New Rider - Dad needs some advice!!! - Wrist Twisters
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post #1 of 14 Old 05-28-2018, 04:01 PM Thread Starter
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New Rider - Dad needs some advice!!!

My 17 year old daughter has expressed interest in getting a bike. While I would love nothing more than to spend days riding with her, the path from complete novice to competence terrifies me, thoughts which I've shared with her. We went and looked at bikes today to let her get a feel for what she's interested in. Discussion seemed to center around the Honda CB300F/R (or maybe 500?). She really REALLY liked the CBR300R but I'm dreading the first, inevitable, parking lot drop when she scuffs the bodywork.

We will be buying used so the final decision will be made on what's available and what fits in her price range. (She's paying for it.)

She's a complete novice, hasn't driven a stick shift, so she'll be starting at ground zero. I've told her that completing the MSF Basic riding class is a must do before we can even start to get serious about buying a bike.

Has anybody gone down this path willing to give me some sage advice? Any input for Dad?

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post #2 of 14 Old 05-28-2018, 04:28 PM
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If she was my daughter, I'd buy a little used 4 stroke dirtbike. A 100, or 150. Find a field that she can play on it. She can learn throttle control. clutch, balance, etc. That is how I got my son started. He took to the 250 Ninja very well. He dropped it a couple of times. Oh well.....
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post #3 of 14 Old 05-28-2018, 04:47 PM
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I have a 16yr old daughter. Started her out years ago on a quad bike on beach and track. Moved her onto a crf125 a few years back, same beach/track stuff. When she's ready I'll probably get her a cb250 as her first road bike.
I probably wouldn't have let her get a road bike as her first bike. I felt the dirt bike was necessary to teach her on. She learnt in a safe environment where she didn't have to worry about dickheads in cars.

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post #4 of 14 Old 05-28-2018, 05:24 PM
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post #5 of 14 Old 05-28-2018, 05:24 PM
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Around here the Ninja 250 bikes are all over Facebook and craigslist anywhere from $700-3000. I keep a good eye on the market, and there’s no doubt that would be my choice.

I started at 14 on a Honda 250 Nighhawk and I feel it was a great choice, if a little tall maybe.

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post #6 of 14 Old 05-28-2018, 07:25 PM
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i think something worth considering, when choosing is what personality your kid has. Is she calm and composed? Risk taker? Attentive/focused or distracted? etc. Is she aware of the danger of the motorcycle? Is she going to fear and respect the motorcycle or just think that she's just cool and will show off?



Depending on the answer the number of bikes that are appropriate will either go up or down.


Personal example: i'm 27now, but I got my first vehicle at 22yo, (honda cb1) according to statistics prime time for young boys to be crazy. 6months later i upgraded to a 9er and never looked back. Never had an accident never had any bad experiences. I always was very respectful of my bike especially the 9er and always rode like everybody was going to kill me. Whenever i '"disrespected" the bike i always got snipped in the ass and put back in line.


Thats my 2 cents as a young moto driver and how I chose a bike... ( i knew that my wrist was ok for a bigger bike )
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post #7 of 14 Old 05-29-2018, 07:09 AM
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I've got 2 perspectives on this: how I started vs. how my wife started.

From my own experience, I would highly recommend the dual-sport route as a starter bike. If you have access to land to ride on, she'll be able to ride around and get a feel for controlling the bike in a reasonably safe environment. Once she demonstrates good control of the bike and the controls start becoming 2nd nature, send her to the MSF and graduate her to street riding on that same bike. Another benefit of the dual-sport is that tip-overs and other minor incidents usually don't cause any real damage, and any that does need fixing is usually pretty cheap. After a reasonable period of road time, then start looking at a lower cc street bike. JMHO from my personal experience.

My wife, on the other hand, started on a street bike. In her mid-30's she decided she wanted to ride (I knew her, but we weren't even dating at the time). She started by reading all she could, then went to a 2 day MSF course before even buying a bike. She chose an SV650S (the one we still have), and except for one tipover early on, she has never had an issue. I think it helped that the people she rode with back then were primarily on cruisers... I believe taking the MSF at the get-go was instrumental in her development into the rider she ultimately became.

While I didn't really provide an answer, hopefully it is food for thought. As others have said, how you approach this will depend on how seriously your daughter is willing to take it.


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post #8 of 14 Old 05-29-2018, 12:53 PM
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I think the CB300F/CB500F would be great contenders for a first machine. I have a CB500F and it is a great bike. I thought about the CB300F but decided I'd really feel more comfortable with the 500 because I wouldn't worry about being "in the way." The way idiots drive around here, you really need to be able to run just a bit faster than the usual cell phone traffic just for self-protection.


Try to find a used bike because it's gonna go down and she won't feel so bad about dropping a used machine. We're not talking high-side crashes here, just the inevitable parking lot or stop sign drop that happens to everybody.


A motorcycle riding course is a must and the idea of getting used to powered 2-wheel machines on a small dirt bike is an excellent one!
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post #9 of 14 Old 05-29-2018, 02:03 PM
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I would never allow my kids to ride a motorcycle on public roads in this day & age.



If they haven't been riding on a motorcycle from a very early age like 5 or 6 their entire life then they stand no chance of learning the skills that will keep them from being a statistic on public roads. Drivers now have way too many distractions with smart phones, in dash navigation etc hell I saw a woman typing on her laptop while driving one morning last week on my way to work. I mean the cold, hard truth is that every single morning every radio station in this country tells us of at least one motorcycle fatality on the morning commute if not multiple accidents involving motorcycles. EVERY SINGLE DAY.


It's not a matter of if, but merely when at this point and as a professional motorcycle instructor I cannot think of anybody I know that started riding motorcycles late in their teens that has the skillset to manage todays driving hazards.

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post #10 of 14 Old 05-29-2018, 03:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LDH View Post
I would never allow my kids to ride a motorcycle on public roads in this day & age.



If they haven't been riding on a motorcycle from a very early age like 5 or 6 their entire life then they stand no chance of learning the skills that will keep them from being a statistic on public roads. Drivers now have way too many distractions with smart phones, in dash navigation etc hell I saw a woman typing on her laptop while driving one morning last week on my way to work. I mean the cold, hard truth is that every single morning every radio station in this country tells us of at least one motorcycle fatality on the morning commute if not multiple accidents involving motorcycles. EVERY SINGLE DAY.


It's not a matter of if, but merely when at this point and as a professional motorcycle instructor I cannot think of anybody I know that started riding motorcycles late in their teens that has the skillset to manage todays driving hazards.
As harsh as the above is, the unfortunate part is that it is oh so valid.
Personally, I have never diverted from what was drilled into me when I first started riding in 1973.
The vast majority of motorcycle accidents are in an urban area, involve a car, and at that time, left hand turn involvement was also heavily represented.
Today I'd describe the left hand turn element as likely in second place to distracted/underslept/frustrated/aggressive drivers of anything with wheel counts of 4 and above.
To this day, I don't ride around town, and instead get out of town to do non urban riding.
When I am in an urban setting, I still use the same approach I've had since Day 1: If they can see you, they are out to get you. If they can't see you, they are going to get you. Sort of Defensive Driving ++.
One thing is for sure, a track is by far a safer place to ride!

Past that, I wouldn't dissuade someone wanting to start road riding, but I sure would caution them.
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post #11 of 14 Old 05-30-2018, 04:03 AM
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The other day I was out and about on the trusty 919. To get to some decent rural roads I have to go through a particularly difficult intersection. My lane has an almost perpetual green arrow for right turn I need to make while the oncoming traffic does not ever have a green arrow for left turn. As I approached the intersection I could see an SUV with a left turn signal on. I always try to make eye contact with the driver of a left turning car just to make sure but I could see that this driver was looking down at something. As I expected she went ahead with her left turn in front of me and never saw me because it turned out that she was messing with a cell phone. Had I assumed it was safe to follow my green arrow I would have ended up under the SUV.



Driving with a cell phone in your hands should be a capital offense because of the number of serious "accidents" caused by this practice. However, I see virtually no enforcement of rules against it. Riding a 'cycle in urban traffic is a very hazardous operation, particularly for new riders.
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post #12 of 14 Old 05-30-2018, 06:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trailing_Throttle View Post
I always try to make eye contact with the driver of a left turning car just to make sure
Fantastic reminder.
Thanks for saying that.

Which also means having one's face shield up at intersections, for those with full coverage helmets.
I also deliberately move my head and not just my eyes.
Anything extra that can be done to attract attention can only be a good thing.

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post #13 of 14 Old 05-30-2018, 09:32 AM
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Should've revved the shit out of the bike when the chick started the turn :P


Quote:
Originally Posted by Trailing_Throttle View Post
As I expected she went ahead with her left turn in front of me and never saw me because it turned out that she was messing with a cell phone. Had I assumed it was safe to follow my green arrow I would have ended up under the SUV.

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post #14 of 14 Old 05-30-2018, 07:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trailing_Throttle View Post
I think the CB300F/CB500F would be great contenders for a first machine. I have a CB500F and it is a great bike. I thought about the CB300F but decided I'd really feel more comfortable with the 500 because I wouldn't worry about being "in the way." The way idiots drive around here, you really need to be able to run just a bit faster than the usual cell phone traffic just for self-protection.


Try to find a used bike because it's gonna go down and she won't feel so bad about dropping a used machine. We're not talking high-side crashes here, just the inevitable parking lot or stop sign drop that happens to everybody.


A motorcycle riding course is a must and the idea of getting used to powered 2-wheel machines on a small dirt bike is an excellent one!
The CB300F damn near drives itself. My almost 16 year old son has expressed interest in riding and this will be his first bike. Seat height seems low, and it's smooth as butter (for everything except finding neutral). We're going to do the MSF course the minute he has his drivers license. I hope to unload my CB300F on him, with the full intention of getting back in the saddle of a 919.

I'm not worried that he's never tackled a manual transmission. I'm confident in the MSF instructors for sorting that bit out. Wet clutch vs dry clutch makes the learning curve a lot less steep.
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