Bike Ride from Salt Lake City to San Francisco - Wrist Twisters
 
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post #1 of 11 Old 06-10-2013, 01:13 PM Thread Starter
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Bike Ride from Salt Lake City to San Francisco

Hey guys,

I'm still pretty new to this forum, but have found a lot of information to be very helpful, and am happy there is such a large community that contributes.

Next week I will be taking my first true long ride. I am very accustom to riding 100-150 miles, but this will be the first true Long Ride I have ever taken.
My plan is to ride from Salt Lake City to San Francisco in somewhere around 12-13 hours.

I'm going to California to help my grandfather move after a recent family passing, and thought this would be an excellent opportunity to take my 07 Honda 919 out for the long ride that I always wanted.

Now, after all that jibberish, I'll get to the point that I was hoping to get some advice on. I wanted some opinions on what I should expect with this long ride. I have never ridden that far before so I am concerned of things maybe I should take with me, I should be aware of, and what the fatigue is like on the body since I will be helping my grandfather move upon arrival.

Any help or advice will be greatly appreciated, thank you all very much for your time!!

Ride on!

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post #2 of 11 Old 06-10-2013, 05:17 PM
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First thing that comes to mind is DON'T. To do 735 miles in 13 hours you'll have to average 56mph. Experienced long distance touring riders would be hard pressed to maintain that speed. Take 2 or 3 days if you can - pace yourself and take little leg stretching breaks at fuel stops, etc. Maybe even do a little sight seeing so you're not exhausted when you get there. Silly things happen inside that helmet when fatigue sets in. You don't want to be fighting to stay alert. If you have to ride straight through, a couple hour nap works wonders. The Iron Butt Association website has a wealth of information on the subject such as "banking sleep" which is getting a little extra sleep each night before your trip.

I'd carry the usual essentials: plug kit & pump, chain lube and tools to adjust, hydration & high protein snacks or energy bars. Eat light and often. Leave the Monster drinks at home and keep caffeine intake to a minimum. A seat cushion helps immensely. I won't travel without my Air Hawk.

This is me after 1068 miles in 22 hours.


I'm sure I'll think of more - stay tuned.
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post #3 of 11 Old 06-10-2013, 05:24 PM
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Longest stretch I've ever done was from Reno, NV to Pocatello, ID in one day, something like 680 miles. Started at 8 in the morning and rode all day, stopping when needed for breaks, etc. Still didn't get there until almost 11 at night and I was VERY exhausted. I would not suggest it unless you have done smaller legs and know what you're in for. Take two days at least.

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post #4 of 11 Old 06-10-2013, 05:57 PM
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Furthest I've gone in a stretch is from Indianapolis to Minneapolis. Took me 10-11 hours. My suggestion is to stay hydrated and take lots of breaks.

I was only stopping when I HAD to fill up on gas (to save some time since I was already taking the long way home through Iowa)... Bad idea. I got to the MN boarder and I was about done. So exhausted from the 100+ heat I almost got a room for the night only being a couple hundred miles from home. When I stopped for gas at the boarder, I found a shady spot and took a nap... Looking back I'm sure it probably looked a little odd seeing me passed out under a tree in nothing but my shorts, but when I woke up I felt great and was able to make it home without any problems.

Moral of the story. Don't push yourself. Stay hydrated and stop often... If you are hydrated, you will probably have to stop often to pee anyways.



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post #5 of 11 Old 06-10-2013, 06:23 PM
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AAA card, send messages to someone 2-3x a day for location updates. Hydration pack and take lots of little sips vs giant gulps every now and then. Stay hydrated, stretch every piss break, stay cool.

If it gets ridiculously hot, open all the jacket vents and wet the top half of your shirt. This will create a radiator effect within your jacket. Have a spare shirt for when the sun goes down and temps drop quick.

First aid kit with quick clots. Best bet are outdoor places, particularly hiking friendly. They'll have compact kits for not much. Most importantly take lots of pictures, share it with us, and enjoy your trip!

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----------------
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- '01 RC51 SP1 (Sold)
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"Security is mostly a superstition, it does not exist in nature: avoiding danger in the long run is no safer than outright being exposed. Life is either a daring adventure or nothing."-Helen Keller
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post #6 of 11 Old 06-10-2013, 07:52 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you all for your quick replies, it makes me feel a little more confident that I'm more prepared then I was originally thinking. I'm starting to think I should be greatly concerned about the heat, sounds like a camelback would be a good investment. When doing the long rides is it mostly fatigue?? I know everyone experiences things differently, but should I anticipate being sore or just overall tired?? I think the heat and just the distance should be tiring within it's self, i've driven via car many times and I know I get tired with that, I just don't know how to compare it to a bike, shall I invest in some Icy/Hot back strips

I'll make sure to post pictures, I anticipate that going through the Sierra's will be my favorite part!

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post #7 of 11 Old 06-10-2013, 09:08 PM
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Another thing, don't eat big meals. Power bars, dried fruit, sunflower seeds if they help keep your mind busy.

A big meal in the heat causes excess blood to flow to the stomach to aid digestion, and will cause mental fatigue and lack of concentration, not to mention put you to sleep.

No turkey either, lol.

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post #8 of 11 Old 06-11-2013, 11:01 AM
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How many miles are on your tires? I like to start a long trip on new rubber - especially in the heat. You could easily turn this 1500 mile trip into 2500. You can always reload your current tires and wear them out closer to home.

A friend of mine told me he was making a trip to San Antonio. I told him not to leave town on THAT tire. He did anyway - had a blowout - tossed his wife off the back and they both had to have multiple ankle surgeries and couldn't ride for a year and a half. . . . not to mention totalling the bike.
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post #9 of 11 Old 06-11-2013, 11:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Phenix View Post

A friend of mine told me he was making a trip to San Antonio. I told him not to leave town on THAT tire. He did anyway - had a blowout - tossed his wife off the back and they both had to have multiple ankle surgeries and couldn't ride for a year and a half. . . . not to mention totalling the bike.
That's terrible Ken!! +1 on tires with good meat, otherwise consider putting new ones while in SF.

My classified(s):
Nothing at the moment

----------------
------------
---------
------
---
- '96 Race-retired GSXR 750 (Sold)
- '01 RC51 SP1 (Sold)
- '03 919

"Security is mostly a superstition, it does not exist in nature: avoiding danger in the long run is no safer than outright being exposed. Life is either a daring adventure or nothing."-Helen Keller
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post #10 of 11 Old 06-11-2013, 11:37 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Phenix View Post
How many miles are on your tires? I like to start a long trip on new rubber - especially in the heat. You could easily turn this 1500 mile trip into 2500. You can always reload your current tires and wear them out closer to home.

A friend of mine told me he was making a trip to San Antonio. I told him not to leave town on THAT tire. He did anyway - had a blowout - tossed his wife off the back and they both had to have multiple ankle surgeries and couldn't ride for a year and a half. . . . not to mention totalling the bike.
I replaced both front and back tires about 2K miles ago, both still have solid tread, no signs of cracks, abrasions, or abnormal wear.
I was also thinking about getting some frame sliders before I left, I figured they were fairly simple to put on, and easily affordable for the protection. any recommendations or thoughts on if i should??

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post #11 of 11 Old 06-11-2013, 05:56 PM
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Yes to the frame sliders! The $35 one on the left side of my bike saved the whole bike except the radiator. I'd be looking at thousands in damage if it weren't for that slider.

2009 Aprilia Tuono - Ginger
2001 XR650R BRP (Big Red Pig)
2006 Honda 599 - Ex wrecked it :-D
2007 Honda CB900F (sold)
2006 Honda VTX 1300C (sold)
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