DIY chain rivet tool. - Wrist Twisters
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post #1 of 24 Old 06-01-2017, 02:39 PM Thread Starter
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DIY chain rivet tool.

Hey guys, i just wanted to share my DIY chain tool. I found this out on the kawiforums. You need a 3 in c clamp and a pipe flaring tool (Harbor freight tools). I used jb weld to get tge flare end to stick to the c clamp.

I'll let you guys know how it works when i instal my chain and sprocket.
Total cost $15-$20

Feel free to flame me lol

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post #2 of 24 Old 06-01-2017, 10:03 PM
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Looks like a perfect way to crack a rivet while simultaneously pushing it out of the link.

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post #3 of 24 Old 06-02-2017, 12:27 AM
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Tried something similar once when I had no tools. No dice. The back would slip off the link and the flaring tool would get chewed up. I just bought a 20 dollar tool set and it worked great. Amazing how much easier investing in the right tools makes things

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post #4 of 24 Old 06-02-2017, 10:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LDH View Post
Looks like a perfect way to crack a rivet while simultaneously pushing it out of the link.
An even bigger concern could be the altered stress distribution that could too easily later lead to an operational use failure with no warning.
Imagine being tapped out at full power and having a chain failure from over economizing and excessively improvising on a tool.

AND
For those that aren't aware, as long as you flip your swing arm pin end for end, you can do chain changes on a 919 without breaking or riveting the chain on the bike, with the swingarm still in place.
(This is the only advantage I can come up with for the unlinked swingarm design of the 919! LoL)
So you can take your old chain off, have a shop or friend with the tool rivet the new chain on the bench for you, if you don't have/don't want the necessary tool.

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post #5 of 24 Old 06-02-2017, 03:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcromo44 View Post
An even bigger concern could be the altered stress distribution that could too easily later lead to an operational use failure with no warning.
Imagine being tapped out at full power and having a chain failure from over economizing and excessively improvising on a tool.

AND
For those that aren't aware, as long as you flip your swing arm pin end for end, you can do chain changes on a 919 without breaking or riveting the chain on the bike, with the swingarm still in place.
(This is the only advantage I can come up with for the unlinked swingarm design of the 919! LoL)
So you can take your old chain off, have a shop or friend with the tool rivet the new chain on the bench for you, if you don't have/don't want the necessary tool.
Maybe I need a pic of this in order to follow or a step by step.

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post #6 of 24 Old 06-02-2017, 04:55 PM
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How to on/off riveted chains on 919s

Quote:
Originally Posted by KarlJay View Post
Maybe I need a pic of this in order to follow or a step by step.
Assume the swingarm pin is already reversed from standard, so that the nutted end is on the chain side.

Break free the drive sprocket lock nut.

Break free the swingarm pin's nut, but don't remove it, just break it free - it being a fairly high torqued nut.
Break free the rear axle nut, same song as above.

Get rear wheel off ground with swingarm unloaded, to permit later removal of rear wheel.
Blocking or a centre stand will be needed to enable this.
A swing arm lift race stand is not to be used!

Remove the rear hugger.

Remove the sideplate that hold the pegs and shifter mechanism.
Depending on how you support the bike, you may not even have to take the shifter assembly off the plate or the tranny input shaft.

Remove the drive sprocket cover.

Remove the rear wheel.

Remove the swingarm pin nut and washer.

Break free the engine side plate bolts, remove them, then slide the plate off along the swingarm pin guide path.

You can now slide off the drive sprocket with the chain on, then lift the chain off the teeth, and simply remove the endless riveted chain from the bike.
Likewise, a new endless riveted chain can be fitted.

Voila!

Not lost on me is that Honda put all the big end nuts on the right side of the bike, as in both axles and the swingarm pin.
There is no engineering need nor advantage to do so.

ALSO
Swapping the swingarm pin end for end also allows one to do a really good pin and frame pin tube cleaning job, and grease with lithium grease (it being more water repellent over time).
This is an ease of future work item, for those that keep their bikes many years or live in humid areas near the sea.

Does the above cover it adequately?
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post #7 of 24 Old 06-02-2017, 05:32 PM
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IHellsent. It looks like a nut cracker!

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post #8 of 24 Old 06-02-2017, 06:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Islandboy View Post
IHellsent. It looks like a nut cracker!
Which?
The gizmo or the work order write up?
LoL........

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post #9 of 24 Old 06-02-2017, 08:28 PM Thread Starter
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I couldn't do it lol. I couldn't press the plate into the pins so i gave up. I now realize that it is better to not cheap out and get the correct tools. I'm going to take it to the shop tomorrow because i want to ride this weekend.

Can i just take the chain by itself to get it riveted? What's the average cost?

I'm in SoCal btw

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post #10 of 24 Old 06-02-2017, 08:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcromo44 View Post
Assume the swingarm pin is already reversed from standard, so that the nutted end is on the chain side.

Break free the drive sprocket lock nut.

Break free the swingarm pin's nut, but don't remove it, just break it free - it being a fairly high torqued nut.
Break free the rear axle nut, same song as above.

Get rear wheel off ground with swingarm unloaded, to permit later removal of rear wheel.
Blocking or a centre stand will be needed to enable this.
A swing arm lift race stand is not to be used!

Remove the rear hugger.

Remove the sideplate that hold the pegs and shifter mechanism.
Depending on how you support the bike, you may not even have to take the shifter assembly off the plate or the tranny input shaft.

Remove the drive sprocket cover.

Remove the rear wheel.

Remove the swingarm pin nut and washer.

Break free the engine side plate bolts, remove them, then slide the plate off along the swingarm pin guide path.

You can now slide off the drive sprocket with the chain on, then lift the chain off the teeth, and simply remove the endless riveted chain from the bike.
Likewise, a new endless riveted chain can be fitted.

Voila!

Not lost on me is that Honda put all the big end nuts on the right side of the bike, as in both axles and the swingarm pin.
There is no engineering need nor advantage to do so.

ALSO
Swapping the swingarm pin end for end also allows one to do a really good pin and frame pin tube cleaning job, and grease with lithium grease (it being more water repellent over time).
This is an ease of future work item, for those that keep their bikes many years or live in humid areas near the sea.

Does the above cover it adequately?

... and all that saves you from buying a $20 chain tool? Hmmmm....

Just wondering, how much is a chain/sprockets replacement labor only cost? It's probably a ripoff like the fork seals, not hard to do, but they charge thru the nose for it.

I otta open a shop...

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post #11 of 24 Old 06-02-2017, 08:32 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KarlJay View Post
... and all that saves you from buying a $20 chain tool? Hmmmm....

Just wondering, how much is a chain/sprockets replacement labor only cost? It's probably a ripoff like the fork seals, not hard to do, but they charge thru the nose for it.

I otta open a shop...
I was going to buy the cheap ebay but there were many complaints about it breaking. Can you give me a link to yours?

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post #12 of 24 Old 06-02-2017, 08:43 PM
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I tried to cheap out and build a chain tool once. Didn't work out so good and ended up buying the tool and a new master link from LDH. I've done quite a few chains since then and never had a issue since.

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post #13 of 24 Old 06-02-2017, 09:07 PM
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Yeah get yourself a chain riveting kit. It will be cheaper than getting a shop to do it. A decent tool will last you out and you will be able to do a proper job of it.
+1 to Mcromo44's tip.
I've reversed my swing arm bolt. And pull my chain off this way. It doesn't take long. The 919 comes apart quick. You'll have your chain on a bench. Much easier to work on and clean. You will do a better job on a bench. The best part is that it will give you a chance to clean and grease most of the back end. Afterwards everthing is put back together properly by you, not some dude who may or may not give shit about you and your bike.

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post #14 of 24 Old 06-02-2017, 11:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Islandboy View Post

I've reversed my swing arm bolt. And pull my chain off this way. It doesn't take long. The 919 comes apart quick. You'll have your chain on a bench. Much easier to work on and clean. You will do a better job on a bench. The best part is that it will give you a chance to clean and grease most of the back end. Afterwards everthing is put back together properly by you, not some dude who may or may not give shit about you and your bike.
Islandboy gets it, bigtime!

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post #15 of 24 Old 06-03-2017, 02:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Islandboy View Post
Yeah get yourself a chain riveting kit. It will be cheaper than getting a shop to do it. A decent tool will last you out and you will be able to do a proper job of it.
+1 to Mcromo44's tip.
I've reversed my swing arm bolt. And pull my chain off this way. It doesn't take long. The 919 comes apart quick. You'll have your chain on a bench. Much easier to work on and clean. You will do a better job on a bench. The best part is that it will give you a chance to clean and grease most of the back end. Afterwards everthing is put back together properly by you, not some dude who may or may not give shit about you and your bike.
I'll have to look at this closer. It sounds like a lot of work, but so does fork seals and that's not such a big deal.

I would like to fully soak and clean out that whole area and removing the rear wheel / chain, etc... would be great.

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post #16 of 24 Old 06-05-2017, 07:13 AM
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I'm pretty sure the Harbor Freight Chain tool is only like $14... why waste the money on crap that doesn't work that costs more from the same place? I had to pick one up last minute after I goofed and broke a tip on my nice chain tool and it worked just fine...

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post #17 of 24 Old 06-05-2017, 11:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KarlJay View Post
I'll have to look at this closer. It sounds like a lot of work, but so does fork seals and that's not such a big deal.

I would like to fully soak and clean out that whole area and removing the rear wheel / chain, etc... would be great.
Rest assured, it is very basic "un-finicky"nuts and bolts work needing only rudimentary tools and not much time.
If one does not have a centre stand, the essence of the job is the blocking up of the bike, not the tools work.

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post #18 of 24 Old 06-05-2017, 03:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by badmoon692008 View Post
I'm pretty sure the Harbor Freight Chain tool is only like $14... why waste the money on crap that doesn't work that costs more from the same place? I had to pick one up last minute after I goofed and broke a tip on my nice chain tool and it worked just fine...
I did confirm, the HF chain tool is $14.99 and you can use a 20% coupon, that would bring it to $11.99 Kinda hard to beat at that price, even if you don't use it very often.
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post #19 of 24 Old 06-28-2017, 07:41 AM
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Did someone mention Harbor Freight ?
Good tool for a great price.

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post #20 of 24 Old 06-28-2017, 09:21 AM
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Does the harbor freight model have the special plates for pressing on the side plates evenly without putting additional stress on the pins etc? Most of the cheapy ones I have seen are decent at breaking the chain, but not so smooth for putting them back together. Then again that is true with some of the expensive tools on the market.

I've been using the PBR tool for the last 4-5 years and I never even pick up my $300 DID tool anymore. The PBR does a splendid job of the work and is very compact so it takes up very little room or weight in my toolbox.


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post #21 of 24 Old 06-28-2017, 10:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LDH View Post
Does the harbor freight model have the special plates for pressing on the side plates evenly without putting additional stress on the pins etc? Most of the cheapy ones I have seen are decent at breaking the chain, but not so smooth for putting them back together. Then again that is true with some of the expensive tools on the market.

I've been using the PBR tool for the last 4-5 years and I never even pick up my $300 DID tool anymore. The PBR does a splendid job of the work and is very compact so it takes up very little room or weight in my toolbox.

LDH,
Arising from the above and the image you showed.
1
Is the PBR kit basically a Jumbo tool plus the Quad Stake Kit?
2
In general, which chains need are in the category of this Motion Pro statement the Jumbo tool: "Requires 08-0142 Quad Stake Rivet Kit (not included) to rivet soft-nose type master link pin tip".

Thanks,

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post #22 of 24 Old 06-28-2017, 10:32 AM
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The PBR is about 1/2 the size of the MP Jumbo Tool (I have a couple of those as well). Does the same job with less effort and parts, but with more precision.

Quad Stakes are for OEM style chain masters and I haven't used that function in over 15 years

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post #23 of 24 Old 06-28-2017, 10:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LDH View Post
The PBR is about 1/2 the size of the MP Jumbo Tool (I have a couple of those as well). Does the same job with less effort and parts, but with more precision.

Quad Stakes are for OEM style chain masters and I haven't used that function in over 15 years
Thanks

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post #24 of 24 Old 05-27-2019, 11:57 AM
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Resurrected for KarlJay.

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