Wheel Balancer & Tire Changer - Wrist Twisters
 
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post #1 of 19 Old 06-02-2008, 11:22 AM Thread Starter
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Wheel Balancer & Tire Changer

A couple off helpful products for the DIY shade tree mechanic.

Be sure to watch the videos.

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post #2 of 19 Old 06-02-2008, 12:08 PM
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i like the idea of those products alot. anybody have these? if so give your opinion.

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post #3 of 19 Old 06-02-2008, 12:48 PM
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For those that haven't thought of it, a set of jackstands works great to balance your wheels. Just put the axle in the wheel and set either end of the axle on each jackstand.

Works great

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post #4 of 19 Old 06-02-2008, 02:40 PM
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I think I'll be looking into getting the No-Mar "classic" tire changer.
Sign on the door will read; Custom Guitars & Repair and Tire Changing.

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post #5 of 19 Old 06-02-2008, 02:57 PM
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Just ordered the no-mar bar for use with my HF tire changer. Should have it shortly.

Actually, a co-worker bought the bar to complete the package after I got the changer, MC attachment, and mounted in my garage.

I scared him into finally buying the bar by showing him the gouges I put in my wheels using just spoons.... His S3's beautiful wheels will see no such abuse.

I take great joy in treating my 919 just like my Jeep.

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post #6 of 19 Old 06-02-2008, 03:01 PM
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Also, a great product for truing spoke wheels.

It's better to have loved and lost than live with the psycho for life!
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post #7 of 19 Old 06-02-2008, 07:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tarheelguy View Post
For those that haven't thought of it, a set of jackstands works great to balance your wheels. Just put the axle in the wheel and set either end of the axle on each jackstand.

Works great
+1...I used some jackstands and a stainless steel rod about the same size as the shaft (about $7 at Tractor Supply)...worked like a charm

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post #8 of 19 Old 06-02-2008, 10:11 PM
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I have the Harbor Freight moto tire changer and find that it works quite well. I also use the bar that came with the changer instead of buying the No-Mar bar. I have scraped a bit of the black paint off the edges of the rims but it's hardly noticable. For balancing I have borrowed a friend's - the Marc Panrnes model. The balancer is quite easy to use and I think much better (much more sensative) than using the wheel axel. I'll have to rty the axel method next time just to compare.
The whole setup isn't real expensive and when you buy tires at the special sales or internet bargains you will recognise quite a savings compared to dropping the bike off at the shop for tires. There is a bit of finesse involved with mounting tires but not having to wait for the shop to open sometimes has it's advantages.

BTW - if anyone has a Marc Parnes balancer that they aren't using any more I would be interested in buying one for myself (instead of borrowing). They can be had for around $100 new and every time I think of getting one I convince myself that borrowing my friends is just fine.

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post #9 of 19 Old 06-03-2008, 03:37 AM
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I did my rear tire a about a month ago and just used tire irons and a homemade bead breaker (made from 3/4" Galvanized Steel Pipe and a 2X4). Built a 19"X19" box from 2X4's to put the tire on when working on it. I dipped the ends of the tire irons in that plastic dip stuff a few day before. Had good luck with not scratching up the rims. Learned a lot of lessons the first time, so should be easier next time. It was my first tire change and it was very satisfying to do it myself.



I thought about the HF tire changer, but seemed like you have to bolt it down to the floor? Didnt really have room in my garage for that.

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post #10 of 19 Old 06-03-2008, 04:59 AM Thread Starter
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Another low cost bead breaker alternative:



Tire irons can be used with plastic rim savers to prevent scratching.


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post #11 of 19 Old 06-03-2008, 09:53 AM
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Just a word about using your axle versus a percision wheel balancer like the Marc Parnes.
The whole idea is to eliminate bearing & seal drag/friction in order to attain the lowest friction spin possible in order to attain the most accurate balance possible.

Having said this, I have used both methods with good and better results.

If using your axle, make sure the bearings rotate freely and that the spacer tube doesn't bind between the two bearings. You can stick your finger inside the bearing on one side and rotate it. If the bearing on the other side spins at the same time, it's binding and this isn't the optimum situation for balancing a wheel, if not, then you're good to go and will get good results.

I balanced the rear wheel on my 919 this way and felt it was good but was curious about what the difference might be whith a percision balancer like the Parnes. I was somewhat suprised by how much more easily the wheel spun compared to stock wheel bearings that were in excellent shape.

I ended up not only using less weight, but found a better location for the weight as well. The difference at speed could be felt.

Am I splitting hairs here?.... Of course I am, but I think it's the difference between whats considered "acceptable results" and "Perfection".

After years of balancing wheels for Karts, Midget & Sprint Cars, ChampCars and Motorcycles, I'm kind of a fanatic about it.

Hope this helps.

HBR

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post #12 of 19 Old 06-03-2008, 01:15 PM
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dynabeads

...until someone crashes because of them and i see proof of it.

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post #13 of 19 Old 06-04-2008, 04:58 PM
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I went the steel bar route a couple of inches longer then the axle for my BMW. I then bought 2 more sealed bearings that fit the bar. Then this bar w/bearings sits on top of the upright arms. I pried the seals out of the extra bearings only, and the wheel spins quite freely. I have not changed the bar size for the Honda yet. But, just using the OEM bearings, the wheel runs true to at least 130mph.

[
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post #14 of 19 Old 06-04-2008, 09:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brokerecord View Post
I went the steel bar route a couple of inches longer then the axle for my BMW. I then bought 2 more sealed bearings that fit the bar. Then this bar w/bearings sits on top of the upright arms. I pried the seals out of the extra bearings only, and the wheel spins quite freely. I have not changed the bar size for the Honda yet. But, just using the OEM bearings, the wheel runs true to at least 130mph.
Sounds like you're getting good results brokerecord. As you have already figured out, the key is in eliminating friction & drag.

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post #15 of 19 Old 06-05-2008, 05:55 AM
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I use the bikes axle make sure its clean and has no burrs maybe polish it with a little 500 or 600 grit paper.Made these brackets for my old truing jig and some
abec 5 bearings.

Later
Rich
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_4715.JPG (175.6 KB, 29 views)

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post #16 of 19 Old 06-05-2008, 07:46 AM
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Rich

Is that 2 small bearings on each side that your axle rides on? Real nice.

[
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post #17 of 19 Old 06-05-2008, 07:49 AM Thread Starter
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Rich - very cool set-up.

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post #18 of 19 Old 06-05-2008, 08:39 AM
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That'll work!

Skateboard bearings ?

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post #19 of 19 Old 06-05-2008, 08:54 AM
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Actually they were out of a Nagra 1/4 tape recorder. I had a bunch in stock
and they were either abec 5 or 7.I used a total of 8 two on each point.
Lay the axle across with a level to make sure it doesn't want to keep creeping
to one side.
Later
Rich

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