gettingn a 919 ready for wet/cold riding - Wrist Twisters
 
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post #1 of 22 Old 09-07-2014, 02:46 PM Thread Starter
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gettingn a 919 ready for wet/cold riding

Hello all,
I am looking to get my 919 ready for the fall riding season up here in the northeast. Short of tire chains/studs and a christini 2 wheel drive conversion, I was thinking of a front fender extender, a windscreen, and maybe heated grips/gloves/hippogrips/barkbusters. I am not a stranger to riding in the cold and have the gear (jacket, pants, boots, etc.) for it. This will be my first time doing it on this bike, and I am looking for some advice.

Here are my questions:
Do people have any real world experience with the different front fender extenders? I like the look of the Bluebird engineering carbon fiber front fender extender, but the pyramid plastics one looks like it might be longer and maybe more effective?

Windscreen is really just to protect the bike. I like the look of the puig that was posted recently. A buell M2 screen is on the short list too. The f16 in the classifieds is interesting as well. Any experience?

Any benefit to changing out the rear hugger? DO the aftermarket huggers have more protection for the bike and rider? I have the stock fender on there now and the stock rear hugger.

Thanks in advance for your advice/opinions/wise ass remarks.

Cheese.

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post #2 of 22 Old 09-07-2014, 04:08 PM
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While I cant comment on the fenders, heated jacket and gloves made the biggest difference in my cold riding experience

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post #3 of 22 Old 09-07-2014, 04:16 PM
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I can tell you that if you get a plastic fender extender don't try to get smart and use metal rivets, it'll end up cracking. I didn't order a 2nd one so can't comment on the effectiveness.

I did enjoy having my oem windscreen last winter (vs none). I also liked having the brush guards installed which helped deflect some air. Heated grips were nice but when you have wind and temps under 45 you need heated gloves or something more serious. I was thinking about buying a pair of battery powered gloved for this winter since that was the weak link by far. Note this is just for commuting, not trips.

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post #4 of 22 Old 09-07-2014, 04:56 PM
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I ordered a C.F. extender from Spain but I don't think it did much. Used silicone IIRC and its still there today (2011).

Don't fool around like I did with bulky gear, heated gloves and jacket with a neck gaiter and you're good. But... if you can't synthetic fabrics all the way to minimize bulk layers.

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post #5 of 22 Old 09-07-2014, 05:04 PM
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Givi A34 windshield
Oxford heated grips
BarkBusters Storm handguards
Pyramid fender extender

This is a good start, along with some Gerbings gear. You'll get through some cold rides....

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post #6 of 22 Old 09-07-2014, 05:58 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you all. Keep the ideas coming. I commuted year round two years ago in Cincinnati. I wouldn't go out if it was below freezing. Made do with good boots and an Olympia suit riding a ZRX.

Living in Maine now and would like to ride until the freeze -commuting 11 miles one way.

I think I'll forgo the carbon extender and go for a plastic one. Thanks for the rivet advice. I plan on installing it with silicone similar to the carbon install.

I'll look into the small screens and the givi one.

I'm also looking into some waterproof hard luggage.

Cheers,
Cheese

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post #7 of 22 Old 09-07-2014, 06:09 PM
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I have tried hand guards. They help a little, but not much. Went to a heated jacket liner and gloves a couple of years ago. They make riding in the cold much more bearable. I stay off the road when it's below freezing though.

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post #8 of 22 Old 09-07-2014, 08:57 PM
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A larger hugger will most definatly help out, my XB has a really short one(don't even start trolls...TWSS) and in heavy rain my ass gets wet, but in comparison my old GSXR had a much bigger hugger and I never had a problem

+1, to what mike said about avoiding freezing weather, problem I found is it doesn't need to be freezing to Hit slick spots, I ditch the bike at 40F because there's so many hills and lower spots the road can be fine one minute and icy the next....this last February I road to work cause it was dry and sunny, I cane out after a 12hr night shift to find an 1" of snow covering the roads had to wait for some cars to leave so I could follow their tracks

Bad weather is coming at us fast fellas, Be careful out there!

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post #9 of 22 Old 09-08-2014, 03:48 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiplash97 View Post
A larger hugger will most definatly help out, my XB has a really short one(don't even start trolls...TWSS) and in heavy rain my ass gets wet, but in comparison my old GSXR had a much bigger hugger and I never had a problem

+1, to what mike said about avoiding freezing weather, problem I found is it doesn't need to be freezing to Hit slick spots, I ditch the bike at 40F because there's so many hills and lower spots the road can be fine one minute and icy the next....this last February I road to work cause it was dry and sunny, I cane out after a 12hr night shift to find an 1" of snow covering the roads had to wait for some cars to leave so I could follow their tracks

Bad weather is coming at us fast fellas, Be careful out there!


Does anyone know which aftermarket huggers have more coverage than stock? I may wait and see how bad it is. My zrx came with a tail tidy, and I found and reinstalled the stock rear fender after one wet ride.

I too stop riding when it gets close to freezing. Southern Ohio was predictable; If it was above freezing in the morning, it was probably going to be above freezing in the evening. Maine is less so. I'll probably stop riding at 40 degrees too.

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post #10 of 22 Old 09-08-2014, 03:58 AM
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Actually I think the best protection for the getting a wet streak up your back is to leave the stock fender on the bike.

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post #11 of 22 Old 09-08-2014, 05:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marylandmike View Post
Actually I think the best protection for the getting a wet streak up your back is to leave the stock fender on the bike.
That's why I've left the beaver tail on the XB, otherwise I would have cut it off

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post #12 of 22 Old 09-08-2014, 02:23 PM
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Heated grips and Gerbing heated jacket/ gloves with dual temp controller. With some extreme cold weather Under Armour. Plus whatever other long underwear I can layer up. O yea multiple sock layers . Carhart socks are beast. It's all about the layers.. I work outside year round in Cincinnati. I have it down to a science but I look like a beefcake walking around. Lol

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post #13 of 22 Old 09-08-2014, 02:33 PM
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One more thing is the use of a wetsuit hood. I haven't personally tried it. But I know someone who won't ride in the cold without it now. I'm probably gonna make the purchase myself to keep the wind at bay. They are fairly cheap. May be worth a shot.

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post #14 of 22 Old 09-08-2014, 03:45 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marylandmike View Post
Actually I think the best protection for the getting a wet streak up your back is to leave the stock fender on the bike.

I plan on leaving the stock fender on for exactly that reason. I saw several aftermarket huggers and I was trying to figure out the benefit. Do they provide more coverage than stock? Just curious. Spring time riding here can involve some residual salt on the roads and I want to protect the bike.

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post #15 of 22 Old 09-09-2014, 02:45 AM
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Yeah it all works together to block the cold, hand guards, windscreen, heated gloves & jacket. Speed and duration (TWSS ) play a role too. Wind chill is cumulative. A 11 mile commute at nominal speeds will require less gear than several hours at highway speeds would. I also don my heated insoles on longer rides below freezing and I'm good down into the teens. I've never needed heat on my legs though. Good winter touring pants and base layer are enough. Warming your core with heated jacket / vest is essential. If your core gets cold, the body actually restricts blood flow to the extremities to protect vital organs making hands and feet even colder.
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post #16 of 22 Old 09-09-2014, 08:52 AM
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Heated gloves are a good idea when the temperature goes below 45 (F) or so as no conventional gloves I have tried are particularly effective for a long trip in the cold.

That said, by far the most effective cold weather riding suit I have ever used mirrors the Norwegian recipe for protection against the cold: heavy wool sweater and pants under a good quality rain suit. Many of the commutes and touring rides I have done when suited up in that fashion have me sweating instead of freezing even when the temperatures are in the teens. The most important aspect is to protect your neck from direct exposure to the icy wind -- commonly I use a long wool scarf wrapped around my neck and knotted in the back over any rain protection. The advantage to wool is it can be thoroughly soaked with water and still insulates, a unique property that few other fabrics can match.

On the subject of fenders -- the stock hugger and unmodified rear fender offer excellent protection against rain. Many times while riding in an unexpected heavy rain storm my jacket and pants get soaked, but my backpack stays dry. I can't imagine better protection from the rear.

The front, however, is another matter, and no extender will help. The problem is the water thrown off by the tire decelerates inside the fender and exits where the fender wraps around the fork sliders, creating two heavy streams of water that soak your boots / lower pant legs. From a safety point of view this is a good thing as the point of the fender is to get the water away from the tire tread as effectively as possible to prevent hydroplaning, but from a comfort point of view it is a downside unless your boots are thoroughly waterproof and the pants are not only waterproof but long enough to cover the boot uppers in your normal riding posture to prevent water from entering over the top of the boots and literally filling them up. To paraphrase an old saying: "If your feet are unhappy all of you is unhappy!"

As to windscreens: the motorcycle does not need protection in that area, and unless it puts you in a zone of dead air all they do is direct the cold / rain to your upper chest and helmet area, complicating insulation and rain protection.

Having ridden in the cold and / or rain for tens of thousands of miles I can say if you are adequately protected it can be exhilarating, but if not it can be the most miserable and dangerous time of your life.

Oh, and Michelin PR3's! The best rain tire I have ever used by a very wide margin, even compared with racing full wets.

Be careful out there!

Rob

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post #17 of 22 Old 09-09-2014, 10:35 AM
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I can't speak for everything but from most of the units I have seen the aftermarket fenders and huggers are all pretty much done in a fashion after the stock piece, just usually they are done in carbon fiber or something less exotic, so in most regards they are a identical replacement and not a real improvement.

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post #18 of 22 Old 09-18-2014, 12:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robtharalson View Post

Oh, and Michelin PR3's! The best rain tire I have ever used by a very wide margin, even compared with racing full wets.

Be careful out there!

Rob
I got the PR3's and last year rode into a torrential like downpour for 70 miles. While I was riding, I kept thinking.. "lots of water and heavy raining.. be careful.. but wow. these tires work great". Felt safer on the bike w/ the PR3's than compared to the handling of the tires on my big cadillac.

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post #19 of 22 Old 09-18-2014, 06:50 AM
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So that's why my legs/boots get soaked immediately.
love hitting puddles and having the tire spray water right on to your legs... ugh haha.

PR4's!

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post #20 of 22 Old 09-18-2014, 10:06 PM
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Any suggestions on actual rain gear? Also opinions on the big windscreen? http://www.jcwhitney.com/national-cy.../p2009901.jcwx
Something like this maybe? Looking at pure function... I know it's ugly though :/

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post #21 of 22 Old 09-19-2014, 01:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onevince View Post
Any suggestions on actual rain gear? Also opinions on the big windscreen? National Cycle Plexifairing GT Motorcycle Windshield - JCWhitney
Something like this maybe? Looking at pure function... I know it's ugly though :/
Every two piece rain suit I have tried works fairly well in a light to medium rain, but falls down on the job in a heavy downpour. The leak points are the joint between the jacket and pants and any zippers on the pants. If you are serious a one piece with a long zipper that goes down one leg instead of down the middle, and has a double Velcro flap for the entire length is the way to go. Something like this: http://www.bikebandit.com/riding-gea...c-h2o-rainsuit
Be sure to read the reviews -- often they will tell you if they are a snug or loose fit for a given size, so order accordingly. I tend to go a size larger than I think I need to give room for more than one layer under them. Of course too large tends to flap in the wind, so it can be a crap shoot lf you tend to use different bulks of gear under them. I find that wearing a small backpack over them not only gives you a convenient place to store small essentials that won't fit in the pockets in the suit itself, but the shoulder and waist straps provide a way to cinch down the chest area of the suit to help prevent flapping in the wind. The only disadvantage to a one piece compared to a two piece is they are more difficult to put on in a hurry, but IMO the superior protection more than makes up for that. I used one similar to this for a trip from Los Angeles to Kalispell, MO, a distance of roughly 1,800 miles, during which it rained for 1,500 miles, and stayed nice and dry the whole way. Can't beat that!

One last point: avoid Frogg Toggs! They are thin, tear easily, and tend to flap themselves to death in short order. At least the ones I tried about ten years ago.

Rob

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post #22 of 22 Old 09-19-2014, 04:19 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robtharalson View Post
. . . I used one similar to this for a trip from Los Angeles to Kalispell, MO, a distance of roughly 1,800 miles, during which it rained for 1,500 miles, and stayed nice and dry the whole way . . .
Here is my question: Which boots were you wearing?

I have a water proof textile suit, two rain suits, a helmet, some cheap thinsulate gloves that perform well int the wet, and a full face helmet. I wear heavy leather boots with "waterproofing" oil.

I've been riding in all sorts of weather for 24 years and just tolerated the shortcing of my gear.

As I am getting older, and my financial situation is maturing, I am thinking of getting more dedicated gear. The problem is the Yankee in me (and years of frugal living) have me balling at some of the year prices.

I think k my next purchases may be:

moto boots - do it all, all weather, good for commuting to an office
Gloves - (both my warm and cool weather gloves are over 10 years old).
A helmet - riding with a 5 yr old HJC F12 now. It's a little noisy.

My body would have stayed dry over 1500 miles, but I would have had soggy gloves and cool hands, wet feet, and probably got some seepage around my helmet and neck.

Would love to hear what people are using.

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