919 electrical rework - Wrist Twisters
 
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post #1 of 13 Old 12-18-2014, 02:09 PM Thread Starter
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919 electrical rework

So a while back my turn signals stopped working and the headlight as well. I took the 9er to the shop and it turns out that the controls were just horribly dirty and caused some electrical issues. He just cleaned out the left controls and then both turn signals and headlight ran.

While at work, I keep my bike in the parking lot outside. Being in Vancouver it's been raining the whole week. Yesterday when I arrived home I noticed that my headlight wasn't work, I didn't even notice that I was riding around town without a head light. I fiddled with the switches and the light works now again.

It got me thinking... When my mechanic debugged my electrical issue the first time arround, he poked his nose arround the fuse area and he said that the electrics on the bike are horrible. Apparently he found some household internet cable used for whatever thing in the back. Probably used for the integrated stop and turn signals in the back.

Would it be worth getting all my electricals on my bike checked and changed/upgraded with new wires and cables ? If yes any improvements that could be made?

Thanks!!

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post #2 of 13 Old 12-18-2014, 02:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ewmin3m View Post
So a while back my turn signals stopped working and the headlight as well. I took the 9er to the shop and it turns out that the controls were just horribly dirty and caused some electrical issues. He just cleaned out the left controls and then both turn signals and headlight ran.

While at work, I keep my bike in the parking lot outside. Being in Vancouver it's been raining the whole week. Yesterday when I arrived home I noticed that my headlight wasn't work, I didn't even notice that I was riding around town without a head light. I fiddled with the switches and the light works now again.

It got me thinking... When my mechanic debugged my electrical issue the first time arround, he poked his nose arround the fuse area and he said that the electrics on the bike are horrible. Apparently he found some household internet cable used for whatever thing in the back. Probably used for the integrated stop and turn signals in the back.

Would it be worth getting all my electricals on my bike checked and changed/upgraded with new wires and cables ? If yes any improvements that could be made?

Thanks!!
Changing out a full harness on a 919 would be very expensive parts wise and fairly labor intensive.

Do u have a garage or spot u can work on the bike yourself?

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post #3 of 13 Old 12-18-2014, 02:35 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by HeliMech View Post
Changing out a full harness on a 919 would be very expensive parts wise and fairly labor intensive.

Do u have a garage or spot u can work on the bike yourself?
I figured No I don't. I live in an apartment building. And while I keep my bike in the garage I wouldn't feel comfortable opening her up for all to see.

I guess I could just focus on solving the left control lighting issues...

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post #4 of 13 Old 12-19-2014, 05:35 AM
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I replaced my starter and throttle housing with one off of a newer cbr600. Problem solved for the head light solder breakage (which is very common on the 919)

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post #5 of 13 Old 12-19-2014, 10:54 AM Thread Starter
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I replaced my starter and throttle housing with one off of a newer cbr600. Problem solved for the head light solder breakage (which is very common on the 919)
hmm good to know. aren't the headlight wires to the housing on the left side? since thats where the turn signal switch is and the headlight button ?

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post #6 of 13 Old 12-19-2014, 01:19 PM
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hmm good to know. aren't the headlight wires to the housing on the left side? since thats where the turn signal switch is and the headlight button ?
Yeah, but the starter button has a function that turns off the headlight drain momentarily while the starter turns the engine over....

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post #7 of 13 Old 12-19-2014, 04:50 PM
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And it is that one That breaks all of the time

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post #8 of 13 Old 12-20-2014, 04:41 AM
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Unless there has been significant modification done to the harness there is no need to replace it. Usually trouble is caused by, in order:
1 -- Modifications done by someone who has little experience with wiring.
2 -- Switches.
3 -- Connectors.
4 -- And last the harness chafing against something on the frame causing damage to wires.

Remediation:
1 -- A process called "returning it to zero". In other words removing any modifications done, repairing any wires compromised during the modifications, and making sure all repairs are sufficiently insulated to prevent problems in the future.

2 -- Using WD-40, with the key off spray liberally into a switch while operating it. This flushes out most contamination and lubricates the mechanism. I do this as part of an oil change, and any time it has been left out in / ridden in the rain for any significant period. 70,000 + miles and no problems with any switches. Pay particular attention to the function of the brake light switches: they are prone to early failure and the last thing you want is to get rear ended by a car because of a defective switch!

3 -- Water migrating into connectors will cause corrosion and eventual loss of function. To prevent this obtain a tube of dielectric grease from practically any auto parts store and apply it as follows: unplug connector blocks, clean out any obvious dirt and / or water from both sides, squeeze a liberal amount of grease into the socket well, and plug it back together. The grease will extrude through the connector and make a mess which you can wipe off as soon as it's locked together. This absolutely excludes water and prevents corrosion. Don't worry -- it will not interfere with making a proper connection in any way. This can also be applied to battery connections, fuses, and the ground lugs bolted to the frame. Pay particular attention to high current connectors at the starter relay, rectifier / regulator, and ignition switch. About the only place it can't be used is on light bulb bases: the heat from the bulb will eventually break down the grease. Like this:BWD CL75 - Tool / Chemical | O'Reilly Auto Parts

4 -- Inspect the harness for proximity to any sharp objects (Unusual for a completely stock system, but if modifications have been done you never know!) and move the harness away from it or wrap it to protect it.

It's not as bad as it sounds: a couple of evenings work should be sufficient to prevent further problems.

Rob

If it has already been done, it is safe to assume it is possible to do it.
On the other hand, if it has not been done never assume it is impossible to do it.
------- Rob --------
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post #9 of 13 Old 12-20-2014, 09:10 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robtharalson View Post
Unless there has been significant modification done to the harness there is no need to replace it. Usually trouble is caused by, in order:
1 -- Modifications done by someone who has little experience with wiring.
2 -- Switches.
3 -- Connectors.
4 -- And last the harness chafing against something on the frame causing damage to wires.

Remediation:
1 -- A process called "returning it to zero". In other words removing any modifications done, repairing any wires compromised during the modifications, and making sure all repairs are sufficiently insulated to prevent problems in the future.

2 -- Using WD-40, with the key off spray liberally into a switch while operating it. This flushes out most contamination and lubricates the mechanism. I do this as part of an oil change, and any time it has been left out in / ridden in the rain for any significant period. 70,000 + miles and no problems with any switches. Pay particular attention to the function of the brake light switches: they are prone to early failure and the last thing you want is to get rear ended by a car because of a defective switch!

3 -- Water migrating into connectors will cause corrosion and eventual loss of function. To prevent this obtain a tube of dielectric grease from practically any auto parts store and apply it as follows: unplug connector blocks, clean out any obvious dirt and / or water from both sides, squeeze a liberal amount of grease into the socket well, and plug it back together. The grease will extrude through the connector and make a mess which you can wipe off as soon as it's locked together. This absolutely excludes water and prevents corrosion. Don't worry -- it will not interfere with making a proper connection in any way. This can also be applied to battery connections, fuses, and the ground lugs bolted to the frame. Pay particular attention to high current connectors at the starter relay, rectifier / regulator, and ignition switch. About the only place it can't be used is on light bulb bases: the heat from the bulb will eventually break down the grease. Like this:BWD CL75 - Tool / Chemical | O'Reilly Auto Parts

4 -- Inspect the harness for proximity to any sharp objects (Unusual for a completely stock system, but if modifications have been done you never know!) and move the harness away from it or wrap it to protect it.

It's not as bad as it sounds: a couple of evenings work should be sufficient to prevent further problems.

Rob
Thanks for the info I love this forum

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post #10 of 13 Old 12-20-2014, 09:24 AM
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Food for thought:

From the February, 2015, issue of MOTORCYCLIST in the MC GARAGE column:

"... Finally, remember the three most common causes of electrical problems are (1) grounds, (2) grounds, and (3) grounds."

"Keep on 9-in"

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post #11 of 13 Old 12-20-2014, 05:05 PM
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As an electrician we joke "no grounds no problems". Although I have been to buildings where others will lift the ground on the fire alarm system to avoid the ground fault trouble if there is one present. Then it is fun finding it...

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post #12 of 13 Old 12-22-2014, 10:13 AM
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Originally Posted by boogunoogun View Post
As an electrician we joke "no grounds no problems". Although I have been to buildings where others will lift the ground on the fire alarm system to avoid the ground fault trouble if there is one present. Then it is fun finding it...
When the structure burns down and there's nothing left standing except the plumbing and wiring it'll be easy to spot.

"Keep on 9-in"

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post #13 of 13 Old 12-22-2014, 12:08 PM
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That must be their thinking. People are real dumb.

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