How do you lube your ign key? - Wrist Twisters
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post #1 of 25 Old 02-04-2019, 08:11 AM Thread Starter
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How do you lube your ign key?

First time ever, the key didn't turn on dash lights until I moved it around a bit.

I figured moisture got in there and added some 3in1 oil, but I don't know how the electronics are done inside. Are the electrical connectors sitting there bare where the water can reach them?

I'm guessing WD40 might be best for this. What about chain wax?

Same kinda thing with the turn signal.

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post #2 of 25 Old 02-04-2019, 10:06 AM
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I use this, but not sure if it would help in your situation
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post #3 of 25 Old 02-04-2019, 12:02 PM
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I use LockEase which is nothing more than a liquid carried graphite.
The liquid carrier flashes off over time and leaves a dry film behind.
It works well.
I insert the key part way, basically to pop the keyhole cover open, then drizzle it in.

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post #4 of 25 Old 02-04-2019, 04:32 PM Thread Starter
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Those really wouldn't do anything for moisture that gets down in there, there has to be some moisture that gets in there, even with that flapper.

The reason I suspect moisture is that the dash light flickered like there was a faulty connection.

Maybe it's time to take it apart and clean it. I keep forgetting it's a 12 year old bike.

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post #5 of 25 Old 02-04-2019, 06:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KarlJay View Post
Those really wouldn't do anything for moisture that gets down in there, there has to be some moisture that gets in there, even with that flapper.

The reason I suspect moisture is that the dash light flickered like there was a faulty connection.

Maybe it's time to take it apart and clean it. I keep forgetting it's a 12 year old bike.
Not so fast, sir.
The switch has a drain port in it.
So when one injects a hydrocarbon based carrier liquid down into the assembly, the liquid being non miscible with water will displace it, plus float over it due its being much less dense., thus ultimately displacing the water off the contacts and down and out.
The remaining film on the contacts should reduce/delay/minimize contact surfaces corrosion.

As for taking the assembly all apart, it can be done, but there are some funky fasteners involved re anti-theft.
Years ago someone here posted reasonable detail on how they successfully did it.

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post #6 of 25 Old 02-04-2019, 09:39 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcromo44 View Post
Not so fast, sir.
The switch has a drain port in it.
So when one injects a hydrocarbon based carrier liquid down into the assembly, the liquid being non miscible with water will displace it, plus float over it due its being much less dense., thus ultimately displacing the water off the contacts and down and out.
The remaining film on the contacts should reduce/delay/minimize contact surfaces corrosion.

As for taking the assembly all apart, it can be done, but there are some funky fasteners involved re anti-theft.
Years ago someone here posted reasonable detail on how they successfully did it.
If it's got a drain hole, then I should be able to just flood it with WD40 and that should take care of things.

The thing I'm worried about is that when I see the dash lights off when the key is on and I have to wiggle the key. I'd hate for this to end up a lost connection when I'm far from home because water rusted up a connection. I had a connector on another bike do that, opened it up and cleaned it out and it started working like a champ.

Imagine being on the freeway and all the sudden the ign cuts out because the connectors inside are rusty.

Doesn't WD40 leave some protective coating that works well for electronic connections?

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post #7 of 25 Old 02-05-2019, 03:57 AM
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My ignition key, I believe the little key pins were getting a little stuck, making it so I couldn't turn the key after inserting it into my bike. A shot of WD-40 fixed that. Works like new again.

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post #8 of 25 Old 02-05-2019, 10:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KarlJay View Post
If it's got a drain hole, then I should be able to just flood it with WD40 and that should take care of things.

The thing I'm worried about is that when I see the dash lights off when the key is on and I have to wiggle the key. I'd hate for this to end up a lost connection when I'm far from home because water rusted up a connection. I had a connector on another bike do that, opened it up and cleaned it out and it started working like a champ.

Imagine being on the freeway and all the sudden the ign cuts out because the connectors inside are rusty.

Doesn't WD40 leave some protective coating that works well for electronic connections?
For sure, the need of key wiggling indicates attention is needed.
It may be that the contacts are bad enough that they need work on them.
If WD40 or other doesn't take care of it, then like you say, why take a chance on getting badly stranded.
WD40 will leave a film behind that should help displace water to some extent.
I hope it doesn't end up that you have to crack open the switch to get at the internals.

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post #9 of 25 Old 02-05-2019, 10:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nathanktm View Post
My ignition key, I believe the little key pins were getting a little stuck, making it so I couldn't turn the key after inserting it into my bike. A shot of WD-40 fixed that. Works like new again.
I had trouble that I traced to the key being bent a bit.
It turned out that when unlocking the seat, I was torquing the key enough to twist it.
I got the key nice and straight again, and ever since, push the seat down to minimize the load on the latch when unlocking the seat, thus putting less stress on the key.

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post #10 of 25 Old 02-05-2019, 10:32 AM
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I initially thought that as well, until I used an oem key in perfect condition. Either way, the wd40 fixed it for me which is all I cared about

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

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post #11 of 25 Old 02-05-2019, 02:47 PM
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This is my take on this subject. First of all I use a dry lubricant. Any thing wet/oily is going to collect dust/grime. Once water gets in there it will form a gritty emulsion. Difficult to clean, abrasive and corrosive.
The lube I'm using is a Teflon type product in a high flash solvent. Very clean, dry and repels water.
The product, to get a clean even coating, really should be put on/in a clean oil/dirt free surface. Clean with a high flash solvent like a brake cleaner spray first. Then apply dry lube spray. Give you key a little spray too.
Mcromo I'm interested in your graphite lube. Do you think it helps that graphite is a conductor? Or it doesn't matter in this ignition system?
Karl your key wouldn't happen to be worn at all?
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post #12 of 25 Old 02-05-2019, 03:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Islandboy View Post
Mcromo I'm interested in your graphite lube. Do you think it helps that graphite is a conductor? Or it doesn't matter in this ignition system?
I honestly don't know and never even pondered that thought.
All I know is that my 14 year old key assembly works like a charm and I've never had an electrical issue anywhere on the bike so far. (touch wood )

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post #13 of 25 Old 02-05-2019, 07:53 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Islandboy View Post
This is my take on this subject. First of all I use a dry lubricant. Any thing wet/oily is going to collect dust/grime. Once water gets in there it will form a gritty emulsion. Difficult to clean, abrasive and corrosive.
The lube I'm using is a Teflon type product in a high flash solvent. Very clean, dry and repels water.
The product, to get a clean even coating, really should be put on/in a clean oil/dirt free surface. Clean with a high flash solvent like a brake cleaner spray first. Then apply dry lube spray. Give you key a little spray too.
Mcromo I'm interested in your graphite lube. Do you think it helps that graphite is a conductor? Or it doesn't matter in this ignition system?
Karl your key wouldn't happen to be worn at all?
I'd be lying if I said it didn't have any wear, but it doesn't look worn, bent and still has sharp edges. It works pretty well, I just noticed the dash lights went off when I went to the 'on' position. She's stored outside and sometimes the cover blows off and sometime she's been caught in the rain. So I'm sure some stuff got into there.

The flapper can't be water tight, I can't remember ever lubing it. Much like the turn signals, I lubed them about 2 years ago and it really helped and I don't see much water getting directly in there.

These keys would be better off if they were on the side so water wouldn't get down in there... or the owners can just spray cleaner/lube down there twice a year

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post #14 of 25 Old 02-05-2019, 09:46 PM
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I understand your concern. I'd be a little nervous if I ever saw my dash light flicker with a wriggle of the key. That sort of stuff plays in back of your mind too, takes the fun out of riding. Wondering if your bikes going to randomly shut down.
I don't think that flapper is waterproof, maybe weather resistant.
Once a key is worn a little is it too late to get a copy cut? I mean does the copy mirror the wear on the old key?

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post #15 of 25 Old 02-05-2019, 09:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K1w1Boy View Post
I use this, but not sure if it would help in your situation
That's pretty much the same stuff I use.
Wonder how it would go on a bike chain?Pretty s**t probably, my can says for low pressure applications. But then again I'm having a great run with WD40 only on my chain.

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post #16 of 25 Old 02-06-2019, 12:13 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
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I understand your concern. I'd be a little nervous if I ever saw my dash light flicker with a wriggle of the key. That sort of stuff plays in back of your mind too, takes the fun out of riding. Wondering if your bikes going to randomly shut down.
I don't think that flapper is waterproof, maybe weather resistant.
Once a key is worn a little is it too late to get a copy cut? I mean does the copy mirror the wear on the old key?
I've had this bike for about 5 years and it's been my only transportation for about 4 of those years. I have two keys and only use one. So I have a good spare that seems to look the same. I can't see any real difference between them.

Keys work on a range, they move things to a certain point and getting those lobs worn down so much that they won't work is rare and takes quite a bit of time.

Yeah, that flicker wasn't a good sign, glad I saw it and I'll test to see if she actually starts when that happens without me moving the key. I've tried moving the key and the bike didn't die, but I don't like taking that kind of risk.

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post #17 of 25 Old 02-06-2019, 06:46 PM
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I've recently used an electronic connector cleaner that pretty much instantly evaporates after use, then used the dry lube, and it's done wonders for my switch clusters. I wonder if that would help. Picked it up from O'Reilly's. I personally don't believe any oil base lube should be used on electronic switches when you can leverage products meant for enhancing connectors where surface to surface contact is key to function. Anything petroleum based will attract dust and other particles that will interfere with contact surfaces eventually unless you live in a vacuum.

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post #18 of 25 Old 02-06-2019, 08:05 PM
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Hi guys, new to this forum and thought I'd chime in. The dry PTFE or dry graphite lock lube is a great idea to use as periodic maintenance of the lock cylinder, especially if the bike lives outdoors when not in use. However, it isn't doing anything (good or bad) to the electrical portion of the switch below the lock. It's part #3 in the diagram here
https://www.bikebandit.com/oem-parts...1266#sch308715

The repair manual says to remove the headlight (for the connector) and upper bridge to access to switch. The anti-theft (one way)screws hold the lock to the bridge, the electrical switch comes off separately. It may be possible to open the switch and clean the contacts but for the price $50-60 and labor involved, I would just plan on replacing it. If it can come apart and go back together easily, then I would clean it out with an electrical contact oil after scraping them clean with a points file. WARNING: Switches like this have a tendency to shoot small parts and springs at and away from you. Go slowly and do it in a clutter free environment in case something gets away from you. If that fails, buy a new one. Hell, buy a new one anyway, the bike has warned you.
Hope this helps and ride safe,
Dan

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post #19 of 25 Old 02-06-2019, 11:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grgmini View Post
Hi guys, new to this forum and thought I'd chime in. The dry PTFE or dry graphite lock lube is a great idea to use as periodic maintenance of the lock cylinder, especially if the bike lives outdoors when not in use. However, it isn't doing anything (good or bad) to the electrical portion of the switch below the lock. It's part #3 in the diagram here
https://www.bikebandit.com/oem-parts...1266#sch308715

The repair manual says to remove the headlight (for the connector) and upper bridge to access to switch. The anti-theft (one way)screws hold the lock to the bridge, the electrical switch comes off separately. It may be possible to open the switch and clean the contacts but for the price $50-60 and labor involved, I would just plan on replacing it. If it can come apart and go back together easily, then I would clean it out with an electrical contact oil after scraping them clean with a points file. WARNING: Switches like this have a tendency to shoot small parts and springs at and away from you. Go slowly and do it in a clutter free environment in case something gets away from you. If that fails, buy a new one. Hell, buy a new one anyway, the bike has warned you.
Hope this helps and ride safe,
Dan
Welcome to the forum.
I pretty much agree with what your saying. For the price and piece of mind if my switch was to play up I'd probably just replace with new OEM. I agree also these switches were never meant to be pulled apart and put back together. Good call.
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post #20 of 25 Old 03-03-2019, 07:26 AM
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Got A Story here

Going cross country and stop to gas up just north of Yosemite on a wet freezing day. Used Niner purchased with only one key provided and that was a copy. Had two additional keys made for loss and problems with the ignition switch occasionally getting stuck. Locksmith initially lubricated, but of little use.


. Was using the ignition key also for the gas tank at the time and at the Yosemite station, freezing cold, pouring rain could not move the key to turn on the switch. Oh $hit.!!!! Over a thousand miles from home with hundreds more to go. What Now// With trembling fingers, dig out my spare key and with jiggling and a lot of patience, she turned over.


Since that incident, I have ignition lubed the switch numerous times with all sorts of different lubes. None work very well. Could it be the key? Who knows, but I doubt it since the copy copies don't turn that well either.


the best thing that works for me so far, thanks to You tube, has been using a graphite pencil and rubbing the grooves of the key until you have a fine power. Graphite Lube and won't cost you an arm and a leg. Now who can find a pencil anymore>

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post #21 of 25 Old 03-03-2019, 08:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Birddogvet View Post
Going cross country and stop to gas up just north of Yosemite on a wet freezing day. Used Niner purchased with only one key provided and that was a copy. Had two additional keys made for loss and problems with the ignition switch occasionally getting stuck. Locksmith initially lubricated, but of little use.


. Was using the ignition key also for the gas tank at the time and at the Yosemite station, freezing cold, pouring rain could not move the key to turn on the switch. Oh $hit.!!!! Over a thousand miles from home with hundreds more to go. What Now// With trembling fingers, dig out my spare key and with jiggling and a lot of patience, she turned over.


Since that incident, I have ignition lubed the switch numerous times with all sorts of different lubes. None work very well. Could it be the key? Who knows, but I doubt it since the copy copies don't turn that well either.


the best thing that works for me so far, thanks to You tube, has been using a graphite pencil and rubbing the grooves of the key until you have a fine power. Graphite Lube and won't cost you an arm and a leg. Now who can find a pencil anymore>
Suggest you check your key for straightness.
I found mine getting "sticky" and upon examination saw that it had been twisted from unlocking the rear seat.
After getting it nice and straight again, it's worked like a charm.
And since then, I always unload the seat lock with some hand force before trying to turn the seat lock key.

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post #22 of 25 Old 04-12-2019, 02:13 PM
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My search for getting a new second key landed me here. Is there a transponder in our keys (06 919)? Where are you getting new keys? The nearest dealer is over an hour away...sorry for the threadjack....or derailing.
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post #23 of 25 Old 04-12-2019, 02:32 PM
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Australian/Asian models have the H.I.S.S. They have a transponder in the key and its read by the ignition unit. The US models don't have the H.I.S.S and no transponder chip in the ignition key.
Obviously there must not be no vehicle theft issue in the states!
You can buy a key to fit with a transponder from eBay quite cheap. I even got a seller to precut mine using a code printed on my original key.
The keys transponder must be logged/coded onto the bikes H.I.S.S by using a special tool (couple of wires) and a coding procedure. All fairly easy.
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post #24 of 25 Old 04-12-2019, 04:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Islandboy View Post
Australian/Asian models have the H.I.S.S. They have a transponder in the key and its read by the ignition unit. The US models don't have the H.I.S.S and no transponder chip in the ignition key.
Obviously there must not be no vehicle theft issue in the states!
You can buy a key to fit with a transponder from eBay quite cheap. I even got a seller to precut mine using a code printed on my original key.
The keys transponder must be logged/coded onto the bikes H.I.S.S by using a special tool (couple of wires) and a coding procedure. All fairly easy.
Good to know all that!
No HISS in the Canadian bikes either, also being so called 49 State bikes (so never any California only Evaporative Recovery System).

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post #25 of 25 Old 04-13-2019, 01:21 PM
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Cool, thank you. I saw a vid on the hiss programming but i dont recall him mentioning which bikes had it. My current key doesnt have a code so ill try getting one cut and see how it goes.

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