cush drive?? - Wrist Twisters
 
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post #1 of 11 Old 05-27-2007, 10:06 PM Thread Starter
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cush drive??

cush(spelling) drive part number one on the rear wheel breakout here



They call it a damper set for 24.95. I'm wondering how offen it goes bad or how you tell it is bad.. the guy at cycle gear said it was and i kinda think he was making sense with how he explained what it does

just curious what other's thoughts were...

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post #2 of 11 Old 05-28-2007, 01:43 AM
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The drive rubbers absorb driveline shocks by compressing then relaxing, not only to give a smoother feel, but also to protect the rest of the driveline from excessive spike loads, which will wear transmission components prematurely.
Unless you are really beating on it or have over 80,000 miles, the probability is you don't need the cushion rubbers. On what was he basing his diagnosis? My '02 with 30,000 spirited miles shows about 0.100" radial free play measured at the sprocket teeth and no axial (rocking) motion to speak of. This is perfectly normal for this mileage. If the movement is more than 0.200", rubber particles are showing between the carrier and wheel, there is any axial play, or you feel a step in the rotation of the carrier, the probability is they will have to be replaced. The consequences of failed rubbers is usually the driven flanges cast into the wheel will be broken away, effectively disconnecting the wheel from the carrier and requiring wheel replacement.

The most common cause of wear on the rubbers is axial play in the carrier, usually caused by a carrier bearing damaged by an overtightened chain, adding a rubbing motion against the rubber. If you are experienced enough with tools, remove the wheel and inspect everything yourself before replacing things on the word of someone else. If you are not sure, post detailed pictures and descriptions and we will render what help we can.

Rob

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post #3 of 11 Old 05-28-2007, 03:21 AM
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What usually happens is the rubber banding connecting pairs together break. It can make it a little difficult to reassemble. Not a reason to replace though.

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post #4 of 11 Old 05-28-2007, 08:46 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robtharalson View Post
On what was he basing his diagnosis? My '02 with 30,000 spirited miles shows about 0.100" radial free play measured at the sprocket teeth and no axial (rocking) motion to speak of.
I'm not sure if i understand the differences of radial free play and axial rocking. I had the wheel off laying down on the brake disk side with drive rubbers and carrier installed, I could twist it forward and backwards but i am unsure of the amount and will take off and measure later. Also the cycle gear guy stated that he should have had to kinda work kinda hard to get the carrier into the wheel with the drive rubbers and that they should at least be a snug fit which why he said they were bad. I didn't ask why because it thought mostly me being hard on the throttle from a take off or any action similar probably caused this. but with your statement...


Quote:
Originally Posted by robtharalson View Post

The most common cause of wear on the rubbers is axial play in the carrier, usually caused by a carrier bearing damaged by an overtightened chain, adding a rubbing motion against the rubber. If you are not sure, post detailed pictures and descriptions and we will render what help we can.

Rob

I may have overtightened the chain once but unsure how long it was run that way. If that was the case and the carrier bearing is damaged is there an easy way to verify this once the wheel is removed? I am thinking (smell the burning) trying to wiggle the axle up and down with only the carrier on it to verify the possible trouble??

Quote:
Originally Posted by hondajim

What usually happens is the rubber banding connecting pairs together break. It can make it a little difficult to reassemble. Not a reason to replace though.
The banding between them was very much still intact.


Thanks for the help!! Oh and I just tripped 10k miles and i was just hoping a simple replacing of the rubbers.... oh man


One more question please can i just tap the carrier bearing and dust seal out and replace by tapping another new one in or is there more to it??

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post #5 of 11 Old 05-28-2007, 10:34 PM
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Mea Culpa

I got them backward. Correction as follows.
Axial motion is rotation about an axle: in this case, how much rotation you can get from the carrier while holding the wheel stationary.
Radial motion is movement in line with the axle. Test this by sitting down facing the side of the rear wheel, grasping the sprocket and pulling it toward you, then pushing it away. The total movement is its radial play. Be careful while doing this -- the bike could fall on you!

Excessive axial rotation indicates the rubbers are worn.
Excessive radial movement indicates a bearing problem.

I would be astounded if there is a problem with either.
Give it quick inspection, then just ride it.

Rob

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post #6 of 11 Old 05-29-2007, 06:02 AM
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Sounds bad, you should trailer it to Burlington immediately, and trade it in on an Aprilia.

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post #7 of 11 Old 05-29-2007, 07:48 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RidgeRunner View Post
Sounds bad, you should trailer it to Burlington immediately, and trade it in on an Aprilia.
I'll be there tonight! You're offing a even trade on your aprilia for my honda right!!

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post #8 of 11 Old 05-29-2007, 08:06 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robtharalson View Post
Test this by sitting down facing the side of the rear wheel, grasping the sprocket and pulling it toward you, then pushing it away. The total movement is its radial play. Be careful while doing this -- the bike could fall on you!



Rob

Which way is best to measure this on the kick stand or from one of the lifts that support the bikes from the swingarm? It might be a little more stable just wondering if most of the weight needed to be on the wheel?

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post #9 of 11 Old 05-29-2007, 08:07 AM
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Ummmm, no, but I do have a very good relationship with my local Aprilia dealer. He has about 4 2007 Tuonos at the ready for just such an occasion. Which color would you like, and i'll tell them to have it prepped.

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post #10 of 11 Old 05-29-2007, 08:53 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RidgeRunner View Post
Ummmm, no, but I do have a very good relationship with my local Aprilia dealer. He has about 4 2007 Tuonos at the ready for just such an occasion. Which color would you like, and i'll tell them to have it prepped.
at $13k I'll stick to my easily maintainable HONDA that will be ridden more than admired

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post #11 of 11 Old 05-29-2007, 12:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajcombs View Post
Which way is best to measure this on the kick stand or from one of the lifts that support the bikes from the swingarm? It might be a little more stable just wondering if most of the weight needed to be on the wheel?
The wheel can be completely off the ground or fully loaded. The wheel bearings support the weight of the bike, while the only load on the carrier bearing is applied by the chain while riding. So if you are checking it on the side stand, have someone hold the bike to prevent a trip to the hospital when it lands on you. I just checked mine, and found virtually no side to side movement. If you are still in doubt, take it to another mechanic and have him check it. I'm willing to bet he will tell you it's fine.

Rob

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