Honda 919 homemade frame sliders - Wrist Twisters
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post #1 of 13 Old 10-13-2017, 04:01 PM Thread Starter
Tirone
 
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Honda 919 homemade frame sliders

I thought I would like to have some sliders for my newly-acquired 919 so I started searching the internet. After reading some horror stories of broken engine casings from the engine-mount sliders, I decided to find some that mounted to the frame. The only ones I found were the Motovation brand and they were $139.50 (ouch!) plus they were out-of-stock. I had some scrap 1" aluminum round bar stock, so I decided to make my own. I have less than $3 invested in the hardware.
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post #2 of 13 Old 10-13-2017, 04:40 PM
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Amazing what a bit of DIY spirit can do for you!

ATGATT || Proud second-hand owner of a well-loved Honda 919
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post #3 of 13 Old 10-13-2017, 06:06 PM
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They look great all polished up.

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post #4 of 13 Old 10-14-2017, 05:10 AM
(Quintus) Pilus Prior
 
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Tell us more. I'm guess they would hold up about as well as the others, but I'd be concerned about them snapping off. The all thread wouldn't be as strong as the special bolt.

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post #5 of 13 Old 10-14-2017, 07:40 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KarlJay View Post
Tell us more. I'm guess they would hold up about as well as the others, but I'd be concerned about them snapping off. The all thread wouldn't be as strong as the special bolt.
I'm not sure which would be better. The hardened bolt would be more prone to possibly snapping-off I would think. The softer all-thread would tend to bend, but I'm no metallurgist.

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post #6 of 13 Old 10-15-2017, 01:24 AM
(Quintus) Pilus Prior
 
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Originally Posted by supersix View Post
I'm not sure which would be better. The hardened bolt would be more prone to possibly snapping-off I would think. The softer all-thread would tend to bend, but I'm no metallurgist.
I was thinking about the thickness. The other one is a "shouldered" bolt, if you look at the actual amount of metal, the shouldered bolt would be a lot thicker. This is one of the problems I have when I replace an automotive bolt with a universal one.

I have a thru bolt on another bike for the crash bars and it's very thick compared to an all thread. Don't know if it matters or not, I guess if you hit hard enough, the engine's a goner anyways. It's more for the light accidents.

I went down pretty hard on the other bike and the bars actually bent into the engine, it hit hard enough to make the alt rub when I fired it up.

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post #7 of 13 Old 10-15-2017, 01:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by supersix View Post
I'm not sure which would be better. The hardened bolt would be more prone to possibly snapping-off I would think. The softer all-thread would tend to bend, but I'm no metallurgist.
Point blank, never use beyond North American SAE Grade 5 or metric ISO Class 8.8 fastening for frame sliders.
Some ductility is desired, and the higher grades are poor in that respect.
My guess is that the Ready Rod could be in SAE Grade 2 or 5.
I'd stay away from 2.

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post #8 of 13 Old 10-16-2017, 06:50 AM
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Just playing devils advocate, but is there a reason why most/all reputable frame sliders are made out of delrin? My concern would be that in a crash, the force would be transferred 100% to the frame instead of being absorbed by the derlin puck. Since all that force is now concentrated to a single point, are you more likely to cause more damage than good?

I don't want to piss all over your hard work (it looks great by the way), but I would hate for the aluminum sliders to cause more problems down the road.



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post #9 of 13 Old 10-16-2017, 07:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crakerjac View Post
Just playing devils advocate, but is there a reason why most/all reputable frame sliders are made out of delrin? My concern would be that in a crash, the force would be transferred 100% to the frame instead of being absorbed by the derlin puck. Since all that force is now concentrated to a single point, are you more likely to cause more damage than good?

I don't want to piss all over your hard work (it looks great by the way), but I would hate for the aluminum sliders to cause more problems down the road.
Delrin has a lower coefficient of friction, and is fare easier to machine compared to softer nylon, and aluminum will actually grab the pavement and bend or be ground off in a matter of feet. Delrin is not made for impact resistance, but as a slider puck that will wear off slower in the event of a low-side or small slow crash. The problem with the longer sliders is they have a tenancy to fold over and "lever" out the mounting bolt, thus stripping all the treads out of the mounting hole. Just another reason to use a solid piece through bolt and share the load with the other bracket.
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post #10 of 13 Old 10-16-2017, 08:05 AM
(Quintus) Pilus Prior
 
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I don't remember how long my bike slid, but the bars are mild steel and they REALLY did their job. It's the 700S and the bolt up to the frame and the engine at 3 different points, one is a cross bolt.

The mild steel really took a beating.

I don't know at what point it won't matter any more, the engine is just one part of the bike. We have a bike salvage yard here and it's full of bike that have knock-off-plastic from being totaled out. What good is saving the engine if the bike is a complete write off? IDK, how much an engine is worth in a totaled bike.

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post #11 of 13 Old 10-21-2017, 11:22 AM
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This is a rear axle slider from a 990 Super Duke, that I recently bought. If anyone thinks they can fabricate engine sliders from it, I will sell what you see for $60, delivered. USA, only. PM to me.
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post #12 of 13 Old 10-22-2017, 11:15 PM
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Thanks for this supersix. Can you post a pic or 2 of them mounted on the bike...would love to see the final product?!

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post #13 of 13 Old 10-23-2017, 10:42 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by MotoMike View Post
Thanks for this supersix. Can you post a pic or 2 of them mounted on the bike...would love to see the final product?!
I sure can.
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