Broken Headbolt - Wrist Twisters
 
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post #1 of 18 Old 09-24-2012, 12:27 PM Thread Starter
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Broken Headbolt

So putting me bike back together the other night and was torquing down the head bolts to their proper 7ft-lbs and when I went back for the final check to make sure they all where correct one broke on me. I tried using a screw extractor but it didn't work. Does any one have any other suggestions to get it out?
Thanks for the help.

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post #2 of 18 Old 09-24-2012, 12:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 07919Dave View Post
So putting me bike back together the other night and was torquing down the head bolts to their proper 7ft-lbs and when I went back for the final check to make sure they all where correct one broke on me. I tried using a screw extractor but it didn't work. Does any one have any other suggestions to get it out?
Thanks for the help.
Did it break off flush? or can you get at it if you remove the head again?


If it's flush or below, then try drilling into it a bit, then use an EZ out. If that doesn't work, re-drill and HeliCoil is probably your best bet.

I would get a pro to do it, I personally wouldn't feel comfortable enough to do it myself on something like that.

Or you could leave it until the head leaks

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post #3 of 18 Old 09-24-2012, 12:47 PM
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I've heard of drilling and tapping with a left hand thread tap, can be a good way to go... (easy outs make me nervous, break that off in there, and you'll really be in a pickle)

Sure it was 7 ft lbs?

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post #4 of 18 Old 09-24-2012, 01:15 PM
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If you have access to a welder, a trick common on the old CB750's is to weld on a nut close to the case. Might be a good idea to heat the case too. Preferably with a heat gun but a propane torch held back at a safe distance should work too.

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post #5 of 18 Old 09-24-2012, 05:51 PM
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Sounds like a valve cover bolt @ such light torque.

which one was it?

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post #6 of 18 Old 09-24-2012, 06:43 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nd4spdbh
Sounds like a valve cover bolt @ such light torque.

which one was it?
I thought it was head cover but Valve cover would be it. I was checking the clearance.

7ft-lbs is what my Factory manual says.

The Shadow also recommend Heli-Coil. Anyone ever use these and can I use the same bolts or would I have to increase that one. I did buy a whole new set to replace just invade the others ate stressed and may break on me too.

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post #7 of 18 Old 09-24-2012, 07:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 07919Dave View Post
So putting me bike back together the other night and was torquing down the head bolts to their proper 7ft-lbs and when I went back for the final check to make sure they all where correct one broke on me. I tried using a screw extractor but it didn't work. Does any one have any other suggestions to get it out?
Thanks for the help.
Do NOT buy your torque wrenches from Harbor Freight!

That's my 2 cents.

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Never said I didn't know how to use it."
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post #8 of 18 Old 09-24-2012, 07:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigdaa

Do NOT buy your torque wrenches from Harbor Freight!

That's my 2 cents.
Amen to that. That's all I have atm, but I'm very careful with them.

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post #9 of 18 Old 09-24-2012, 11:53 PM
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Sorry to hear about your dilemma with the broken bolt. Speaking from experience and forgive me for stating the obvious but i would call around and see if you can find someone to use the tool. I say this cause it's hard unless you have a quality tool and even then it's hard not to slip. Let is know how you make out

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post #10 of 18 Old 09-25-2012, 05:22 AM
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post #11 of 18 Old 09-25-2012, 08:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by g00gl3it View Post
Amen to that. That's all I have atm, but I'm very careful with them.
+1. That's all I have too, but they're not very good. I have all three sizes. The smallest (which you'd need for the 7 lb/ft) is the worst, I have stripped several small screws with that, so I don't really even bother anymore. When I do my clearance check, I'll have to find a quality one. I love me some Harbor Freight cheapness, but the torque wrenches are nicht so gut.

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post #12 of 18 Old 09-25-2012, 09:02 AM
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For tightening large fasteners such as head bolts an inexpensive torque wrench may be sufficient, but for small hardware an inch pound torque wrench of good quality is preferable. All you need to do is multiply the ft/Lb spec by 12 and you're golden. Why? A ft/Lb torque wrench with a range of 5 to 45 ft/Lb is not at all accurate at the lower part of it's range, and will probably not trigger at 7 ft/lb consistently, creating your problem. An in/Lb unit, on the other hand, is designed for this, and a 20 to 120 in/Lb unit will be consistent and accurate. It's definitely a good investment if you work with small fasteners often enough to justify its purchase, and may pay for itself by preventing exactly what you are dealing with at the moment.

As to extracting the remnants of the valve cover bolt -- if there is any bolt exposed it is relatively simple: since it broke while tightening the threads are still loaded in that direction and usually a light tap with a small hammer will release it enough to extract it using a needle nose plier. If nothing is above the surface it's still possible again with the hammer and a punch, then left hand drill it. This assumes you can get at it with a drill without removing the motor.

Good luck.

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post #13 of 18 Old 09-25-2012, 10:55 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robtharalson
For tightening large fasteners such as head bolts an inexpensive torque wrench may be sufficient, but for small hardware an inch pound torque wrench of good quality is preferable. All you need to do is multiply the ft/Lb spec by 12 and you're golden. Why? A ft/Lb torque wrench with a range of 5 to 45 ft/Lb is not at all accurate at the lower part of it's range, and will probably not trigger at 7 ft/lb consistently, creating your problem. An in/Lb unit, on the other hand, is designed for this, and a 20 to 120 in/Lb unit will be consistent and accurate. It's definitely a good investment if you work with small fasteners often enough to justify its purchase, and may pay for itself by preventing exactly what you are dealing with at the moment.

As to extracting the remnants of the valve cover bolt -- if there is any bolt exposed it is relatively simple: since it broke while tightening the threads are still loaded in that direction and usually a light tap with a small hammer will release it enough to extract it using a needle nose plier. If nothing is above the surface it's still possible again with the hammer and a punch, then left hand drill it. This assumes you can get at it with a drill without removing the motor.

Good luck.

Rob
I will try the hammer and punch idea. I tried to use a drill and the surface of the broken bolt was in even and it would not start a hole to get the screw extractor in.

I was using a in/lbs torque wrench as my ft/lbs does not go below 20ft-lbs. And I bought it at Sears 5 years ago and this was my first time using it. I use my ft/lbs one all the time.

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post #14 of 18 Old 09-25-2012, 11:15 AM
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was the wrench tightened when you opened it up... cus that will cause the spring in the unit to become compressed and will give you bad torque readings.

Been using my harbor frieght torque wrenches for years, never had an issue, and they are pretty much spot on.

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post #15 of 18 Old 09-25-2012, 02:25 PM
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I've used those horrendous vibrating engraving pens ( wear your shooting muffs ) to walk out smaller ( 6mm or less ) bolts, as long as it was not cross threaded. The remnant of the bolt should be more or less loose as it's no longer holding anything down.

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post #16 of 18 Old 09-25-2012, 06:03 PM
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Just saw this on ST- Owners

Broken valve cover bolts

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post #17 of 18 Old 09-25-2012, 06:42 PM Thread Starter
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Should have known there was a video on YouTube of it.

So I need to buy a kit then.

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post #18 of 18 Old 09-26-2012, 05:24 AM
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Dave, This pictorial may help as well....This came from ngwclub.com, the Naked Goldwing site...

ngwclub.com - Stripped Thread Renewal

Although this subject comes up regularly I don’t remember seeing anything about what it is or how it’s done, so I though that a pictorial tutorial would be usefull.

Thread renewal is a way of replacing a stripped thread with a coil of (usually) stainless steel carefully manufactured to mimic the dimensions of the original thread once installed.

It is a relatively simple procedure once you know how ( as are most things) but could be daunting to someone with little knowledge and some stripped threads!

There are various kits on the market, Helicoil being the best known (and usually the most expensive). Your local tool store should be able to help or there is always the ubiquitous eBay.
Usually each kit is for a dedicated size of thread.
The threads being renewed here are the 6mm x1mm for the rocker box screws.


OK, HERE WE GO!



The tools you will need. Thread renewal kit, drill, hammer, tap wrench, small screwdiver, thread lock solution, grease.



Make sure to cover everything with cloths or paper towels pushed into all the crevices to stop the swarf getting into places it should’nt.
It still will, so be anal when cleaning up after you have finished the job!




Check out how deep the drill has to go with the small screwdriver.



Transfer that dimension to the drill. I used a bit of masking tape ; if you have a drill collar so much the better.




This is the bit that usually goes wrong so check, check, check again. Borrow a friend’s eyes so that you check from the top and they check from the side.
You need to be 90 degrees both ways!

Hold the drill very firmly and use a slow speed because it will likely try to grab!
A dab of grease on the flutes will help lubricate it and also trap some of the swarf.

A good tip. If I’m drilling down an existing hole in a soft metal such as aluminium I dull the cutting edges of the drill with a sharpening stone to reduce the chance of it grabbing (note! Dull not blunt!)



A little grease on the end of the tap will help lubricate it and trap some of the swarf.



You’ll need you friend again when you go to tap out the hole. Very easy to run off with a tap so make doubly sure it’s at 90 degrees.

http://i298.photobucket.com/albums/m...tips/heli9.jpg


Loads of swarf trapped but there will still be more down there. Use the small screwdriver with some grease to remove the rest.



The new coil is slipped over the installation tool with the coil tang towards the bottom of the tool.



In this instance we want the top of the coil to be slightly below the surface so the installation tool collar is set as above.



Put a little thread lock solution in the outside of the coil before inserting it.



Screw the coil into the hole slowly down to the stop collar.
REMEMBER. YOU CAN SCREW IT IN FURTHER IF NEED BE; YOU CANNOT SCREW IT BACK OUT IF IT’S TOO DEEP!



Once the coil is in place use the thin metal rod to knock the installation tang off the coil.




Finally, check that the intended bolt fits the new thread.

Only another seven to do! To give you an idea (admittedly I've done this kind of thing before) all eight were done in about half an hour.

Time for clean-up and the job is done!
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Well, fire the engines! Spur this iron space-pony on!

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