Chain / Sproket - Wrist Twisters
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post #1 of 41 Old 04-15-2011, 06:53 AM Thread Starter
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Chain / Sproket

In need of new chain/sprokets for an 02 919. Any recomendations on where to get a set of a good price online? needs to be able to ship to Canada.

Thanks!
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post #2 of 41 Old 04-15-2011, 08:44 AM
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I got mine through LDH. Give him a pm.

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post #3 of 41 Old 04-15-2011, 09:12 AM
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I got mine through LDH. Give him a pm.
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post #4 of 41 Old 04-15-2011, 09:37 AM
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yep. AFAM sprockets and DID chain is the way to go.

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post #5 of 41 Old 04-15-2011, 10:43 AM
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I bought my last set through
Sprocket Center -

Now that I know LDH sells 'em, Ill be checking with him first.

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post #6 of 41 Old 04-15-2011, 01:07 PM
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I got my DID from my local mechanic. Stock sprockets worked very well so no reason to change.

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post #7 of 41 Old 04-15-2011, 04:19 PM Thread Starter
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ya im just looking for a 530 stock tooth. not sure the 520 would have any benifits for me. a 520 is thinner and lighter or what?
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post #8 of 41 Old 04-15-2011, 04:25 PM
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+1 .... I just ordered a chain and sprocket set from Lord DuckHunter - Dan Kyle Racing. Awesome guy to work with.

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post #9 of 41 Old 04-16-2011, 05:46 AM
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post #10 of 41 Old 04-16-2011, 10:16 AM
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Quote:
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.... a 520 is thinner and lighter or what?
Yes.
A 520 chain with an alloy sprocket can shave off a pound or two or rotating weight.

For those that cannot afford to lose any time (seconds) on lap times, this is a good choice.
For the street? You'll be changing that alloy sprocket SOON, and a 520 chain will wear out faster than a 530 (quality being equal).

The OEM chain/sprocket lasted me about 20,000 miles, and the sprockets still looked good.

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post #11 of 41 Old 04-25-2011, 01:50 AM
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^^^ TexasTraffic speaks the truth here ... the 520 conversion on the street is not a good idea for the long term .... That's basically only useful on a track for professional riders who aint really gotta worry about parts lasting more than a few races ... just adding my 2cents on that ... I've seen more than a few snapped 520 chains on bigger bikes ... even one that bound up around the front sprocket and did a lil damage to the transmission ... :\

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post #12 of 41 Old 04-25-2011, 08:50 AM
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Some of you guys have no idea what you are really talking about or you have been buying shit chains or not taking proper care of them etc.

The DID ERV3 520 chain I sell and have been using for about a decade now on all my liter bikes both street & track has outlasted ANY OEM 530 chain I have ever used or seen used.

I have 14,000+ TRACK ONLY - HARD NASTY VICIOUS ABUSIVE miles on just one ERV3 520 chain and the chain itself is in excellent condition although the aluminum sprocket is starting to wear. This is normal & to be expected I mean if you can't afford a $60 rear sprocket every 8000-15000 miles or even an entire new Chain & Sprocket Kit ($225) then you are in the wrong sport because nothing about sportbikes is cheap. Not the insurance, tires, maintenance, repairs, nothing...

The overall weight savings of a 520 Conversion Kit over a an OEM 530 Kit is usually about 4lbs and that is rotational mass which means a lot more gyroscopic weight is lost when doing the 520 conversion.


Oh & while I am fairly meticulous with keeping the chains clean & lubed I am not exactly easy on them...


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post #13 of 41 Old 04-25-2011, 12:10 PM
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Just picked up a DID ERV3 chain from LDH 2 weeks ago.......it's a VERY nice chain. Also went with an AFAM hard anodized rear.

.....if you're buying shit chains and using cheap 520 vortex aluminum sprockets......sure, they'll wear out quick. Like everything, you get what you pay for.




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post #14 of 41 Old 04-28-2011, 07:59 AM
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I'll defer to LDH's and Arctic's experience & knowledge.

I am NOT meticulous about cleaning the chain, though I'm getting better. I do lube the chain at (or near to) the mfr's suggested interval of every 500 miles.

What is the danger of damaging O-rings with enthusiastic Grunge-Brush use?

So far I have stuck with an old toothbrush & diesel fuel for chain cleaning. It seems to work "OK", though the grunge brush look easier to use.

4lb savings? I didn't know it was that much.
Still... on a +90% street bike, I'll stick with the OEM-size chain/sprocket for now.

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post #15 of 41 Old 04-28-2011, 08:16 AM
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I just bought my 520 chain and sprockets from LDH also. Excellent service.

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post #16 of 41 Old 04-28-2011, 09:23 AM
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texas, i use the grunge brush and kerosene to clean my chain all the time. mainly what i do is when the chain is in need of lube and/or adjustment, i take a small rag soaked with kerosene and run it over the chain to soften up any grime, then i take the grunge bush soaked in kerosene and scrub the chain. then take a dry rag and wipe the chain off, go for a quick ride to get the chain warmed up and then hit it with the lube (teflon chain lube is my personal favorite by far). every 2-3k miles, i'll take the rear tire off and soak the chain in a bin with kerosene. this is where the toothbrush comes in handy.

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post #17 of 41 Old 04-28-2011, 09:27 AM
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You guys must have lots of free time on your hands...

WD-40 on a shop rag to clean the chain off & either some 80wt gear oil or Repsol chain lube to keep it protected from moisture. Takes less than 2 minutes start to finish and I am rolling again.

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post #18 of 41 Old 04-28-2011, 09:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord Duckhunter View Post
You guys must have lots of free time on your hands...

....
...and you must have a lot of WD-40 on your hands



(joking!)


I'll try the same thing with diesel, since it's handy and cheaper than WD-40 or kerosene.
Another rag saturated with gear lube would also be handy and quick.

Is there any reason or need to LUBRICATE on an O-ring chain? I notice the chain gets quieter after spraying it with lube.

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post #19 of 41 Old 04-28-2011, 09:58 AM
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The problem with Diesel is it is smelly & doesn't wash off your hands easily as it is basically a very fine oil.

WD-40 is conveniently placed in a can & washes off with mild soap in seconds. It is also kind to painted surfaces.


O-ring (X-ring) chains are lubed internally for life, but keeping the outside parts lubed does in fact extend the life, make the chain quieter and also allows the chain to move easier essentially giving back some of your horsepower normally lost through drivetrain mass and friction etc...

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post #20 of 41 Old 04-28-2011, 10:08 AM
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I just cleaned mine the other day, since I had the rear off anyway. Toothbrush and kerosene, although I've used Coleman gas, too. I think the white gas is a bit harsher as it really strips the oils from the chain. I think Kerosene worked better.



Noob question - I have a stock chain, 5k miles, but I'm already seeing bits of red 'dust' around the o-ring seals. Are the o-rings red and is my chain failing?

I'm usually pretty good about keeping it lubed up, but this seems like a warning sign...

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post #21 of 41 Old 04-28-2011, 10:24 AM
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Red dust is usually rust and if it is creeping out from your o-rings that means you have stripped the natural lube from under the o-rings and the chain is failing in a bad way. This usually happens when people use scrub brushes on their o-ring chains causing the o-ring to give way to moisture as the bristles move between the o-ring & the plate or they rinse the chain with a garden nozzle that utilizes a high pressure stream of water. The water displaces the grease under the o-rings and it ruins the chain.

Some cleaners & chemicals can also damage the o-rings or make them shrink which also allows water to get past their barrier the o-ring is supposed to provide.

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post #22 of 41 Old 04-28-2011, 10:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasTraffic View Post
I'll defer to LDH's and Arctic's experience & knowledge.

I am NOT meticulous about cleaning the chain, though I'm getting better. I do lube the chain at (or near to) the mfr's suggested interval of every 500 miles.

What is the danger of damaging O-rings with enthusiastic Grunge-Brush use?

So far I have stuck with an old toothbrush & diesel fuel for chain cleaning. It seems to work "OK", though the grunge brush look easier to use.

4lb savings? I didn't know it was that much.
Still... on a +90% street bike, I'll stick with the OEM-size chain/sprocket for now.
Btw, you can get this GrungeBrush at Walmart. ka-ching!

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post #23 of 41 Old 04-28-2011, 02:09 PM
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I put on a chain oiler 12K miles ago that uses Gear Oil. Wipe the chain down with a rag every so often. When I change my rear tire I clean with mineral spirits and a soft brush. I have one of those grunge brushes but those are some stiff bristles and I think it's too rough on the o-rings. I put the oiler on at the same time as a new chain, so should be interesting to see how long it lasts.

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post #24 of 41 Old 04-28-2011, 02:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord Duckhunter View Post
...
... usually happens when people use scrub brushes on their o-ring chains causing the o-ring to give way ...
Quote:
Originally Posted by marylandmike View Post
...
... those are some stiff bristles and I think it's too rough on the o-rings.
...
That's what I have been thinking.

The grunge brush may be good on a heavily caked, neglected chain, though I don't see any use for it on a chain that is kept fairly clean.
Time to find out if diesel will eat Nitrile gloves.

On the red dust:
The OEM chain that finally wore out showed red dust near the end. After taking the chain off and looking at it closely, the O-rings were well thrashed.
Where the chain would normally go weeks or months without needing adjustment, it became a regular chore to keep it tensioned right.
The final straw was a longer ride through the hill country where the chain started jumping or skipping teeth toward the end of the ride.

I took that as "a sign" and ordered up its replacement later that day.

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post #25 of 41 Old 04-28-2011, 04:45 PM
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LDH, i have to be a bit more detailed in my lube/cleaning process due to the very wet and contaminated riding conditions i go through on a daily basis. the lube that i use works great for keeping water and grime out/off of the chain over a period of time and i've seen a difference with this lube compared to other lubes out there that i've used in the same conditions.

it rains 9 months out of the year here.... and i wish i could maintain my chain the way you do... but i cant. luckily i have the whole process down to about 15 minutes or so, so it doesnt take lone and is usually done very 2-3 weeks depending on when the chain starts to get noisy/sloppy (through vibrations, not sound). when i do a detail clean of the chain, that's when i'm usually detailing the bike anyways to get all the road grime and filth off, the rear wheel is off so i might as well.

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post #26 of 41 Old 04-28-2011, 10:57 PM
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That makes sense based on the conditions you are subject to.

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post #27 of 41 Old 05-01-2011, 07:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord Duckhunter View Post
You guys must have lots of free time on your hands...

WD-40 on a shop rag to clean the chain off & either some 80wt gear oil or Repsol chain lube to keep it protected from moisture. Takes less than 2 minutes start to finish and I am rolling again.
Tried this today and it worked like a charm. I was surprised at how easy the WD-40 removed the grime on the chain. Thanks for the tip.

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post #28 of 41 Old 05-02-2011, 08:32 AM
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Quote:
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Tried this today and it worked like a charm. I was surprised at how easy the WD-40 removed the grime on the chain. Thanks for the tip.

Yup the only downside is the rag you use ends up being sacrificial. Nobody wants to keep an rag soaked in WD-40 and gunk laying around their shop. Well not anyone outside of Florida anyway

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post #29 of 41 Old 05-02-2011, 11:39 AM Thread Starter
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Is there any good online Canada based dealers? I know of bayside performance but thats about it. around 200 is what I am expecting to pay but its the shipping and duty that really gets ya.

Also do most chains come with the rivet syle link, or do most of you guys get the clip style?
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post #30 of 41 Old 05-02-2011, 11:42 AM
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I can ship the entire kit USPS Priority Mail International for $35

We only sell Rivet Style Master Links. Clip Style is a bad bad no-no and no respectable shop would sell or install a clip style master link on a current sportbike.

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post #31 of 41 Old 05-02-2011, 11:46 AM Thread Starter
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ohh i see, i thought i had one on my cbr once but could not remember. One would need to obtain the rivet tool specific for chains then?
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post #32 of 41 Old 05-02-2011, 11:50 AM
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From my personal experience, I'll say it again:

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post #33 of 41 Old 05-02-2011, 11:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by benr View Post
ohh i see, i thought i had one on my cbr once but could not remember. One would need to obtain the rivet tool specific for chains then?

Yes you would need access to Chain Breaker and/or rivet tool. These are available as separate tools or combo tools depending on which brand etc.

The other option is to pay your local dealer to install the chain kit. On most Honda's this is a 30-45 minute job.

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post #34 of 41 Old 05-02-2011, 11:57 AM
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Quote:
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Yup the only downside is the rag you use ends up being sacrificial. Nobody wants to keep an rag soaked in WD-40 and gunk laying around their shop. Well not anyone outside of Florida anyway
Does the WD-40 have any adverse affects on the o-rings? I know it deteriorates rubber



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post #35 of 41 Old 05-02-2011, 12:01 PM
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ohh i see, i thought i had one on my cbr once but could not remember. One would need to obtain the rivet tool specific for chains then?
I would. I tried to get away with out it but ended up getting LDH to send me a chain tool and master link after I screwed up the first one. Makes life much easier.

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post #36 of 41 Old 05-02-2011, 12:04 PM
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Does the WD-40 have any adverse affects on the o-rings? I know it deteriorates rubber
I've been listening to that debate for 10+ years and I can say that in my own personal experience, which is substantial, I suffered no o-ring failures after YEARS of WD-40 usage on dozens of bikes.

I'll go on to say that I don't even know what kind of rubber, if any, is truly affected by WD-40 or what the O-rings are made of in the DID chains I have been using. I am only assuming they are Buna-N which is mostly impervious to petroleum based products. Seeing as how they live their life in grease & oil this would make it a logical choice. Buna-N is also much more common and cheaper than EPDM or Viton o-rings etc, but again I have never really bothered to figure out their makeup.

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post #37 of 41 Old 05-02-2011, 02:04 PM
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look under "What surfaces or materials are OK to use WD-40 on?"
If your o-rings will get shot, WD40 will buy you new chain. I'm pretty sure WD40 will never have to do that though

WD-40 Frequently Asked Questions

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post #38 of 41 Old 05-02-2011, 02:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord Duckhunter View Post
Red dust is usually rust and if it is creeping out from your o-rings that means you have stripped the natural lube from under the o-rings and the chain is failing in a bad way. This usually happens when people use scrub brushes on their o-ring chains causing the o-ring to give way to moisture as the bristles move between the o-ring & the plate or they rinse the chain with a garden nozzle that utilizes a high pressure stream of water. The water displaces the grease under the o-rings and it ruins the chain.

Some cleaners & chemicals can also damage the o-rings or make them shrink which also allows water to get past their barrier the o-ring is supposed to provide.
I've only ever used a toothbrush to clean it, but maybe even that was too much. I will definitely need a new chain soon, it seems.

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post #39 of 41 Old 05-02-2011, 02:41 PM
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Cool with both LDH and WD-40 saying it will be fine. I doubt I will have any issues.



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post #40 of 41 Old 05-02-2011, 04:45 PM
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I've read a study someone did with WD40 on o-rings - used other typical chemicals (kero etc) as comparisons too. Everything was measured etc and there were no adverse affects with WD40.
Still I'd not recommend it to spray over a condom as a sexual lubricant, even if the smell turns you on.

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