How to adjust chain so it's even. - Wrist Twisters
 
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post #1 of 30 Old 06-07-2015, 10:41 PM Thread Starter
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How to adjust chain so it's even.

I went to oil the chain and had it running on a stand. I noticed it was making a knocking sound from the chain/rear axle area. I oiled the chain and that made no difference.

I was able to adjust most of it out by making the chain a bit tighter, and ran it on the stand with the axle loose. I looked at the marks, but that doesn't seem like a good way to make sure it's even.

How do you know if the adjustment is even and is adjusting the noise out a good idea because it seems a bit tight. I'll measure in the daylight, but it seems tighter.

The chain is probably very old, but I'm not in a position to change it yet, I have the 17/44 kit from that group purchase here, but never installed one.

So, can you adjust the side to side based on the sound? What is the correct sound?

I don't have the knocking, but it does sound loud. I have nothing to compare it to.

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post #2 of 30 Old 06-07-2015, 11:59 PM
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Some guys on here have bought large scale calipers, and take a measurement from the swingarm pivot point all the way back to the centre point of the rear axle to make sure the rear wheel is correctly aligned in the swingarm.

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post #3 of 30 Old 06-08-2015, 12:08 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by K1w1Boy View Post
Some guys on here have bought large scale calipers, and take a measurement from the swingarm pivot point all the way back to the centre point of the rear axle to make sure the rear wheel is correctly aligned in the swingarm.
I suppose I could make something like that. I wonder if it really makes much difference. If it did, you'd think a bike shop would have something to check it.

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post #4 of 30 Old 06-08-2015, 04:29 AM
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Checking slack on a stand will tell you next to nothing. If you're going by the honda spec it should be on the side stand I believe, and the right way to do it is to sit on it and have someone check it with the suspension loaded.

If you're hearing a "knock" I would say it's likely that you have a stuck link that isn't rotating freely because either the o ring is damaged or the grease dried out/was washed out. You might be able to make it go away by working it with lube (TWSS) but it's just putting a bandaid on it and it's probably time to replace the chain. How many miles are on it/how consistent are you on upkeep?

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post #5 of 30 Old 06-08-2015, 10:07 AM
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I used to get down low and e the trueness of the chain from the rear sprocket forward.
I'd look along the top of the chain and keep an eye out for any deviation from a perfectly straight line.
That is how I've got along forever.

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post #6 of 30 Old 06-08-2015, 11:34 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by badmoon692008 View Post
Checking slack on a stand will tell you next to nothing. If you're going by the honda spec it should be on the side stand I believe, and the right way to do it is to sit on it and have someone check it with the suspension loaded.

If you're hearing a "knock" I would say it's likely that you have a stuck link that isn't rotating freely because either the o ring is damaged or the grease dried out/was washed out. You might be able to make it go away by working it with lube (TWSS) but it's just putting a bandaid on it and it's probably time to replace the chain. How many miles are on it/how consistent are you on upkeep?
The chain could be original with 28K on it. The teeth look fine and the noise is new, but I'm not perfect with regular oiling.

I wouldn't be surprised to learn it needs to be replaced, that's why I bought that 17/44 kit, but I've never done a gear/chain swap before.

Maybe it's time to take it in for a check.

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post #7 of 30 Old 06-08-2015, 11:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KarlJay View Post
The chain could be original with 28K on it. The teeth look fine and the noise is new, but I'm not perfect with regular oiling. I wouldn't be surprised to learn it needs to be replaced, that's why I bought that 17/44 kit, but I've never done a gear/chain swap before. Maybe it's time to take it in for a check.
Changing sprockets is a pretty simple loosen a nut swap tighten a nut affair... Riveting the chain is probably the hardest part of the whole thing, and if you follow the directions and get a decent took its not hard

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post #8 of 30 Old 06-08-2015, 11:58 AM
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If you've got miles on the chain and sprockets AND you've got a new noise AND you've already got replacement parts on the shelf...seems to me this is only heading in one place. Rather than getting the bike checked at the shop, how about getting them to put the new parts on for you? As badmoon says, it's not a biggie

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post #9 of 30 Old 06-08-2015, 04:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K1w1Boy View Post
If you've got miles on the chain and sprockets AND you've got a new noise AND you've already got replacement parts on the shelf...seems to me this is only heading in one place. Rather than getting the bike checked at the shop, how about getting them to put the new parts on for you? As badmoon says, it's not a biggie
Plus one.

However, running the chain with the rear tire in the air will always create some amount of noise as there is nothing to put the tension onto the chain. So that in and of itself is not a good indicator.

Also, attempting to lube the chain with it running is a BAD BAD idea. Not only due to safety matters, but also the fact that you are flinging off your lube before it even has a chance to soak into the o-rings and stick on.

Lastly, you do not adjust a chain based on sound. You adjust it based on the the specified measured slack with the rear wheel on the ground. It does not have to be perfectly straight and even, the marks will get it close enough that it isn't an issue just by eye balling. If you want it to be really perfect, you can buy a cheap harbor freight large size caliper, file down the measure ends to points, put dimples into the center of the ends of your swing arm pivot bolt and rear axle bolt.

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post #10 of 30 Old 06-08-2015, 04:49 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K1w1Boy View Post
If you've got miles on the chain and sprockets AND you've got a new noise AND you've already got replacement parts on the shelf...seems to me this is only heading in one place. Rather than getting the bike checked at the shop, how about getting them to put the new parts on for you? As badmoon says, it's not a biggie
That's probably where this is heading, it doesn't look bad and I was very surprised at the noise. The chain doesn't look bad, but after that noise, it might be time to do the upgrade.

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post #11 of 30 Old 06-08-2015, 04:55 PM
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If you adjust the chain to the right tension and it's clunking you probably have a link that's binding (kink). If it's a new chain, you may be able to go for a ride and it will work itself out. If the chain is old, probably time for a new one.

As far as alignment, there are all kinds of more scientific ways, but I just look at the rear sprocket from behind and spin the wheel and adjust until the sprocket is riding in the center of the rollers. Then do a final check on chain tension.

Here is a pretty good troubleshooting guide for chains:

REGINA CHAIN - Potential chain drive problems and causes

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post #12 of 30 Old 06-08-2015, 09:56 PM
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28k is way beyond life expectancy for an OEM chain. When I used to have to adjust my chain before I made my simi-automatic oiler I would slide the axle all the way up and the adjusters an equal number of turns. Then I'd check it with a metal yard stick from the swingarm pivot to the axle on both sides.
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post #13 of 30 Old 06-09-2015, 08:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pvster View Post
Plus one.

However, running the chain with the rear tire in the air will always create some amount of noise as there is nothing to put the tension onto the chain. So that in and of itself is not a good indicator.
+1

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Originally Posted by marylandmike View Post

As far as alignment, there are all kinds of more scientific ways, but I just look at the rear sprocket from behind and spin the wheel and adjust until the sprocket is riding in the center of the rollers. Then do a final check on chain tension.
+1

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post #14 of 30 Old 06-09-2015, 09:30 AM
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Quote:
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As far as alignment, there are all kinds of more scientific ways, but I just look at the rear sprocket from behind and spin the wheel and adjust until the sprocket is riding in the center of the rollers. Then do a final check on chain tension.
+1

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post #15 of 30 Old 06-09-2015, 12:09 PM
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If you do swap it yourself loosen your counter shaft sprocket first. I took my old chain off then had to put it back on as to hold the rear brake to loosen the counter shaft sprocket. Even in gear the motor would just turn over and not let me loosen it and as for riveting the new master it's a piece of cake just get a decent tool and take your time.

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post #16 of 30 Old 06-09-2015, 12:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SPYDER View Post
If you do swap it yourself loosen your counter shaft sprocket first. I took my old chain off then had to put it back on as to hold the rear brake to loosen the counter shaft sprocket. Even in gear the motor would just turn over and not let me loosen it and as for riveting the new master it's a piece of cake just get a decent tool and take your time.
You can also put a piece of wood...like a broomstick between the wheel spoke and swing arm when you loosen or tighten the counter sprocket instead of using the rear brake. Makes it a little less cumbersome.

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post #17 of 30 Old 06-11-2015, 07:34 PM
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Just going to leave this here

How NOT to clean your chain. **GRAPHIC PICS*** : Suzuki GSX-R Motorcycle Forums: Gixxer.com

Sadly all the pictures are down just picture a hand going into a meat grinder.
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post #18 of 30 Old 08-03-2015, 09:44 PM
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Just going to leave this here

How NOT to clean your chain. **GRAPHIC PICS*** : Suzuki GSX-R Motorcycle Forums: Gixxer.com

Sadly all the pictures are down just picture a hand going into a meat grinder.
I seen that post years ago, I thought .... wow... I can't imagine the thought of ever doing something like that. When you are dealing with moving parts like that, it only takes a second.

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post #19 of 30 Old 08-04-2015, 06:09 AM
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post #20 of 30 Old 08-04-2015, 12:59 PM
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to keep the top chain run tight while doing the adjustment, back it up in gear if the wheel is on the floor,
or tie it back if you lift it. i think.
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post #21 of 30 Old 08-04-2015, 03:15 PM
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The rear tire should be on the ground or on a rear stand for proper chain tension if you let the rear droop the chain will be over tight with the tire on the ground

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post #22 of 30 Old 08-05-2015, 08:49 AM
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Get a chain alignment tool. $15. Just take care to not bend the alignment shaft.

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post #23 of 30 Old 08-05-2015, 09:14 AM
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I use to stress over getting my chain perfectly straight to the point of building a jig out of things I had around the shop. Now I just eyeball it and go ride and don't give it a second thought.

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post #24 of 30 Old 08-05-2015, 09:18 AM
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I use to stress over getting my chain perfectly straight to the point of building a jig out of things I had around the shop. Now I just eyeball it and go ride and don't give it a second thought.
You know, I am hearing more and more voices saying "clean it when you clean it, lube it when you lube it, tension it when you tension it. You'll get 20K out of a poorly maintained chain, 25K out of a well maintained one."

As much as they charge for chain cleaner and lube, and as much time as I spend on my knees doing it, it doesn't make much fiscal sense to try to extend the life of your chain and extra few thousand miles.

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post #25 of 30 Old 08-05-2015, 09:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmdavis984 View Post
You know, I am hearing more and more voices saying "clean it when you clean it, lube it when you lube it, tension it when you tension it. You'll get 20K out of a poorly maintained chain, 25K out of a well maintained one." As much as they charge for chain cleaner and lube, and as much time as I spend on my knees doing it, it doesn't make much fiscal sense to try to extend the life of your chain and extra few thousand miles.
I'm with you there. To get large calipers and measure off the swing arm bolt and such is madness. Use the marks provided and ride the damn thing. I clean mine a little with wd-40 once or twice a year. I do keep it lubed well, less than most guys I'm sure.

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post #26 of 30 Old 08-05-2015, 11:57 AM
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I'm with you there. To get large calipers and measure off the swing arm bolt and such is madness. Use the marks provided and ride the damn thing. I clean mine a little with wd-40 once or twice a year. I do keep it lubed well, less than most guys I'm sure.
I use WD-40 to clean my chain as well. Spray some on a cloth and give the chain a wipe then spray with chain lube. I clean and lube about every 5-600kms. I have a phobstand so it's a fairly quick procedure to do.

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post #27 of 30 Old 08-06-2015, 11:28 AM
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Before wrist twisters there was and still is hornets nest, Europe got em first along with Canada. Endless discussion about too long 114 vs 112 chain lengths, factory adjustment range stickers in the red after a month and so on. There's guys on there that swear different swingarm lenghts and part numbers between model years and there were several successful warranty claims for new chains and sprockets for going out of adjustment too soon????....and many denied.
Also there was/is flaming on this side for correct axle torque.
And i can tell u that my axle torqued to factory spec without the chain adjusters also torqued in place, will not hold its adjustment under full power.
Its a cheesy parts bin bike so i like to keep an eye on my shit.

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post #28 of 30 Old 08-06-2015, 11:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drivit View Post
Before wrist twisters there was and still is hornets nest, Europe got em first along with Canada. Endless discussion about too long 114 vs 112 chain lengths, factory adjustment range stickers in the red after a month and so on. There's guys on there that swear different swingarm lenghts and part numbers between model years and there were several successful warranty claims for new chains and sprockets for going out of adjustment too soon????....and many denied.
Also there was/is flaming on this side for correct axle torque.
And i can tell u that my axle torqued to factory spec without the chain adjusters also torqued in place, will not hold its adjustment under full power.
Its a cheesy parts bin bike so i like to keep an eye on my shit.
what do you mean chain adjusters torqued in place?

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post #29 of 30 Old 08-06-2015, 11:41 AM
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i make sure they are tight after i torque the axle and even apply thread lock.
could be just my swingarm is cheese but wheel spins like a skateboard after i'm done so i happy.

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post #30 of 30 Old 08-16-2015, 09:54 AM
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I use a thick straight edge on the sprocket to eye ball the straightness of the chain. It is too hard to see the markings on the adjusters.

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