads. No regrets.
I've enjoyed the PC111. Really smoothed out my bikes low end. Helped with the throttle response as well, off and on.
Had much rain where you are in the last couple days? It's been biblical here.

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post #17 of 56 Old 12-15-2018, 02:42 PM Thread Starter
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The paddock stand I have doesn't fit and so I am happy to aim for another one that will fit if you can point me towards it, mate!

https://www.wristtwisters.com/forums...ons-80223.html

You might remember my squealing in the other thread.

Surely there is a paddock stand I can get here in AU which will fit the stock 919 without needing to drill into anything?

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post #18 of 56 Old 12-15-2018, 02:58 PM
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I was thinking of this type. It uses what's called cups or L brackets.
Look at this on eBay http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/232997466605
But I've never used one. Just seen them about and wondered. Maybe someone with experience with this type will chime in.
I just did a Google search to find that one. Several popped up.
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post #19 of 56 Old 12-16-2018, 03:54 AM Thread Starter
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I think thats the job, mate!

Took some photos earlier on. Yet to upload them. Though I am close to sure that L shape will fit the metal casing on each side above and around the main wheel nut. I shall try get the pics on here tomorrow then order the damn thing (finally). Cheers!

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post #20 of 56 Old 12-16-2018, 01:15 PM Thread Starter
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Surely enough of a platform under the metal casing to fit the L cups?
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post #21 of 56 Old 12-18-2018, 12:09 AM Thread Starter
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Came across the crankcase breather tube clean in the old manual I downloaded...and peeked just now. The damn tube is filled with dark brown liquid. I assume its oil mixed with water breathed from the crankcase?

Question is...how do I remedy? Take the plastic tube off (which is sealed shut at one end) and empty the liquid then replace it?
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post #22 of 56 Old 12-18-2018, 12:31 AM
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Your right. Loosen the clip by squeezing it, slide said clear tubing off spigot. Empty and put back on. Probably no harm in popping out your air filter and having a little look inside your airbox. Just cause that little drain tube looks quite full.
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post #23 of 56 Old 12-18-2018, 12:50 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Islandboy View Post
Your right. Loosen the clip by squeezing it, slide said clear tubing off spigot. Empty and put back on. Probably no harm in popping out your air filter and having a little look inside your airbox. Just cause that little drain tube looks quite full.
Will do this weekend, mate...the new paddock stand arrived today! Also have my tyre mechanic set to install the angel gts on Saturday. Aim for chain clean on Sunday.

What will I be looking for in the airbox? It was cleaned last March as part of the major service I had done after buying the bike.

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post #24 of 56 Old 12-18-2018, 01:52 AM
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It will be like a new bike after the weekend.
I only suggested looking into the airbox since that drain tube looked so full. Thought there might be more gunk inside. But if it was cleaned out recently probably all good. At least your drain tube is doing its job. Just as a point of reference I can't remember when I last had to empty the airbox drain tube on my bike. Maybe once? It's been dry for years. I think the one time it had a more of a creamy colored goo in it. I suppose there could be a lot a variation in what could collect there. Between different bikes I mean.
Don't suppose your using a K&N air filter?

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post #25 of 56 Old 12-18-2018, 02:44 AM Thread Starter
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I thought the breather tube was from the crank case? Top of the engine? Not the airbox...or if there is oil/water/dirt mix in that breather tube it might also have found its way into the airbox?

I do not think its an aftermarket air filter...have a wad of service history of the first owner (a marooned viking chap had the hornet for a year after him then sold to me when moving to Sydney) which covers regular oil and oil filter, replacement of rear rotor and fluids and a new filter at some stage I cannot tell when, only that it was 25$. Seems more likely an OEM for that price back in the day I assume?

Last March the service I got done included clean and lube of the filter. I will certainly take a peek and some photos this weekend, if I get the time.

Also considering changing the oil, which was last changed in March with the oil filter. Around 7-8k has gone on the clock since. Old manual seems to suggest change oil and oil filter every 12 months or 12000 kms, though I may have been reading it wrong. Was sticking to oil every 6 months on the FZ1 and oil and oil filter every 12.

Is it worth changing both now, or perhaps fine to wait for February (when I will do the oil filter at the same time)...though why not get the beast as clean and fresh as possible in a short time frame eh? Get all the jobs done over the next few weeks.

Still not sure on the flapper mod, but can try it to see if I feel any effect and if not reattach.

Many thanks, for your continued assistance, great to find someone from this neck of the woods (loosely) offering such consistent and patient advice.

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post #26 of 56 Old 12-18-2018, 03:56 AM
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Your right it's called the crankcase breather. But the crankcase vents into the top of the airbox. That drain tube collects any liquid/condensation due to that venting. I suppose the drain tube is positioned at the lowest point, bike lean from sidestand taken into consideration. So in reality it's an airbox drain.
I'm sure I got it right.
I asked if it was a K&N filter since over oiling of filter can cause that drain tube to fill with oil. If your air filter is a dry paper type it's most likely OEM.
Oil and filter at 10,000km, by the manual. But I change mine every 5,000km. Oil and filters are cheap, also quite dusty here where I ride.
Do the flapper mod. The thing is crap. It's there to get the bike through noise emissions. It just restricts the bikes air intake at certain revs. Honda put out some bullshit about it increasing air intake velocity at midrange revs. I think that is some spin.

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post #27 of 56 Old 12-18-2018, 05:35 PM
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If you only need to lift the rear of the bike i just put a jack on the right centerstand mount, jack it up onto the kickstand until i'm happy, then put a block under the kickstand so it's even.

and if you need to do just the front, i just lightly tilt the bike onto the back wheel and stick a piece of wood under the headers. It's only holding up like 20 pounds with how close it is to the balance point so I'm not worried about damage.

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post #28 of 56 Old 12-19-2018, 02:08 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Islandboy View Post
Your right it's called the crankcase breather. But the crankcase vents into the top of the airbox. That drain tube collects any liquid/condensation due to that venting. I suppose the drain tube is positioned at the lowest point, bike lean from sidestand taken into consideration. So in reality it's an airbox drain.
I'm sure I got it right.
I asked if it was a K&N filter since over oiling of filter can cause that drain tube to fill with oil. If your air filter is a dry paper type it's most likely OEM.
Oil and filter at 10,000km, by the manual. But I change mine every 5,000km. Oil and filters are cheap, also quite dusty here where I ride.
Do the flapper mod. The thing is crap. It's there to get the bike through noise emissions. It just restricts the bikes air intake at certain revs. Honda put out some bullshit about it increasing air intake velocity at midrange revs. I think that is some spin.
Emptied the breather tube and found a little more dripping out. So I thought I would follow through your advice and check the filter. I found some grub in the bottom of the filter and some oil, bottom of the filter, as you can see in the photos, was coated in a thin film of the stuff.

Also...it IS a K and N. Should I seek an OEM filter or other aftermarket offering?

I had a quick peek and found this which looks like your OEM air filter in a K and N thread I found>>>
https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Air-Filt...IT1o:rk:3:pf:0

Here is the Hiflo one>>
https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/HI-FLO-H...Ghu:rk:10:pf:0

The BMC offerings seem a lot more pricy!

No desperation to change, for what I have read some oil blown in and a full breather tube is not often a sign of horrid trouble, especially when I have been riding a lot recently in rain storms and do tend to rev quite high soon after starting from cold for my morning commute. Yet, if another filter might make the bike run differently as in more smoothly, and be a better fit for the set-up then why not give it a go? Along the same lines am I right to assume the Danmoto cans (no baffles I believe) might also be so far removed from the way the bike is set up that they are more detrimental to performance than advantageous? Though I am not in any position to consider doing anything with them...other than riveting in two cheapo baffles I got from china when I was considering selling the 919 instead of the FZ1.

Found the flapper mechanism and assume its simply a case of disconnecting the hook to the flapper and removing the metal circle, then plugging that tube and tucking it away?

Finally...the hornet1 pic shows what seems to be a string like wire bent and not in great shape...what the devil is that?
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post #29 of 56 Old 12-19-2018, 04:52 AM
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Well... air filters. This could go on and on so I'll try to keep it short. Lots of different responses to K&N air filters Vs OEM. Lots of people run the K&N filters, no worries. Others say it makes the bike run poorly or erratic especially at low revs. I've actually had both good and bad results with K&N filters. For me it all depended on what exhaust and more importantly what fuel map I was running on the PC111. Most times the K&N filter would make my bike very jerky at low revs/low speed first and second gear. Swap out for OEM filter and instant fix. Very smooth. The
Personally I'd be reaching for a OEM filter. Just seems generally the best one for the job. A safe bet.
The K&N filter does have the advantage of being able to be cleaned. It works by also having a thin amount of oil being applied to it. This can also be a problem if the filter is overly oiled. Our Hornet 900s have a MAP sensor within the airbox that can be fouled by excess air filter oil. I suspect that oil at the bottom of your airbox is excess air filter oil applied at your last service. Also a good reason why you should do it in future and not pay some dude. Or better yet get a dry paper filter like the OEM filter. I would recommend Hiflo since they make OEM filters anyway. I use the Hiflo oil filters. They're good.
Here's a flapper mod link.
919 Flapper Mod question https://www.wristtwisters.com/forums...ad.php?t=12219
I started with the flapper mod. The I removed the valve and fibreglassed up hole. The next level of boredom saw me hacking most of my snorkel off. After that wore off I slapped on this air stack/intake. I don't know what will happen next? Probably shove some colored leds into it... Just kidding LOL.
Also have NFI what that bent wire is?
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post #30 of 56 Old 12-19-2018, 01:20 PM
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I will mention where I often get OEM parts from. Partzilla. They seem to permanently have 919 parts discounted.
https://www.partzilla.com/catalog/ho...4/cb900f-a-919
Because of freight I usually order several parts at once. For example, air filter, sprockets, brake pads etc.

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post #31 of 56 Old 12-19-2018, 04:48 PM Thread Starter
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Ordered a hiflow this morning, mate...and will try the flapper mod on the weekend to tie in with chain/sprocket clean and the new angel shoes for the 919. I keep reading of this surging in the low rpm, and perhaps I notice it, but not as a problem, more as a feature of rawness and something untamed I quite like. It also may be why my issues with the T30 evos have been exasperated, for I am quite hard on the throttle especially low down (aren't we all???) and the jolt of power is rarely smooth, causing surges to erupt in the rear, with any direction of travel other than dead straight liable to cause a wiggle or slip, which has caused me to become more cautious than I would like and certainly avoid much lean in cornering, just in case I apply the throttle and the beast roars like an angry crow at the wrong moment with the T30s feeling more like wood, in terms of flex, than grippy rubber.

Great work on the air filter DIY routine, best I have seen! Probably wont go that far, for as you know, my list of jobs is fairly hefty already and I am pressed for time and mechanical nous!

I shall report back on the angels and condition of the chain after a good scrub with kerosene and grunge brush. and of course the flapper mod.
Cheers for the continued virtual assistance and happy riding today comrade!

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post #32 of 56 Old 12-19-2018, 07:09 PM
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No worries mate.
Diesel is cheaper than kero. Works on chains just as well. I personally don't like using stiff brushes on O ring chains. Soft 1 inch paint brush is my weapon of choice.
Good luck with it all, let us know how the paddock stand works out. I'm curious about those cups/L brackets.

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post #33 of 56 Old 12-20-2018, 11:01 PM Thread Starter
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Tried the stand last night and it worked a treat! Great advice...one of the bolts was not threaded right so I took the l cup bits and they fit my other paddock stand fine. Should have just sought out the L cups! Yet had not idea if they would fit. So will get a new bolt and sell the other one locally on the cheap. Only got $30 for the new one, so no major loss.

Was planning on getting the chain done before the angels appear late tomorrow morning, but with this damn rain and the little chap to look after I probably won't get to it till Sunday. Will just need to be extra careful with covering the tyre to ensure I don't get any lube on the new rear!
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post #34 of 56 Old 12-20-2018, 11:44 PM
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I use a folded up piece of cardboard behind chain/swingarm when letting loose with a can of lube. Works a treat.
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post #35 of 56 Old 12-20-2018, 11:46 PM
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Oh yeah, glad to hear the rear stand worked out.

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post #36 of 56 Old 12-21-2018, 06:32 PM Thread Starter
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Chain cleaned and lubed, rear sprocket, chain and bearings given clean slate of health by my trusted mechanic and the angel GTs installed. Had to replace the valves on the wheels as there were small splits but cheap as chips and simple job for tyre man bruce. At least that takes a few things off the list of things to check and possibly replace. Will only have chance for a put put ride around town today, might get the flapper mod done. Interested to see very soon how the new tyres feel and cleaned chain (perhaps!). Will report back with photos. And review of tyres.

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post #37 of 56 Old 12-22-2018, 02:42 AM Thread Starter
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Only had a quick sprint to the sand to prance in the shallows and throw the moon jellyfish back in the vibrant waters, but the angel Gts seem lovely already. Also applied the flapper mod, not sure if I felt much difference other than the absence of the rough surge! Now that I know my sprockets are in good order and the chain which is a 50VX D.I.D I can focus on spending any spare cash earmarked for replacements on the steel braided lines, which my mechanic said would be felt without doubt, initially at least before it becomes the norm. Will get back to your list of works to carry out shortly and take the thing for a proper ride over the coming weekends. Yet the next job is to adjust the chain slack. Seems simple but I will peek for a guide on here also...
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post #38 of 56 Old 12-27-2018, 02:01 AM Thread Starter
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The beast is running wild now! New tyres are brilliant, have really transformed the bike and the lean is growing every day. No doubt the chain clean has helped smoothness somewhat but its mainly the tyres and the flapper mod which has made a difference, the pull is certainly more linear and perhaps more fierce, Also louder. I went onto checking the chain slack and have 40mm which is a little slack. A quick peek at the adjustors shows one side has faded markers. I plan on measuring from the edge of the metal case to the end of the tightening bracket? Does the current state show that its near the end of its capacity to tighten or plenty left. To my mind it seems I can get well into the blue area so a fair amount of tightening still available?
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post #39 of 56 Old 12-27-2018, 05:47 PM
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Your nearing the end of adjustment. Keep your chain cleaned and lubed and you could be right for some time yet.
40mm chain slack OK. Better too slack than too tight.

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post #40 of 56 Old 12-30-2018, 11:36 PM Thread Starter
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The new hiflo air filter arrived. Doesnt seem oiled? Or do they come ready to go?

Before I think more of the braided brake lines I keep looking at the grips and the warmers and wanting to replace. I never need to use the heated grips in the winter here and they are rather tatty on the bars.

Do I need to get specifically 919 grips or do they come in easy to install universal sizes?

I also have the end bar mirrors. I thought I would just measure the distance and use that as my guide, though there will be more length with the heat warmers removed. ANd how to remove those damn things?
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