919 axle torque - Wrist Twisters
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post #1 of 15 Old 07-18-2018, 06:33 PM Thread Starter
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919 axle torque

Had the rear tire on my 919 off for balancing, got it back on and chain tightened/aligned - left side is 5 notches back and right side is 4/5 notches back - rear sprocket teeth sitting dead center on the chain after spinning the tire - was off when I had both sides at 5 notches back. Torqued the axle nut to 59 ft/lbs.


I read on this forum that the torque spec in the manual of 69 is too tight. My question is, will 59 be tight enough? As of right now, the tires spins very well and the bearings are not binding. But I'm going to be worried and checking like crazy to see if it comes loose or starts to mis-align.


Thoughts?

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post #2 of 15 Old 07-18-2018, 06:46 PM
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I like to measure from the swing arm pivot to the center of the axle bolt. The swing arm notches can be wrong. I could be doing it wrong, as I often seem to be when it comes to bike maintenence, so take my opinion with a grain of salt.

I like to torque to 69 just because it makes me giggle a little. 46k miles and it seems to be fine.

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post #3 of 15 Old 07-18-2018, 07:11 PM
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The factory value is for dry threads, dry nut and dry washer.
You are wise to back off on the torque if threads have anything lube like on any or all of the aforementioned.

Dry torqued, the factory value should be OK.
No way are the inner races ever going to get crushed by that value.
Keep in mind that if the Outer Race registers in the hubs are correct, the bearings will not be excessively preload by the axle clamping through the inner stack.
(I figure the cumulative tolerance is such that the bearings can see some non problematic light preload at most.)
The inner stack is reliant upon the inner races of the wheel bearings.
The outer races should not be involved, and if they are, something is wrong with the register into which they fit.

Also keep in mind that lower quality click type torque wrenches with a high capacity compared to the required torque value, to easily do NOT yield accurate and repeatable tightening.
A typical +/- 4% error click type 150 ft. lb. capacity wrench is allowed to indicate 69 ft. lb even though it could actually be high or low by 4 %. So, an oily greasy axle/washer/nut could be seeing 72 ft. lb. while only needing less than 50 ft. lb. Dry parts also help reduce any tendency of a rear wheel to cock in the swing arm.

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post #4 of 15 Old 07-18-2018, 07:32 PM
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The stock axle nut is one of those lock types, it won't work its way loose.
Also set you chain adjusters on opposite lock so under power your axle/wheel doesn't shift. Stops the chain from pulling that side closer to engine. My wheel hasn't shifted once since doing that.

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post #5 of 15 Old 07-18-2018, 07:53 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Islandboy View Post
The stock axle nut is one of those lock types, it won't work its way loose.
Also set you chain adjusters on opposite lock so under power your axle/wheel doesn't shift. Stops the chain from pulling that side closer to engine. My wheel hasn't shifted once since doing that.

What do you mean by 'set chain adjusters on opposite lock'?

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post #6 of 15 Old 07-18-2018, 08:04 PM
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I think he means, make sure they are tight to the swing arm after you set the alightment so that they prevent the wheel from being yanked into the swing arm

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post #7 of 15 Old 07-18-2018, 08:21 PM
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This might help.
https://www.wristtwisters.com/forums...ad.php?t=76929
After you set the chain tension, wheel alignment and tighten axle bolt do this.
The chain adjuster on the chain side is set to pull and the adjuster on the brake side is set to push. This way they oppose the force the chain puts on the rear axle when under power. Chain torque tries to pull the sprockets together.
I had some axle slippage and chain becoming loose prior to setting my adjusters this way. No movement now.

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post #8 of 15 Old 07-18-2018, 08:54 PM Thread Starter
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ok got it...after aligning the chain and torquing the axle nut, set the sprocket side adjuster to slightly 'pull' mode and disc brake side to slightly 'push' mode.


All good, except I can't remember which way to turn the adjusters to push and which way to turn to pull?


I'm thinking it was counter clockwise for pull and clockwise for push...?

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post #9 of 15 Old 07-18-2018, 09:26 PM
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Yes that's it. Counter clockwise to set adjuster to pull and clockwise to push. You'll notice a bit of slack in the adjuster when you do so. Take up the slack and tighten those adjusters, they have a habit of coming loose. Don't go crazy when you set them tight, you don't want to strip the threads or move the axle just bed 'em in tight so they don't come loose while riding. You'll get the hang of it. Good luck.
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post #10 of 15 Old 07-18-2018, 09:30 PM Thread Starter
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Perfect...thanks all for your help!

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post #11 of 15 Old 07-18-2018, 09:51 PM
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No worries bro.

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post #12 of 15 Old 07-19-2018, 05:43 AM Thread Starter
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Rode to work this morning (about 25 Km's). Checked when I got to work and all is good!

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post #13 of 15 Old 07-19-2018, 07:57 AM
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Stock torques are almost all stupid high for axle nuts... especially after they've been used and dirtied etc etc... the spec on my GSXR is something crazy like 98 ft lbs... I used to torque all of them to around 50... now I've changed the wheel so much I just use my calibrated arm and its usually something around 50 when I've checked it.

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post #14 of 15 Old 07-19-2018, 10:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by badmoon692008 View Post
Stock torques are almost all stupid high for axle nuts... especially after they've been used and dirtied etc etc... the spec on my GSXR is something crazy like 98 ft lbs... I used to torque all of them to around 50... now I've changed the wheel so much I just use my calibrated arm and its usually something around 50 when I've checked it.
I hear you re the 98 ft lb but for a 919, 69 ft lb is not a high number for the diameter, pitch, thread form, material, and the composition of the component stack.
Having said that though, 69 needs to be seen as the dry number, as compared to my guessing most having at least an oil film on the relevant surfaces.

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post #15 of 15 Old 12-05-2018, 05:25 PM
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