What tool to cut handlebars with? - Wrist Twisters
 
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post #1 of 15 Old 03-12-2012, 09:28 PM Thread Starter
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What tool to cut handlebars with?

I just purchased a set of Renthal low bars and plan to mount them. I will cut them down to the OEM width. What is everyone using to cut the bars with? hacksaw?

the aluminum is quite thick, how do you insure the cut is straight, and do you file it down afterwards (to remove sharp edges)


thanks,
Chris

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post #2 of 15 Old 03-12-2012, 09:30 PM
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I've used a standard tubing cutter - the wheel kind you clamp on and rotate around and around.

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post #3 of 15 Old 03-12-2012, 09:38 PM
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post #4 of 15 Old 03-12-2012, 09:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CB700S View Post
I've used a standard tubing cutter - the wheel kind you clamp on and rotate around and around.
That's what I would use. It will give you a nice square cut.

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post #5 of 15 Old 03-12-2012, 11:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CB700S View Post
I've used a standard tubing cutter - the wheel kind you clamp on and rotate around and around.
+1000 works like a charm. And cheap.

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post #6 of 15 Old 03-13-2012, 12:10 AM
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You might want to get a rats tail file. Those tubing cutters leave a small lip on the pipe that might interfere with certain bar ends. Key word might. Not 100% sure it will interfere, i just know they leave a lip

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post #7 of 15 Old 03-13-2012, 12:16 AM
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Hacksaw and clean up with a file. Piece of piss!

If you wrap a piece of tape around the line you want to cut on it gives you a nice line to cut against.

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post #8 of 15 Old 03-13-2012, 12:19 AM
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Quote:
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Hacksaw and clean up with a file. Piece of piss!

If you wrap a piece of tape around the line you want to cut on it gives you a nice line to cut against.
problem is if the op is anything like me.... i couldnt cut a straight line with a hacksaw to save my life haha.

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post #9 of 15 Old 03-13-2012, 02:26 AM
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I used a metal bandsaw worked great. Never thought to use a tubing cutter, not a bad Idea.



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post #10 of 15 Old 03-13-2012, 10:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CB700S View Post
I've used a standard tubing cutter - the wheel kind you clamp on and rotate around and around.
Me too, just take it slow.

This gives a very clean cut and dressing the burr on the inside is no big deal.


Word of caution:
It is possible to start cutting a spiral up the bar.
Be sure to get the tubing cutter on the bar SQUARE, and rotate it back & forth rather than one direction only.

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post #11 of 15 Old 03-13-2012, 04:14 PM Thread Starter
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Nice idea, think I will go the tube cutter route.
thanks everyone!

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post #12 of 15 Old 03-13-2012, 05:07 PM
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post #13 of 15 Old 03-13-2012, 05:45 PM
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Brother, do I cut a lot of tubing! There are a variety of ways to cut steel tubing. My preferred method is to mark the point where you want the cut to be and tighten a small hose clamp around the tube there. It will automatically center itself and gives you a good square edge to mark all the way around the tube with a fine Sharpie. Then, clamp the tube gently in a vice with padded jaws and using a sidewinder (right angle disc grinder) with an abrasive cutoff wheel, simply cut the tube a small amount at a time, rotating the tube in the vice, and continue the cut. Be sure to leave a little extra for smoothing out the cut with a bench grinder or hand file. A cutoff wheel, however, will load up with aluminum and stop cutting, so is not preferred for this application.

A pipe cutter will also work, at least I think it would work on the aluminum of the renthal bars, but never having done it I can't be sure. Generally, I use a hacksaw after marking it as above. At least it takes less time with a file to smooth out the cut compared to steel.

Most importantly, fit your controls to the bar before cutting! Don't assume removing a certain amount will give you what you need. Remember the fabricators number one rule: "It's a helluva lot easier to remove material than add it." Less expensive too.

Rob

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post #14 of 15 Old 03-13-2012, 06:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stutz View Post
Use a hose clamp as a guide and cut it with a hack saw.
Great idea!

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post #15 of 15 Old 03-13-2012, 07:10 PM
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I used a tubing cutter for thirty years but now I use a saw guide made by Park tools...it's faster, cleaner and hacksaw blades are cheaper to replace than cutting wheels.
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