Crash repair - Wrist Twisters
 14Likes
  • 1 Post By KarlJay
  • 1 Post By KarlJay
  • 1 Post By mcromo44
  • 3 Post By Bigdaa
  • 2 Post By Pvster
  • 1 Post By Islandboy
  • 2 Post By mcromo44
  • 1 Post By arnablaze
  • 1 Post By Pvster
  • 1 Post By Diablo
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 37 Old 05-25-2018, 04:10 AM Thread Starter
Tirone
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 30
Rep Power: 1
 
Garage
Crash repair

New poster here. Unfortunately my relationship with the 919 has been exciting but short lived. Bought a lovely silver 04 with 2,500 miles a few months ago. Sad part is I just crashed it at a track day. ĎBout broke my heart. Now trying to figure out what to do with it. Would like to rebuild it. Anyone have a parts bike theyíd sell? Where is the best place to find replacement parts? In NJ.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

arnablaze is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 37 Old 05-25-2018, 07:15 AM
just send it.
 
crakerjac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 1,600
Rep Power: 1
 
Garage
You know... it doesn't look too bad. new tail, seat bars and lots of cleaning. You can try paintless dent repair on the tank, or leave it as is. Big question would be is anything bent.



[This space for rent]
crakerjac is offline  
post #3 of 37 Old 05-25-2018, 07:45 AM
(Quintus) Pilus Prior
 
badmoon692008's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Neenah, WI
Posts: 2,232
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Extraordinary Ride 
Total Awards: 1

Looks better off than mine when I crashed at a trackday... At least your gauges and headlight are still in place!... It looks like after a good cleaning all you'll really *need* is some new handlebars... maybe some switchgear if it gets damaged... and then bodywork if you want to make it pretty again.. Hopefully someone will be along with a parts cache, but would be helpful if you got a chance to clean it off and throw a list together of what you need.

Love is the feeling you get when you like something as much as your motorcycle - Hunter S. Thompson
I just mı̸̸̸̸̸̸̸̸̸̸̸̸̸̸̸̸̨ade you wipe your screen.
-2009 Suzuki GSX-R 750 Race Bike
-2007 Honda 919
-1995 Nighthawk 750 (Tboned)
-1983 KZ 440 (Sold)
badmoon692008 is offline  
 
post #4 of 37 Old 05-25-2018, 07:58 AM
LDH
Test Rider
 
LDH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: by the ocean
Posts: 4,464
Rep Power: 1
 

Awards Showcase
Trackday Recognition Referral Award 
Total Awards: 2

you running 15 year old tires that were designed 25 years ago?

LDH is offline  
post #5 of 37 Old 05-25-2018, 08:55 AM
McTavish
 
mcromo44's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Calgary
Posts: 5,967
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by arnablaze View Post
New poster here. Unfortunately my relationship with the 919 has been exciting but short lived. Bought a lovely silver 04 with 2,500 miles a few months ago. Sad part is I just crashed it at a track day. ĎBout broke my heart. Now trying to figure out what to do with it. Would like to rebuild it. Anyone have a parts bike theyíd sell? Where is the best place to find replacement parts? In NJ.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Very sad reading.
First track day on it?
What happened?

mcromo44 is offline  
post #6 of 37 Old 05-25-2018, 10:29 AM
(Quintus) Pilus Prior
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Sacramento
Posts: 2,302
Rep Power: 1
 
Gotta start with a good cleaning, then figure out what needs to be replace. I have some dings on mine and I don't worry about them. Trying to keep a bike 100% perfect is expensive. My gauge cover has been cracked for years now, I don't worry about it. Fix what has to be fixed and keep your eyes open for the other parts.
arnablaze likes this.

KarlJay is offline  
post #7 of 37 Old 05-25-2018, 02:02 PM Thread Starter
Tirone
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 30
Rep Power: 1
 
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by LDH View Post
you running 15 year old tires that were designed 25 years ago?


I know, right? It was a Champ school and I didnít plan to be pushing their limits. First track day and I got carried away. They were in good shape and scrubbing fine.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

arnablaze is offline  
post #8 of 37 Old 05-25-2018, 02:08 PM Thread Starter
Tirone
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 30
Rep Power: 1
 
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcromo44 View Post
Very sad reading.

First track day on it?

What happened?


First track day and I only put 1 tank of gas through it, so new to the bike as well. The guy behind me said I hit a peg. I think it was the foot brake, which would obviously cause a crash. Notice itís tip is bent back 90 deg. I donít think the mud would have done that. But the real cause was I was having so much fun, I pushed too hard. Should have stayed within my limits.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

arnablaze is offline  
post #9 of 37 Old 05-25-2018, 02:14 PM Thread Starter
Tirone
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 30
Rep Power: 1
 
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by badmoon692008 View Post
Looks better off than mine when I crashed at a trackday... At least your gauges and headlight are still in place!... It looks like after a good cleaning all you'll really *need* is some new handlebars... maybe some switchgear if it gets damaged... and then bodywork if you want to make it pretty again.. Hopefully someone will be along with a parts cache, but would be helpful if you got a chance to clean it off and throw a list together of what you need.


I will, but it will be a while. I left it at my sisters house near the track. Cleaning it off priority was somewhere behind the broken wrist, sprained ankle, cracked rib, ground off thumb knuckle, and getting home 1.5 hrs away. Glad my gear did itís job.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

arnablaze is offline  
post #10 of 37 Old 05-25-2018, 02:18 PM Thread Starter
Tirone
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 30
Rep Power: 1
 
Garage
I know I have seen comments on here about guys dragging knees on a 919. I know your knee should touch before the bike, but I was as stretched out as I could get. A young guy there had the same problem on his 599 hornet. Does that sound right? Whatís the secret?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

arnablaze is offline  
post #11 of 37 Old 05-25-2018, 04:31 PM
(Quintus) Pilus Prior
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Sacramento
Posts: 2,302
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by arnablaze View Post
I know, right? It was a Champ school and I didnít plan to be pushing their limits. First track day and I got carried away. They were in good shape and scrubbing fine.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
You were actually running 15 year old tires on a track? I thought he was joking. I've heard nothing but good about the 919 on the track or street for handling except the rear shock and limited adjustments.
Coondawg07 likes this.

KarlJay is offline  
post #12 of 37 Old 05-25-2018, 05:06 PM
McTavish
 
mcromo44's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Calgary
Posts: 5,967
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by arnablaze View Post
I know I have seen comments on here about guys dragging knees on a 919. I know your knee should touch before the bike, but I was as stretched out as I could get. A young guy there had the same problem on his 599 hornet. Does that sound right? Whatís the secret?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I don't know if there is any real secret.
I'm just short of 6 ft with longish legs.
I have a Corbin seat which is very tall, which actually makes knee down more difficult not easier.
I have Renthal ULs which are very low and forward in comparison to stock bars.
I easily hook my outside knee under the flare out of tank by ankling my foot.
I hang from that, outside butt barely on inboard of seat area.
Well off to the inside and down.
Yes, knee should touch down before anything starts dragging, although that statement is much more so if one has stiffer springing than late model 919s.
04 and later are so soft, they really compress down once loaded up in a turn.
Also, if your right foot peg was not folding, I doubt your brake lever hit first.
Was the peg folding while you had your foot on it?
Anyway, most unfortunate, but at least you got off not bad, aside from your ground off knuckle.
Ouch!
arnablaze likes this.

mcromo44 is offline  
post #13 of 37 Old 05-25-2018, 05:39 PM
Brain stolen again?
 
Bigdaa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Goleta, California
Posts: 17,396
Rep Power: 1
 
It looks like it will buff out.
Coondawg07, arnablaze and Diablo like this.

ďI said I never had much use for one.
Never said I didn't know how to use it."
Mathew Quigley
Bigdaa is online now  
post #14 of 37 Old 05-25-2018, 06:14 PM
McTavish
 
mcromo44's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Calgary
Posts: 5,967
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by arnablaze View Post
I know, right? It was a Champ school and I didnít plan to be pushing their limits. First track day and I got carried away. They were in good shape and scrubbing fine.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
What exactly were those tires you had on?
Surely not the originals.................................
Tell us it ain't so!

mcromo44 is offline  
post #15 of 37 Old 05-25-2018, 08:03 PM Thread Starter
Tirone
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 30
Rep Power: 1
 
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcromo44 View Post
What exactly were those tires you had on?

Surely not the originals.................................

Tell us it ain't so!


Afraid so. OEM.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

arnablaze is offline  
post #16 of 37 Old 05-26-2018, 09:27 AM
McTavish
 
mcromo44's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Calgary
Posts: 5,967
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by arnablaze View Post
Afraid so. OEM.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Hockey pucks look good, will scrub, but can't gum up.

mcromo44 is offline  
post #17 of 37 Old 05-26-2018, 10:01 AM
The Cripple
 
Pvster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 8,772
Rep Power: 1
 
So much face palm in this thread...

1 heat cycle and those tires were beyond toast. Not that they weren't toast before you rode it on the track.

Glad you're ok. Could have been much worse, even with the injuries you have. You indeed did ride beyond your limits, not just the physical limits. That's a very tough and expensive lesson to learn.

Bike looks easily repairable if the frame and engine are not cracked. I'll scrounge up what parts I have left and see if I can help you out.

Pvster is offline  
post #18 of 37 Old 05-26-2018, 01:13 PM Thread Starter
Tirone
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 30
Rep Power: 1
 
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcromo44 View Post
I don't know if there is any real secret.

I'm just short of 6 ft with longish legs.

I have a Corbin seat which is very tall, which actually makes knee down more difficult not easier.

I have Renthal ULs which are very low and forward in comparison to stock bars.

I easily hook my outside knee under the flare out of tank by ankling my foot.

I hang from that, outside butt barely on inboard of seat area.

Well off to the inside and down.

Yes, knee should touch down before anything starts dragging, although that statement is much more so if one has stiffer springing than late model 919s.

04 and later are so soft, they really compress down once loaded up in a turn.

Also, if your right foot peg was not folding, I doubt your brake lever hit first.

Was the peg folding while you had your foot on it?

Anyway, most unfortunate, but at least you got off not bad, aside from your ground off knuckle.

Ouch!


It definitely folded, but not sure if it was before or after. I was about 6 hrs into the day.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

arnablaze is offline  
post #19 of 37 Old 05-26-2018, 01:18 PM Thread Starter
Tirone
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 30
Rep Power: 1
 
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pvster View Post
So much face palm in this thread...

1 heat cycle and those tires were beyond toast. Not that they weren't toast before you rode it on the track.

Glad you're ok. Could have been much worse, even with the injuries you have. You indeed did ride beyond your limits, not just the physical limits. That's a very tough and expensive lesson to learn.

Bike looks easily repairable if the frame and engine are not cracked. I'll scrounge up what parts I have left and see if I can help you out.


Tell me about it. They had been working fine all day. I asked multiple techs to check them out throughout the day.

Any specific places to check for frame cracks? Motor mounts were intact. Mostly landed in a big muddy field. Thanks for checking your parts bin.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

arnablaze is offline  
post #20 of 37 Old 05-26-2018, 01:20 PM Thread Starter
Tirone
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 30
Rep Power: 1
 
Garage
Crash repair

Quote:
Originally Posted by mcromo44 View Post
Hockey pucks look good, will scrub, but can't gum up.


Iím sure they werenít gripping like Q3s or Pirellis, but they seemed to be gumming up fine. Only 2,800 miles and they had been inside their whole life.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

arnablaze is offline  
post #21 of 37 Old 05-26-2018, 01:35 PM
The Cripple
 
Pvster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 8,772
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by arnablaze View Post
They were gumming up fine. Only 2,800 miles and they had been inside their whole life.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
That makes no difference. What you're missing that all of us are trying to say is that tires have a limited number of heat cycles they can withstand before the rubber compounds lose the qualities that give them the traction to grip. Age, lack of use, etc. All add up to reduce the number of heat cycles a tire can withstand. And don't forget the number of heat cycles the tire goes though during each season while sitting unused, regardless of whether they were stored indoors or not. Unless you can verify through your own eyes that the bike indeed spent the full 15 years indoors with controlled climate, you just really don't know what it was subjected to.

Then there is the fact that the OEM tires are shit to begin with, new off the factory floor. They were in no condition to be used on the street due to age and lack of use, let alone a track day where you need 100% of the tire's performance. Any rubber compound will gum up when hot enough and subjected to smaller surface areas while exerting g forces on it.

You were no where near ready to take a new to you bike to the track. The bike certainly wasn't ready as well. You also weren't mindful of the limitations you put on yourself. The biggest limitation you exceeded while riding was your mental ability and critical thinking skills. You did not think this through well, and you paid for it. Luckily not with your life or more serious injury.

I know this is very direct (part of my deaf culture) so it might take you back a bit. However, we want you to understand the gravity of the decisions made that led up to this point so that you continue to ride, survive, build your physical as well as mental skills, and spend many years enjoying the ride.
Coondawg07 and arnablaze like this.

Pvster is offline  
post #22 of 37 Old 05-26-2018, 01:47 PM
Discen
 
Diablo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Buderim
Posts: 200
Rep Power: 1
 
You should replace your tyres every 5 years, even if they look new.

Diablo is offline  
post #23 of 37 Old 05-26-2018, 03:35 PM
McTavish
 
mcromo44's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Calgary
Posts: 5,967
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by arnablaze View Post
Iím sure they werenít gripping like Q3s or Pirellis, but they seemed to be gumming up fine. Only 2,800 miles and they had been inside their whole life.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Another way to look at it is this.
Even if those tires were brand new as recently made, my guess is that they would be 7- 10 seconds a lap slower than current tires of Dunlop Q3+, and maybe even slower.
So even if those old tires were like new, you could so easily get suckered into trying a pace that's way beyond the tires by trying to keep up with the crowd.
Then add the aging effects of such old tires, and you can rather see how much of trap there is.
I relate it to cool pavement cool air track days with beginner and/or stupid cheap 600 CC racers running on a stack of cast away race tires and not even having warmers for them.
I call it "the blues" because such tires look blue and you get blued up when you bin it, plus feeling the blues.

mcromo44 is offline  
post #24 of 37 Old 05-26-2018, 03:44 PM
919 Rider
 
Islandboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Flinders island
Posts: 2,571
Rep Power: 1
 
arnablaze. Glad your OK. Your bike looks awful, but repairable. I think it takes guts to post a fuck up like that. Thanks for the lesson.
arnablaze likes this.

Islandboy is offline  
post #25 of 37 Old 05-26-2018, 03:45 PM
McTavish
 
mcromo44's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Calgary
Posts: 5,967
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcromo44 View Post
I don't know if there is any real secret.
I'm just short of 6 ft with longish legs.
I have a Corbin seat which is very tall, which actually makes knee down more difficult not easier.
I have Renthal ULs which are very low and forward in comparison to stock bars.
I easily hook my outside knee under the flare out of tank by ankling my foot.
I hang from that, outside butt barely on inboard of seat area.
Well off to the inside and down.
Yes, knee should touch down before anything starts dragging, although that statement is much more so if one has stiffer springing than late model 919s.
04 and later are so soft, they really compress down once loaded up in a turn.
Also, if your right foot peg was not folding, I doubt your brake lever hit first.
Was the peg folding while you had your foot on it?
Anyway, most unfortunate, but at least you got off not bad, aside from your ground off knuckle.
Ouch!
A good way to figure out all this body position stuff is to try it in your garage or on your driveway.
Get a race stand.
Get a stool that is similar to the height of the foot pegs.
Wear your leathers and boots.
Hook the right knee on the tank, and use the bars.
Now manipulate your left leg such that the sole of your boot is against the side plate above the peg.
Just doing this will force your knee out and down.
Next get your butt over to the inside, and start working towards getting the knee down low.
You may find to really get down, you'll have to have your inside forearm hanging vertically below the grip.
Depending on the stool or chair, you may be able to get the kneed down such that it's resting on it.
If not, you'll appreciate having it there should the bike start to tip when you're trying all of this.
Find a position that works, and it will feel strange and have to be "learned".
"Learn" the position at rest, not at pace!
Do the same for the other side.
Then learn how to move from one to the other.
Then learn how to speed that transition up.
The next time you go to the track, it will feel familiar and then you can start refining things based on your particulars.
Plus, you'll never have a trapped foot squished by a heavily loaded folded peg.
This is all 70s era Superbike racing stuff, so if you want some guiding and inspirational pictures, you know what to look for.
For the lean angles and peg heights of a tracked 919, the old school way is great.
Not good for serious super sports at pace though, as their lean angles are so extreme there simply isn't room to do King Kenny Roberts knee out style.
Coondawg07 and arnablaze like this.

mcromo44 is offline  
post #26 of 37 Old 05-27-2018, 05:17 AM Thread Starter
Tirone
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 30
Rep Power: 1
 
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pvster View Post
That makes no difference. What you're missing that all of us are trying to say is that tires have a limited number of heat cycles they can withstand before the rubber compounds lose the qualities that give them the traction to grip. Age, lack of use, etc. All add up to reduce the number of heat cycles a tire can withstand. And don't forget the number of heat cycles the tire goes though during each season while sitting unused, regardless of whether they were stored indoors or not. Unless you can verify through your own eyes that the bike indeed spent the full 15 years indoors with controlled climate, you just really don't know what it was subjected to.

Then there is the fact that the OEM tires are shit to begin with, new off the factory floor. They were in no condition to be used on the street due to age and lack of use, let alone a track day where you need 100% of the tire's performance. Any rubber compound will gum up when hot enough and subjected to smaller surface areas while exerting g forces on it.

You were no where near ready to take a new to you bike to the track. The bike certainly wasn't ready as well. You also weren't mindful of the limitations you put on yourself. The biggest limitation you exceeded while riding was your mental ability and critical thinking skills. You did not think this through well, and you paid for it. Luckily not with your life or more serious injury.

I know this is very direct (part of my deaf culture) so it might take you back a bit. However, we want you to understand the gravity of the decisions made that led up to this point so that you continue to ride, survive, build your physical as well as mental skills, and spend many years enjoying the ride.


Not missing it, and not offended at all. I agree with everything you are said, and I appreciate the concern. Nothing I havenít been telling myself all week. Lots of face palm here, I know. Got too caught up in the moment. Wonít happen again. Just want to get street worthy. New tires will be first on the list once itís back together.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

arnablaze is offline  
post #27 of 37 Old 05-27-2018, 05:18 AM Thread Starter
Tirone
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 30
Rep Power: 1
 
Garage
Crash repair

Quote:
Originally Posted by Islandboy View Post
arnablaze. Glad your OK. Your bike looks awful, but repairable. I think it takes guts to post a fuck up like that. Thanks for the lesson.


Thanks. Thatís where Iím at....


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
mcromo44 likes this.

arnablaze is offline  
post #28 of 37 Old 05-27-2018, 12:27 PM
The Cripple
 
Pvster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 8,772
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by arnablaze View Post
Not missing it, and not offended at all. I agree with everything you are said, and I appreciate the concern. Nothing I havenít been telling myself all week. Lots of face palm here, I know. Got too caught up in the moment. Wonít happen again. Just want to get street worthy. New tires will be first on the list once itís back together.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
My apologies for coming down on you hard then. I'm glad you understand and see where we're coming from. We want you to live and enjoy riding for a long time. To do so means you need to mitigate every possible risk. Starting with your mind.

Please post a list of all the parts you need and I'll see what parts I have left over to help you out for cheap. They won't be perfect though, if that's ok.
arnablaze likes this.

Pvster is offline  
post #29 of 37 Old 05-27-2018, 07:21 PM Thread Starter
Tirone
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 30
Rep Power: 1
 
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcromo44 View Post
A good way to figure out all this body position stuff is to try it in your garage or on your driveway.

Get a race stand.

Get a stool that is similar to the height of the foot pegs.

Wear your leathers and boots.

Hook the right knee on the tank, and use the bars.

Now manipulate your left leg such that the sole of your boot is against the side plate above the peg.

Just doing this will force your knee out and down.

Next get your butt over to the inside, and start working towards getting the knee down low.

You may find to really get down, you'll have to have your inside forearm hanging vertically below the grip.

Depending on the stool or chair, you may be able to get the kneed down such that it's resting on it.

If not, you'll appreciate having it there should the bike start to tip when you're trying all of this.

Find a position that works, and it will feel strange and have to be "learned".

"Learn" the position at rest, not at pace!

Do the same for the other side.

Then learn how to move from one to the other.

Then learn how to speed that transition up.

The next time you go to the track, it will feel familiar and then you can start refining things based on your particulars.

Plus, you'll never have a trapped foot squished by a heavily loaded folded peg.

This is all 70s era Superbike racing stuff, so if you want some guiding and inspirational pictures, you know what to look for.

For the lean angles and peg heights of a tracked 919, the old school way is great.

Not good for serious super sports at pace though, as their lean angles are so extreme there simply isn't room to do King Kenny Roberts knee out style.


Thanks, MC. I like the stool idea, hadnít thought of that. I read Sport Riding Techniques by Nick Ienatsch, he sponsored the ChampSchool I was taking. Watched Twist of the Wrist II, and started on Proficient Motorcycling that others had recommended here. I was working on most of this during the day, starting from about 30 mph: butt off the seat, braking, loading the peg, chin on your wrist, 100 point of available traction, apexes, seeing the turn, slowest point of the turn, etc. What I wasnít prepared for was how much my confidence would improve and how much Iíd want to build speed. I heard something since about always staying about 30% below where you think your threshold is. Should have made that my #1 plan.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

arnablaze is offline  
post #30 of 37 Old 05-27-2018, 07:24 PM Thread Starter
Tirone
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 30
Rep Power: 1
 
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by Diablo View Post
You should replace your tyres every 5 years, even if they look new.


Never heard that, but sounds like good advice. Thanks.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

arnablaze is offline  
post #31 of 37 Old 05-27-2018, 07:43 PM
McTavish
 
mcromo44's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Calgary
Posts: 5,967
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by arnablaze View Post
Thanks, MC. I like the stool idea, hadnít thought of that. I read Sport Riding Techniques by Nick Ienatsch, he sponsored the ChampSchool I was taking. Watched Twist of the Wrist II, and started on Proficient Motorcycling that others had recommended here. I was working on most of this during the day, starting from about 30 mph: butt off the seat, braking, loading the peg, chin on your wrist, 100 point of available traction, apexes, seeing the turn, slowest point of the turn, etc. What I wasnít prepared for was how much my confidence would improve and how much Iíd want to build speed. I heard something since about always staying about 30% below where you think your threshold is. Should have made that my #1 plan.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
I have the highest regard to all the authorities you listed, subscribe to them and refer to them.
BUT, I do not at all buy into the "Chin on Wrist" or "Kiss the Mirror" for old school bar and peg heights that 919s have, especially when idea is to shift your C of G as much as you can inboard.
I have my head to the left of the end of the bar, and down, such that there is about 1.5 inches gap from the side of my helmet to the end of my bar end plugs and my eyes are sorta level with the centre of the bar in the grip area.
All of this is to reduce the angle of bike lean necessary for a given speed and radius of turn by advantageously relocating the combined net centre of gravity from all of your skillfull body contortions.
Thus giving you more corner speed potential for the same radius of turn by using more lean angle.
Ed Bargy by far offers the most expansive coverage and explanation of all this particular aspect.

mcromo44 is offline  
post #32 of 37 Old 05-27-2018, 08:48 PM
(Quintus) Pilus Prior
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Sacramento
Posts: 2,302
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by arnablaze View Post
Never heard that, but sounds like good advice. Thanks.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
The tires have a date code and when you buy new ones, you want to make sure they are fresh. You might be surprised how many tires are thrown away that have "plenty of tread" on them.

That's also one of the reasons that getting softer tires isn't such a bad deal.

If you get high mileage tires and throw them away when 1/2 the tread is still there, then you might as well have bought the soft tires and wore them out.

KarlJay is offline  
post #33 of 37 Old 05-28-2018, 12:57 PM
Discen
 
Diablo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Buderim
Posts: 200
Rep Power: 1
 
When I bought my 919 he told me it had new tyres on it, but when I checked the date on the tyre it was 05/07,
the VIN number was 06/07.
So the tyres were made one month before the bike was and 11 years old.
I read an article recently that there is a push in Australia to make it illegal to have tyres older than 10 years for cars,
and 5 years for bikes, as the rubber loses it's gripping properties over time.
I put some Metzler Roadtec 01's on and it's like riding on rails.
If I hadn't read the articles I may have kept riding on them.
Your bike looks easily repairable, you will look back and enjoy your experience after time.
arnablaze likes this.

Diablo is offline  
post #34 of 37 Old 05-28-2018, 01:10 PM
(Quintus) Pilus Prior
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Sacramento
Posts: 2,302
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Diablo View Post
When I bought my 919 he told me it had new tyres on it, but when I checked the date on the tyre it was 05/07,
the VIN number was 06/07.
So the tyres were made one month before the bike was and 11 years old.
I read an article recently that there is a push in Australia to make it illegal to have tyres older than 10 years for cars,
and 5 years for bikes, as the rubber loses it's gripping properties over time.
I put some Metzler Roadtec 01's on and it's like riding on rails.
If I hadn't read the articles I may have kept riding on them.
Your bike looks easily repairable, you will look back and enjoy your experience after time.
I wonder how many people actually know how to read tire date or know there's a date code on there.

I have some "roll around" tires on a few cars, some of them are from the 1970's. Had one of them just fall apart just sitting there.

KarlJay is offline  
post #35 of 37 Old 05-28-2018, 01:59 PM
McTavish
 
mcromo44's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Calgary
Posts: 5,967
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KarlJay View Post
I wonder how many people actually know how to read tire date or know there's a date code on there.
Not enough, that's for sure!
Along the same lines, the portion of the car driving public that thinks tread depth alone is the measure of a tires wear and overall condition, is nothing short of scary - particularly so in terms of wet driving.
Nicely grooved hockey pucks that still can't grip!

mcromo44 is offline  
post #36 of 37 Old 05-28-2018, 04:40 PM
(Quintus) Pilus Prior
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Sacramento
Posts: 2,302
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcromo44 View Post
Not enough, that's for sure!
Along the same lines, the portion of the car driving public that thinks tread depth alone is the measure of a tires wear and overall condition, is nothing short of scary - particularly so in terms of wet driving.
Nicely grooved hockey pucks that still can't grip!
I have an old F250 HighBoy and it has the now rare 16.5 rims with 36" tires. They're expensive and the one's I've had on there were used back in 2000. My dually has 6 tires and that's about a 600 investment for something that I don't drive ver often.

I do push things, but these haven't been driven in years.

Part of the problem is the we never know exactly when to get new tires. Can you go 4 year, is 5 ok, what about 6 if you're not aggressive...

KarlJay is offline  
post #37 of 37 Old 05-28-2018, 05:49 PM
McTavish
 
mcromo44's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Calgary
Posts: 5,967
Rep Power: 1
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KarlJay View Post
I have an old F250 HighBoy and it has the now rare 16.5 rims with 36" tires. They're expensive and the one's I've had on there were used back in 2000. My dually has 6 tires and that's about a 600 investment for something that I don't drive ver often.

I do push things, but these haven't been driven in years.

Part of the problem is the we never know exactly when to get new tires. Can you go 4 year, is 5 ok, what about 6 if you're not aggressive...
For me, I bin tires if they no longer a good for a certain performance, regardless of remaining tread depth, or bin them once the tread wear has reached the point of not being safe.
We run two sets of wheels on each of our two cars, one winter set, the other a three season set.
We have binned winters with lots of tread left upon discovery of their being scary bad on wet pavement.
All of our three seasons binning has been due to lack of tread depth.
(if we didn't mile them out, I'd look for wet driving performance degradation)
I have found 4 years to be a decent yardstick.
I think getting more than that with winters is a push, for sure after 5 years, they simply don't work anything like they used to on ice, and get really bad in the wet.
We run Nokian studless Hakka' winters.

mcromo44 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Wrist Twisters forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome