Mirrors - solved - Wrist Twisters
 
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post #1 of 8 Old 05-23-2017, 02:10 PM Thread Starter
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Mirrors - solved

A quick search of the forum yielded only 1,271 results on mirror-related threads, so I figured what's one more.

The stock mirrors are a decent comprise of field of vision (blind spot) and clarity of what's behind you, but they don't do either task very well. Plus they're super ugly.

I think I've finally settled on a fix I'm happy with.

Step 1: get replacement mirrors that are adjustable, sufficiently wide, and fairly flat (i.e. not convex). Any kind will do, they don't have to be titanium drilled ceramic coated $129 mirrors.
Step 2: spend $6 at Auto Zone for two small convex mirrors, with double-sided tape, *that can be angled*.

Solution: adjust the *main* mirrors so that they clearly show you what is behind you, i.e. "rear-view mirror mode". When you do this, about half of the mirrored surface will now be your own reflection. This is the wasted space of the mirror, and you can then utilize that wasted space to place the blind-spot convex mirrors - angled out - to show you your blind spot.

Now I have the best of both worlds: I can see what is directly behind me, and I can check my blind spots on either side without having to lean forward.

Pics attached.
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post #2 of 8 Old 05-23-2017, 06:29 PM
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I'm surprised no one has come up with a "convex" outward mirror for motorcycles that have a slight curving arch.
so's not to have that damn blind spot. Sure it'll distort the FOV a bit but hell, whats better, blind spot or FOV distorted a little and you can see further around the edge?

I hear the "bar end" mirrors are what to have on motorcycle cause they stick out as far past the bars AND you can see further.
I had them on a bike I once had, they worked well.

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Location: Shambhala
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post #3 of 8 Old 05-24-2017, 03:11 AM
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I ran 2" convex mirrors on my other bike and it was great. I drove a Ford SuperDuty that had the dual mirrors. A standard one and a convex full width... that's what would be even better, but your's seems to be a very good fit. Mine was round in square, but still worked well.

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post #4 of 8 Old 05-24-2017, 03:57 AM
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I'm young, dumb and full of...well, long story short, I don't mind leaning forward an inch to check my blind spot. Current mirrors are like 6 inches wide is basically non-existent.

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post #5 of 8 Old 05-24-2017, 01:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nathanktm View Post
I'm young, dumb and full of...well, long story short, I don't mind leaning forward an inch to check my blind spot. Current mirrors are like 6 inches wide is basically non-existent.
I usually like the forward lean unless the ride is really long. The thing about having a dual mirror is that you get instant / constant views. If you're sitting at a red light, you can see more of what's going on without having to move. It's not about can it be replaced with something else, it's about making it right there all the time. You kinda have to use a dual mirror system to really understand how much better it is. I drove a truck for a living years ago and having those dual mirrors really made a difference. Notice how most every big rig has them... there's a reason for that.

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post #6 of 8 Old 05-24-2017, 01:27 PM
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I've tried using those "dual" mirrors, smaller round convex mirror glued on the flat mirror as you have it.
I found it to be "distracting" per say.
Reason being.....it's hard to keep track of 1) whats in your line of site on the convex mirror and 2) the flat mirror wont show you all the way around your elbow/corner.
So it becomes a bit of a chore to determine just which portion of the mirror to focus on...the convex part or the flat part. Dunno....I'm sure truckers learn to use them perfectly well and get use to the sense of distorted space behind and learn how best to judge if an objects pops in the line of site but just dunno.....

I think on a motorccycle, just turn-head check and you'll be fine.

VintageHunter
Location: Shambhala
"always looking for that next find".
1984 Yamaha Seca 400
1984 Honda CB125
1987 Yamaha RZ350
Various Yamaha YSR50, YSR200, YSR80
1986 Honda 500 Interceptor
1998 Yamaha R1 (first original R1)
2006 Kawasaki Ninja 250
1997 Kawasaki ZX7
1989 Honda GT650 Hawk
1989 Honda CB-1
2007 Honda 919
2001 Honda CBR F4i

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post #7 of 8 Old 05-25-2017, 12:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VintageHunter View Post
I've tried using those "dual" mirrors, smaller round convex mirror glued on the flat mirror as you have it.
I found it to be "distracting" per say.
Reason being.....it's hard to keep track of 1) whats in your line of site on the convex mirror and 2) the flat mirror wont show you all the way around your elbow/corner.
So it becomes a bit of a chore to determine just which portion of the mirror to focus on...the convex part or the flat part. Dunno....I'm sure truckers learn to use them perfectly well and get use to the sense of distorted space behind and learn how best to judge if an objects pops in the line of site but just dunno.....

I think on a motorccycle, just turn-head check and you'll be fine.
Like most things, you get used to them. Like bifocal glasses or manual vs auto tranny. Some can't imaging driving a stick shift car, other's can't imagine driving an auto. I kept putting my foot where I thought the clutch pedal was...

With the dual mirrors, I almost always use the convex for a quick glance. Remember, you don't have to look at something to see it. You look towards something and you see it. The problem with being on a bike is that the 120 deg of peripheral vision isn't enough. The more forward you are, the more you'd probably want the convex.

Basically you look for movement in one and details in the other. Takes a while, but it's pretty effective. It would only cost you $4 for a stick on pair from Harbor Freight... they come off with a razor blade if you change your mind.

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post #8 of 8 Old 05-25-2017, 05:13 PM
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I suppose you could get used to just bout anything, a broken shoe, a hole in your sox, wet soggy feet after running in the rain...but why?
I mean..if there other better ways to view your back...then so be it.

I'm just raising the question that those convex mirror (to me) somehow distract my concentration and sight lines...but hey, that's what makes China great....they keep producing bad stuff for dirt cheap and we keep buying them
Quote:
Originally Posted by KarlJay View Post
Like most things, you get used to them. Like bifocal glasses or manual vs auto tranny. Some can't imaging driving a stick shift car, other's can't imagine driving an auto. I kept putting my foot where I thought the clutch pedal was...

With the dual mirrors, I almost always use the convex for a quick glance. Remember, you don't have to look at something to see it. You look towards something and you see it. The problem with being on a bike is that the 120 deg of peripheral vision isn't enough. The more forward you are, the more you'd probably want the convex.

Basically you look for movement in one and details in the other. Takes a while, but it's pretty effective. It would only cost you $4 for a stick on pair from Harbor Freight... they come off with a razor blade if you change your mind.

VintageHunter
Location: Shambhala
"always looking for that next find".
1984 Yamaha Seca 400
1984 Honda CB125
1987 Yamaha RZ350
Various Yamaha YSR50, YSR200, YSR80
1986 Honda 500 Interceptor
1998 Yamaha R1 (first original R1)
2006 Kawasaki Ninja 250
1997 Kawasaki ZX7
1989 Honda GT650 Hawk
1989 Honda CB-1
2007 Honda 919
2001 Honda CBR F4i

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