Anybody know about quickshifters? - Wrist Twisters
 
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post #1 of 18 Old 12-04-2013, 12:51 AM Thread Starter
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Anybody know about quickshifters?

Im looking to understand more about quickshifters. My girl had a huge accident 18 months ago. Her injuries mean she no longer will have normal use of her left foot. I would like to mod her track bike so she can ride a track day on it once the rest of her injuries allow.

So i was wondering if a quickshifter removes the need for using the left foot for gear changes? Do you need to clutch at the same time?

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post #2 of 18 Old 12-04-2013, 01:17 AM
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No, it doesn't, you still have to trip the shift with your foot.

Drag racers use air/pneumatic shifters, but those rely on air bottles that cannot be recharged 'in flight' to work.

What I think you are looking for is an electric shifter.
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post #3 of 18 Old 12-04-2013, 01:19 AM
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A quickshifter typically only works for upshifts, not downshifts. They're clutchless (most times). You'll still need the left foot for gear changes.

CB700 beat me, with better info

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post #4 of 18 Old 12-04-2013, 01:24 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by CB700S View Post
No, it doesn't, you still have to trip the shift with your foot.

Drag racers use air/pneumatic shifters, but those rely on air bottles that cannot be recharged 'in flight' to work.

What I think you are looking for is an electric shifter.
Electronic Shifters for Disabled Motorcycle Riders
Flatshifter - The Range
Pingel All Electric Up/Down Shifters

Thanks for that, good start.

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post #5 of 18 Old 12-04-2013, 08:14 AM
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Rob:
There are electric / electronic shift kits for disabled riders that allow up / down shifting using a pair of switches that operate a bidirectional solenoid to rotate the shift rod in the appropriate direction, but they are quite expensive, over 800 USD at minimum.

If her right foot is still fully functional it is possible to move the shift lever to the right side, but will take some creativity. The usual way is to fabricate a pair of pillow blocks that bolt to the engine / frame that hold a shaft splined on both ends to make a bellcrank connected to the shift arm on the left and the lever on the right with a pair of heim jointed turnbuckle rods to link it all up. A more visually and mechanically neat setup is to remove the clutch cover and clutch assembly in order to establish a drilling in the clutch cover aligned with the shift rod. Once a center is found drill through from the inside, flip the cover, locate an accurate center on the drilling, and mill out a hole of sufficient size to press in and weld a boss that acts as a bearing and seal mount. Then find a shift shaft that has the same diameter and spline tooth count at a breaker, cut off the splined end and weld it onto the end of the existing shift shaft. It has to be exactly concentric to the shaft to prevent binding or leaks. One important point to pay attention to is the shaft is positively located by a stub on the inside of the clutch cover, so some method of maintaining that location will have to be worked out. Once everything is mounted up a lever bolted directly to the shaft would work if a GP (up for low, down to upshift) pattern is acceptable, if not it will be necessary to mount up a shifter on the right side -- maybe a boss welded onto the existing right footpeg mount.

Of course there is another thing to work out: the rear brake. There are a number of handlebar left side thumb brake setups made for stunters, and it is probable that one of those could be made to work.

Wish her well for me, and good luck getting her back on two wheels.

Rob

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post #6 of 18 Old 12-05-2013, 03:17 PM
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Usually most quick shifters use a pressure activated switch on the adjuster rod of the foot lever and it basically gets programmed to do a slight ignition interrupt that will allow you to quick shift up. Big money kits are out there that will provide push button activated quick shifts for up and down but they usually involve more sensors, and are usually more oriented towards a complete drive by wire system (or some manner to provide throttle blip as well as ignition interrupt, which are mostly found on bikes that have been manufactured in the past few years.) I have seen a lot of racers that have ankle and foot injuries (or a missing leg in one case) convert to a right side shift using some different linkage setups and then move on to a clutch and brake lever on the left side but that is going to depend on your bike and your ability to fab (or find a decent fabricator). Your answer can be had but the solution is probably not going to be exactly bolt on and its likely to cost a fair amount as well.

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post #7 of 18 Old 11-13-2014, 09:52 AM Thread Starter
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Starting to look at this again as she is now starting to get to the point of being able to ride. Whatever we use will be going on a CBR600 F2 im rebuilding for her.

Thinking about a home made system currently.

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post #8 of 18 Old 11-13-2014, 11:33 AM
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The Honda fourtrax and foreman both came with electronic shift but they were also clutch less but possibly could be modified to fit? With the zillions of them out out there parts should be able to be found for cheap enough good luck.

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post #9 of 18 Old 11-14-2014, 12:09 AM Thread Starter
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My current thinking is using a twist grip on the LH side and run cables down to the gear selector input shaft. Very easy bit of engineering.

But very open to ideas.

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post #10 of 18 Old 11-14-2014, 01:43 AM
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I'm wondering how much leverage would be required to trigger the shift by cable, Rob, and whether you could get enough of it from a hand grip.

The cable idea has got me thinking about my old Yamaha DT200R which had a little servo motor to run the power valve open and shut [by cable], and whether you could use something like that to your advantage? Much more complex to engineer, though, I guess.

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post #11 of 18 Old 11-14-2014, 09:30 AM
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If this guy can do it, I'm sure you can figure something out for your significant other.


Here's another guy that talks about how he gets around the gear shift changes: BBC Sport - How a double amputee is racing a superbike at 150mph

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post #12 of 18 Old 11-14-2014, 06:48 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K1w1Boy View Post
I'm wondering how much leverage would be required to trigger the shift by cable, Rob, and whether you could get enough of it from a hand grip.

The cable idea has got me thinking about my old Yamaha DT200R which had a little servo motor to run the power valve open and shut [by cable], and whether you could use something like that to your advantage? Much more complex to engineer, though, I guess.
Leverage ratio is what i need to try out. Will do some work on it tomorrow.

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post #13 of 18 Old 11-14-2014, 06:49 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Pvster View Post
If this guy can do it, I'm sure you can figure something out for your significant other.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DbrIoPY4nO8

Here's another guy that talks about how he gets around the gear shift changes: BBC Sport - How a double amputee is racing a superbike at 150mph
Thanks for that. The BBC piece was very interesting.

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post #14 of 18 Old 11-14-2014, 06:58 PM
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Originally Posted by NZspokes View Post
Leverage ratio is what i need to try out. Will do some work on it tomorrow.
I'm thinking too of those old school heel and toe rockers they used to have for shifting on commuter bikes like the 100cc 2-stroke singles from Yam and Honda, way back. The longer the piece you could find and fit to the gear spline minus heel and toe pieces, the more leverage your cable pull would eventually have.

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post #15 of 18 Old 11-14-2014, 07:29 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K1w1Boy View Post
I'm thinking too of those old school heel and toe rockers they used to have for shifting on commuter bikes like the 100cc 2-stroke singles from Yam and Honda, way back. The longer the piece you could find and fit to the gear spline minus heel and toe pieces, the more leverage your cable pull would eventually have.
But the longer you make the lever the longer the throw at the grip. I can turn the input shaft by hand with the knuckle on it so not mush effort is needed.

Also thinking of a different way. She can down shift fine. So either use the grip idea for just upshifts. Or use something along the lines of a MTB thumbshifter under the bar which she pushes forward to upshift.

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post #16 of 18 Old 11-14-2014, 11:22 PM
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Originally Posted by NZspokes View Post
Thanks for that. The BBC piece was very interesting.
Did some quick searching, this is what I found. Hopefully they'll give you some ideas.

Electric Motorcycle Shifter For Handicapped And Disabled Riders | Disabled Motorcycle Rider

Motorcycle Amputee

Motorcycles and parts for disabled riders.

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post #17 of 18 Old 11-15-2014, 05:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SPYDER View Post
The Honda fourtrax and foreman both came with electronic shift but they were also clutch less but possibly could be modified to fit? With the zillions of them out out there parts should be able to be found for cheap enough good luck.
This^^^ +1 Spyder.....I've also mention this on another site in hopes of helping another rider that lost use of his left leg...and you're right with Bzillions of them being made, the control switches can be had for ...
$79+free shipping


image-1589935853.jpg

The servo motor for $90+free ship


image-2114006157.jpg

Or the entire housing with servo for $80+ free ship


image-1446717696.jpg

Although I'm assuming the housing and servo kit is a generic/Chinese

These little servos should be plenty strong enough to shift a bike being that they can shift the clunky ATV transmissions...

**just a note** I do know they require a good battery/charging system to operate properly, but if some fabrication is an option for you this route might save some $$

:buell:
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post #18 of 18 Old 11-15-2014, 06:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiplash97 View Post
This^^^ +1 Spyder.....I've also mention this on another site in hopes of helping another rider that lost use of his left leg...and you're right with Bzillions of them being made, the control switches can be had for ...
$79+free shipping


Attachment 87049

The servo motor for $90+free ship


Attachment 87057

Or the entire housing with servo for $80+ free ship


Attachment 87065

Although I'm assuming the housing and servo kit is a generic/Chinese

These little servos should be plenty strong enough to shift a bike being that they can shift the clunky ATV transmissions...

**just a note** I do know they require a good battery/charging system to operate properly, but if some fabrication is an option for you this route might save some $$
Excellent posting, exactly along the lines of what I was thinking, but even better.

The Honda switch quality is excellent - there are made to withstand use on ATV in all weather conditions, should hold up excellent on a motorcycle.

At one time, I was going to configure one to work on a Jr. Dragster.

We were close to sealing the deal, when the owner assumed I was going to do it all for free.

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