919 engine swap - Wrist Twisters
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post #1 of 21 Old 07-11-2019, 01:22 PM Thread Starter
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919 engine swap

Hello and good day/night to everyone !
I'm not sure if this has been posted before so I'll just make it quick and short.

Is it possible to fit a 2007 919 engine into a 2003 919 chassis ,
Reason I ask is because my current engine has an "ovalised " journal on the crankshaft and repairing it on island is near impossible.

Any help is greatly appreciated !

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post #2 of 21 Old 07-11-2019, 05:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinclair View Post
Hello and good day/night to everyone !
I'm not sure if this has been posted before so I'll just make it quick and short.

Is it possible to fit a 2007 919 engine into a 2003 919 chassis ,
Reason I ask is because my current engine has an "ovalised " journal on the crankshaft and repairing it on island is near impossible.

Any help is greatly appreciated !
Yes!
Pure and simple interchangeability.

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post #3 of 21 Old 07-11-2019, 06:16 PM
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Any idea as to the cause of your current engines troubles?
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post #4 of 21 Old 07-11-2019, 08:07 PM Thread Starter
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Amazing !
That's what I thought but wanted the reassurance ! Thank you !

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post #5 of 21 Old 07-11-2019, 08:22 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Islandboy View Post
Any idea as to the cause of your current engines troubles?
Well, it's a long story...

Basically it all started out a few years ago when I first got the bike.
Bought it off an older gentleman so I thought it would be in decent condition. (Probably was till I got it).

Then, just like your average adrenaline early 20's junky. I decided to learn how to wheelie through YouTube tutorials. Wasnt quite nailing it, but managed to get the front wheel about 2 ft off the ground for about 20ft before slamming it back down. Eventually joined a group of riders on island that also had the same hunger for adrenaline . I started getting the hang of it and was just shy of finding the balance point .
Then it happened...the notorious engine knock.
I had no idea what it was all about so silly me ignored it for way too long until one day the engine seized on my commute to work. Luckily I was only going 30mph and squeezed the clutch in to avoid sliding.
Had a few mechanics look at it ( not many to choose from on island) and was advised to get a new engine.

A few months go by and I saved my pennies up for another 2003 engine.
I slap it on with a buddy but the damn thing wouldn't start.
Days go by until I take it to a mechanic that goes by the name of "Screw" (Cross-eyed). Sits there for about 5 months.
I repo my bike and take it to another Mechanic which manages to get it running in under a day.
What he DIDN'T do was check the state of the engine inside . After a few days of riding that notorious sound was back and my oil light was glitchy. Give the guy a call and says it's all good, just needs oil.
I go for a ride with my girlfriend and for the first time my [email protected] are being roasted from under the seat and my legs feel like I'm wearing Cristo oil in the middle of the Sahara dessert .
I take it back to the Mechanic once it's cooled down, he opens the engine and says " I have bad news" . The engine I bought had been sitting for too long and the oil became a thick paste at the bottom which didn't allow the pump to do its job.
Think it's the end ? No...
He has me order connecting rod bearings which take weeks to arrive, then asks for crankshaft bearrings which is another few weeks.
Then says one of the journals are ovalised...FML .

So now I'm searching the interwebs in search of a whole engine that won't break my bank with cost+shipping.

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post #6 of 21 Old 07-11-2019, 10:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcromo44 View Post
Yes!
Pure and simple interchangeability.
I assumed that, but good to have it confirmed!
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post #7 of 21 Old 07-12-2019, 06:46 AM
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Sinclair thanks for filling us in on your troubles.

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post #8 of 21 Old 07-12-2019, 11:26 AM
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Getting a new engine is one option, but if you open the case, you might find that all you need is bearings and have the crank turned.

Just throwing that out there as one option, but you have to really know what you're doing because chewing up a bearing can damage other things.

I had this happen on a 428 CJ, because I bought the rods ready to go and they weren't machined properly. Cost me over a grand because some shop didn't size the big end of the rods properly and when I checked them, I used plastigage, which doesn't check for round, only for size.

Point: a new set of bearing, turning the crank and gasket set, might be a good option.

Another option is to find another crank with bearings or buy a set of bearing for a new crank.

I point this out because finding a replacement engine and getting it shipped to where ever you are could cost a lot more.

Another option is someone that's wrecked their bike. A lot of wrecked are the front forks smashed in, that should be a good option for a replacement engine and if you buy the whole bike, you get all the spare parts.

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post #9 of 21 Old 07-12-2019, 03:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KarlJay View Post

1
you might find that all you need is bearings and have the crank turned.
Point: a new set of bearing, turning the crank and gasket set, might be a good option.

2
Another option is to find another crank with bearings or buy a set of bearing for a new crank.
Great ideas but Mr. Honda will get in the way.

1
I'm not aware of any undersized bearings for the crank or rod big ends.
If that is the case, then that would only leave hard plating and regrinding to standard size.

2
This is not possible as the engine design precludes it.
Honda has a range of bearings that requires case matching to crank matching.
Each bore has a letter code to indicate it's actual size, not it's nominal design size.
Same re the crank journals.
For example, a casing bearing bore at the large end of allowable tolerance, is coded as a B casing bore.
A crank main at the small end of allowable tolerance, is coded as a 3 journal OD.
A B x 3 combination of actual dimensions triggers the required use of a bearing insert coded as Black.
There are five different inserts each coded as a Colour.
Green is another one, and it covers three combinations.
Black and Pink only cover one combination.
Yellow and Brown cover two combinations.
One can see that the engine designer really made a point of keeping a narrow assembly band of bearing clearances.
Ultimately, a good used crank can be used, but will need a new set of inserts that have been correctly selected for the combination of the actual crank and casing set being used.

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post #10 of 21 Old 07-12-2019, 04:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcromo44 View Post
Great ideas but Mr. Honda will get in the way.

1
I'm not aware of any undersized bearings for the crank or rod big ends.
If that is the case, then that would only leave hard plating and regrinding to standard size.

2
This is not possible as the engine design precludes it.
Honda has a range of bearings that requires case matching to crank matching.
Each bore has a letter code to indicate it's actual size, not it's nominal design size.
Same re the crank journals.
For example, a casing bearing bore at the large end of allowable tolerance, is coded as a B casing bore.
A crank main at the small end of allowable tolerance, is coded as a 3 journal OD.
A B x 3 combination of actual dimensions triggers the required use of a bearing insert coded as Black.
There are five different inserts each coded as a Colour.
Green is another one, and it covers three combinations.
Black and Pink only cover one combination.
Yellow and Brown cover two combinations.
One can see that the engine designer really made a point of keeping a narrow assembly band of bearing clearances.
Ultimately, a good used crank can be used, but will need a new set of inserts that have been correctly selected for the combination of the actual crank and casing set being used.
But you can still do it, meaning if his crank or a purchased crank had known bearing sets, he just buys the new bearings that are needed for that setup.

https://www.bikebandit.com/oem-parts...1093#sch415410

I know it's not as easy as a car/truck where you just say "grind it down 20" and you get one set of bearing 20 over, but you can still do it.

IDK if they micro polish the cranks or not, maybe not if it's treated at the surface, but getting another crank shouldn't be all that hard and should be cheaper than shipping a whole engine.

The other thing is that you would have a "known good" after you break in the new bearings. You don't have to gamble with a different engine.

One other point is that you can replace the oil pump and whatever else while you're in there.

I did a friends Honda car years ago and we had to order a bunch of parts, but he had a great engine after that.

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post #11 of 21 Old 07-12-2019, 06:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KarlJay View Post
But you can still do it, meaning if his crank or a purchased crank had known bearing sets, he just buys the new bearings that are needed for that setup.

https://www.bikebandit.com/oem-parts...1093#sch415410

I know it's not as easy as a car/truck where you just say "grind it down 20" and you get one set of bearing 20 over, but you can still do it.

IDK if they micro polish the cranks or not, maybe not if it's treated at the surface, but getting another crank shouldn't be all that hard and should be cheaper than shipping a whole engine.

The other thing is that you would have a "known good" after you break in the new bearings. You don't have to gamble with a different engine.

One other point is that you can replace the oil pump and whatever else while you're in there.

I did a friends Honda car years ago and we had to order a bunch of parts, but he had a great engine after that.
Agreed.
But also keep in mind that typically once someone has the crank out, they'll already have messed with the pistons meaning the ring positions will have changed, so then honing and rings should also be done.

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post #12 of 21 Old 07-12-2019, 07:43 PM
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Probably easier and cheaper just to buy a good secondhand engine.

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post #13 of 21 Old 07-12-2019, 08:08 PM Thread Starter
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@KarlJay & @mcromo44
Not sure how to reply to both on this forum but I agree with what you both said.
It is possible to just get a crankshaft with the correct bearing codes/colors but I wouldn't mind finding a good deal on a whole engine and having it shipped. The last thing I want is for my Mechanic to tell me that the pistons aren't fitting or the connecting rods aren't the right ones etc..
Think I may opt for a whole engine and have him do a thorough inspection before my crazy ass takes it for a spin .
Any recommended sites on second hand great condition bike engines other than ebay/amazon?

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post #14 of 21 Old 07-12-2019, 11:37 PM
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I had no idea that Amazon would be a source for used motorcycle engines. One thing that comes to mind is that the 919 was not a very common bike, so finding an engine could be a bit of a challenge. If you don't want to go with eBay, I'd say call a recyclers and see if they can do a search for you.

You can also do a CL multi-city search. I think tempest does that.

I know the complete engine sounds tempting, but I just did a quick search and found this:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/2007-02-07-...nd!95820!US!-1

Compare that to this:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/07-HONDA-CB...EAAOSwS9BbhW0d

IDK what the shipping costs are to you, but I'd guess the 1st one would be quite a bit cheaper.

Just at the top, the price difference is some $1,124 shipped in the US vs $170.

That gives you some $950ish dollars to make sure all the bits fit properly. I'd almost guess that you could have the whole thing done for the price of the engine alone.

IDK what the costs are for a tear down and install, but maybe $500 covers that?

All these concerns about things fitting is supposed to be on the shop or person that does the work. They should know enough about what they are doing for this to not be your concern.

I get that good shops are hard to find, that's why I do my own work. Most shops are just too expensive to justify the work.

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post #15 of 21 Old 07-13-2019, 02:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinclair View Post
@KarlJay & @mcromo44

1
It is possible to just get a crankshaft with the correct bearing codes/colors

2
but I wouldn't mind finding a good deal on a whole engine and having it shipped.

3
The last thing I want is for my Mechanic to tell me that the pistons aren't fitting or the connecting rods aren't the right ones etc..
Think I may opt for a whole engine and have him do a thorough inspection before my crazy ass takes it for a spin .

4
Any recommended sites on second hand great condition bike engines other than ebay/amazon?
1
You can easily get a new crank and all the necessary bearing inserts in the correct sizes.
Plus KarlJay showed a link to a used crank plus other stuff, but you'd still need all the necessary bearing inserts in the correct sizes.

2
That could be a good option, and again, KarlJay found one example for you.

3
A
If the pistons are in OK condition, and are within the clearance specs, then they not only are OK, but fit.
As long as they go back in the same cylinder and are oriented the correct way.
B
Rods are not matched for length, or width, or small end size.
Any rod on any piston in any bore on any engine AS LONG as the bearing insert is correctly matched to it and the crank. (same idea as the crank main journal bearing selection procedure)
C
Watch out on how much inspection scope you might ask for, or have insisted upon as a minimum by your mechanic.
The $$$ can too easily start to add up, and make the purchase of the used engine too expensive in terms of total cost.
Point blank, how far does one go internally inspecting a price used engine purchased on the basis of being a good one?

As for sources of good used engines, I don't know of any, but would suggest checking highly reputable
wreckers.
For example, I have had good success for far with SimpsonCycles.com, but it has been over 5 years since I bought anything from them.
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post #16 of 21 Old 07-14-2019, 12:34 PM
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Used engines are a crap shoot considering the fact that the newest engine you can find is at least twelve years old, and of uncertain history.

Since the only major part that needs replacing is the crankshaft, and once the engine is removed from the bike that takes about three hours (that is if the mechanic has a foggy notion what he / she is doing and has all the bearing sizes on hand) including selecting the proper size bearing shells for the main bearings and rod bearings. Having done similar operations in the past i can say it takes some creativity to do efficiently, particularly when dealing with a transmission that wants to stay in the upper case while the shift mechanism is in the lower case, but with the application of imagination tempered by decades of wrenching it is comparatively easy.

Good luck with getting it back on the road.

Rob
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If it has already been done, it is safe to assume it is possible to do it.
On the other hand, if it has not been done never assume it is impossible to do it.
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post #17 of 21 Old 07-14-2019, 04:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robtharalson View Post
Used engines are a crap shoot considering the fact that the newest engine you can find is at least twelve years old, and of uncertain history.

Since the only major part that needs replacing is the crankshaft, and once the engine is removed from the bike that takes about three hours (that is if the mechanic has a foggy notion what he / she is doing and has all the bearing sizes on hand) including selecting the proper size bearing shells for the main bearings and rod bearings. Having done similar operations in the past i can say it takes some creativity to do efficiently, particularly when dealing with a transmission that wants to stay in the upper case while the shift mechanism is in the lower case, but with the application of imagination tempered by decades of wrenching it is comparatively easy.

Good luck with getting it back on the road.

Rob
Rob,

How would you deal with the piston/rod assemblies?
Attempt to leave them in?
Remove them, and if so, ridge ream, hone and rering?
Assuming all dimensions justified just a hone and rering.

Any added commentary you likely have would be great to see.
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post #18 of 21 Old 07-15-2019, 12:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcromo44 View Post
Rob,

How would you deal with the piston/rod assemblies?
Attempt to leave them in?
Remove them, and if so, ridge ream, hone and rering?
Assuming all dimensions justified just a hone and rering.

Any added commentary you likely have would be great to see.
I'll give you the Cliff Notes version as I have not done this on a 919 motor ... yet.
-- Once the motor has had all fluids drained and all the ancillary parts removed (exhaust, throttle bodies, chain, and all electrical connectors disconnected) pull the oil pan and clean it out thoroughly, then reinstall with four bolts.
-- Remove the engine and place it upright on a solid work surface. Remove the spark plugs and stuff rags in the open holes. Loosen all upper case bolts in a crisscross pattern and remove, clean, and bag and tag for reassembly. Look for copper sealing washers and note their location.
-- Remove the alternator, clutch, timing covers, and the alternator rotor. Remove the crankshaft right side bolt retaining the sensor wheel and cam drive sprocket. Remove the sensor wheel. The sprocket will be removed later.
-- Turn the motor over to expose the rest of the case bolts. Remove the oil pan: there are several case bolts exposed. Break loose all the case bolts in a crisscross pattern, then remove them. My preference is to tie the transmission shafts to the lower case to maintain the connection to the oil pump / water pump driveshaft. Saves time by obviating the necessity of removing the clutch assembly. You're ready to split the cases.
-- Since the cases have been together for a very long time and will be reluctant to separate go slow and find jacking points in preference to using a hammer! Once it's broken loose remove the lower case.
-- Once the crankshaft is exposed turn it until all rod caps are accessible. Break all rod cap nuts loose but do not remove them at this time. Rotate the crank until cylinders 2 and 3 are at bottom dead center, then remove the nuts on those rods and caps/bearings. CAREFULLY MARK THE CAPS AND NUTS FOR REINSTALLATION ON THEIR RESPECTIVE RODS! Slip eight inch long pieces of rubber hose over the exposed rod studs to protect the crank and bores, then turn the crank 180 degrees to access the caps for 1 and 4. The two you have already done will be pushed down in their bores. Repeat the cap removal for the rods.
-- Retract the cam chain tensioner plunger, then remove the tensioner. Clean all oil from the sprocket and camchain and make a reference mark on both for reassembly. Rotate the crank until both runs of the chain are loose -- there will probably be enough slack in the chain to allow removal of the sprocket. Make sure to tie the chain to the case to prevent it disappearing into the chain case, and hopefully keep the chain tensioned to maintain the timing of the cam sprockets. If the timing chain slips a tooth on either sprocket, trust me you will hear it, the cam cover will have to be removed to retime the cams. Remove the crankshaft.

-- From here it is a matter of sizing the main bearing shells to give the proper oil clearance by using the codes stamped on the engine case, the replacement crankshaft, and connecting rods. Once the new main bearing shells are oiled an installed in both cases drop in the crank and place a length of Plastigage on each main journal and install the lower case and torque to specification. Recommended clearance is 0.0007 to 0.0014 inch (0.017 to 0.035 mm), with a maximum clearance is 0.002 inch (0.05mm). Shoot for the middle of the range. Usually there is little necessity for redoing the bearing clearance, but you never know. Always check!

--Next, the rods. With the crank out oil and place the new bearing shells on the rods / caps, carefully place the crank, then install the caps on rods 1 and 4 and cinch down the nuts. Starting with the #2 and #3 rods place the plastigage on the journals, and install the rod caps. Once you have the clearance right clean off the journals of any gauge strip, oil everything, and install and torque the caps.
At this time loop the camchain over the crank stub and install the crank sprocket, matching the marks you made during disassembly. Install the tensioner but do not release the plunger. Rotate the crank 180 degrees, remove the caps on #1 and #4, and repeat the clearance check. Once the clearances are right put the motor back together.

Use Honda Bond only to seal the cases, and everything else for that matter. it is the best sealant I have ever used by far. Pricey, but definitely worth it.

I learned this from a Honda Racing tech, and have used it many times, once the night before a six hour endurance race when the oil pump bypass stuck open and scored several main bearings, thankfully without spinning them. Starting when we got a new crank from a salvage and assurance from the shop owner sponsoring us that he had all the parts we would need I dived in around 11 PM and had it ready to go back in the frame by 2:30 AM. We put the bike back together and fired it up. Having not slept for 48 hours, and with only an hour left before the start of the race I suited up in time for the usual "testing it out after a major problem the day before" practice, shook it out thoroughly, and did my usual Zen routine to get ready for the race. It went the distance with me doing ~70% of the riding, and we finished second in our class and fourth overall. Not bad at all.

Slept for the next 20 hours. Needed to.

Rob
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post #19 of 21 Old 07-15-2019, 01:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robtharalson View Post
I'll give you the Cliff Notes version as I have not done this on a 919 motor ... yet.
-- Once the motor has had all fluids drained and all the ancillary parts removed (exhaust, throttle bodies, chain, and all electrical connectors disconnected) pull the oil pan and clean it out thoroughly, then reinstall with four bolts.
-- Remove the engine and place it upright on a solid work surface. Remove the spark plugs and stuff rags in the open holes. Loosen all upper case bolts in a crisscross pattern and remove, clean, and bag and tag for reassembly. Look for copper sealing washers and note their location.
-- Remove the alternator, clutch, timing covers, and the alternator rotor. Remove the crankshaft right side bolt retaining the sensor wheel and cam drive sprocket. Remove the sensor wheel. The sprocket will be removed later.
-- Turn the motor over to expose the rest of the case bolts. Remove the oil pan: there are several case bolts exposed. Break loose all the case bolts in a crisscross pattern, then remove them. My preference is to tie the transmission shafts to the lower case to maintain the connection to the oil pump / water pump driveshaft. Saves time by obviating the necessity of removing the clutch assembly. You're ready to split the cases.
-- Since the cases have been together for a very long time and will be reluctant to separate go slow and find jacking points in preference to using a hammer! Once it's broken loose remove the lower case.
-- Once the crankshaft is exposed turn it until all rod caps are accessible. Break all rod cap nuts loose but do not remove them at this time. Rotate the crank until cylinders 2 and 3 are at bottom dead center, then remove the nuts on those rods and caps/bearings. CAREFULLY MARK THE CAPS AND NUTS FOR REINSTALLATION ON THEIR RESPECTIVE RODS! Slip eight inch long pieces of rubber hose over the exposed rod studs to protect the crank and bores, then turn the crank 180 degrees to access the caps for 1 and 4. The two you have already done will be pushed down in their bores. Repeat the cap removal for the rods.
-- Retract the cam chain tensioner plunger, then remove the tensioner. Clean all oil from the sprocket and camchain and make a reference mark on both for reassembly. Rotate the crank until both runs of the chain are loose -- there will probably be enough slack in the chain to allow removal of the sprocket. Make sure to tie the chain to the case to prevent it disappearing into the chain case, and hopefully keep the chain tensioned to maintain the timing of the cam sprockets. If the timing chain slips a tooth on either sprocket, trust me you will hear it, the cam cover will have to be removed to retime the cams. Remove the crankshaft.

-- From here it is a matter of sizing the main bearing shells to give the proper oil clearance by using the codes stamped on the engine case, the replacement crankshaft, and connecting rods. Once the new main bearing shells are oiled an installed in both cases drop in the crank and place a length of Plastigage on each main journal and install the lower case and torque to specification. Recommended clearance is 0.0007 to 0.0014 inch (0.017 to 0.035 mm), with a maximum clearance is 0.002 inch (0.05mm). Shoot for the middle of the range. Usually there is little necessity for redoing the bearing clearance, but you never know. Always check!

--Next, the rods. With the crank out oil and place the new bearing shells on the rods / caps, carefully place the crank, then install the caps on rods 1 and 4 and cinch down the nuts. Starting with the #2 and #3 rods place the plastigage on the journals, and install the rod caps. Once you have the clearance right clean off the journals of any gauge strip, oil everything, and install and torque the caps.
At this time loop the camchain over the crank stub and install the crank sprocket, matching the marks you made during disassembly. Install the tensioner but do not release the plunger. Rotate the crank 180 degrees, remove the caps on #1 and #4, and repeat the clearance check. Once the clearances are right put the motor back together.

Use Honda Bond only to seal the cases, and everything else for that matter. it is the best sealant I have ever used by far. Pricey, but definitely worth it.

I learned this from a Honda Racing tech, and have used it many times, once the night before a six hour endurance race when the oil pump bypass stuck open and scored several main bearings, thankfully without spinning them. Starting when we got a new crank from a salvage and assurance from the shop owner sponsoring us that he had all the parts we would need I dived in around 11 PM and had it ready to go back in the frame by 2:30 AM. We put the bike back together and fired it up. Having not slept for 48 hours, and with only an hour left before the start of the race I suited up in time for the usual "testing it out after a major problem the day before" practice, shook it out thoroughly, and did my usual Zen routine to get ready for the race. It went the distance with me doing ~70% of the riding, and we finished second in our class and fourth overall. Not bad at all.

Slept for the next 20 hours. Needed to.

Rob
Rob,
Thanks for taking the time to do the superlative write-up.
Sinclair's mechanic can therefore put in a new crank, and all new rod big end inserts if found necessary, without disrupting the pistons, save $$, and remain with a known entity.

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post #20 of 21 Old 07-18-2019, 07:37 AM Thread Starter
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Rob,
Thanks for taking the time to do the superlative write-up.
Sinclair's mechanic can therefore put in a new crank, and all new rod big end inserts if found necessary, without disrupting the pistons, save $$, and remain with a known entity.
Well thank you all for the very detailed explanations. I truly understand a bit more about the engine components but feel no where near confident in doing it myself.
As far as my Mechanic goes...
He's disassembled and reassembled the engine at least twice already and I'm sure he could do it a few more times with his eyes closed.
I'm a bit hesitant with him at the moment because after waiting weeks for the bearings to arrive, then a few days for him to reassemble (he works on the side for me $). It then turns out that one of the journals are ovalised.
Could this have been an oversight on his end when measuring?
If so, I could buy a crankshaft with the pistons, shell bearing, rods, piston heads. Which would just be a plug n play, then assemble if I understand correctly.


Or... I could break the bank a bit and ship an already assembled functioning engine for him to install and change the oil/filter/spark plugs.




Below are links to items I've seen via Ebay.


https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?m...2F302861783005

https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?m...2F183790655534


https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?m...2F153210276567


https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?m...2F391669371925

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post #21 of 21 Old 07-18-2019, 07:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinclair View Post
Well thank you all for the very detailed explanations. I truly understand a bit more about the engine components but feel no where near confident in doing it myself.
As far as my Mechanic goes...
He's disassembled and reassembled the engine at least twice already and I'm sure he could do it a few more times with his eyes closed.
I'm a bit hesitant with him at the moment because after waiting weeks for the bearings to arrive, then a few days for him to reassemble (he works on the side for me $). It then turns out that one of the journals are ovalised.
Could this have been an oversight on his end when measuring?
If so, I could buy a crankshaft with the pistons, shell bearing, rods, piston heads. Which would just be a plug n play, then assemble if I understand correctly.


Or... I could break the bank a bit and ship an already assembled functioning engine for him to install and change the oil/filter/spark plugs.




Below are links to items I've seen via Ebay.


https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?m...2F302861783005

https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?m...2F183790655534


https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?m...2F153210276567


https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?m...2F391669371925
If I could satisfy myself that a used engine is a totally complete bonafide runner in good shape, in mind it's a no brainer to go that route.

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